Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Grundy Co. IL
    Posts
    773

    Pig Roast Guru's

    We want to do a pig roast this year for company picnic, need a little help, is it best in the ground, or smoker, and how do you guys or gals spice it, or stuff it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    960
    ummm well not per say ever made a pig roast, but I'd say get some help with it because they ( pigs ) are quite heavy. Head has to go, insides too, clean well and put it over a rotisserie to cook. Lots of wood and do just half at a time or have two rotisserie's going , for a rub on it that can be just about any good dry rub , every-ones got their own dry rub. For how long to cook half a pig ? till a leg feels lose or inside thermometer reads Ready.. Oh you have to skin or scald it before ya cook it. Fat back skins make good pork rinds If you scald it you'll have to scrape it to get the hair off. Here in Texas we eat beef the War Department ( Hubby ) is from Iowa where he has raised allot of hogs..
    You don't have to ASK

    What I'm Against...

    If you know what

    I'm For...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    South/West of Quebec in the other part of Canada
    Posts
    2,331
    The spit is better....You end up with spackle....(burnt skin)

    The best one I did, was when a friend of mine took the bones out of the legs and stuffed them with sausage.
    It's Time To Be Nice To People

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    In the ground is the best IMO. Rub/season it, stuff it with veggies, and dig it up the next day for meat that falls off the bone and you need no knife.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,765
    we just drive over to the Italian market section of Philly and buy it already cooked...........

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Grundy Co. IL
    Posts
    773
    Thanks for the replies. I've got untill August, but am already getting hungry.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    bogart ga.
    Posts
    200
    Quote Originally Posted by smokin68 View Post
    In the ground is the best IMO. Rub/season it, stuff it with veggies, and dig it up the next day for meat that falls off the bone and you need no knife.
    I agree. But wrap it in bannana leaves if available in your area also they do real well with a pork roast or chicken, hawaiians been using'em for centurys
    EN VINO VERITUS

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Grundy Co. IL
    Posts
    773
    Quote Originally Posted by kruzer2001 View Post
    I agree. But wrap it in bannana leaves if available in your area also they do real well with a pork roast or chicken, hawaiians been using'em for centurys
    That sounds great, but I've lived in IL, all my life and I have yet to see a banana tree, what do the leaves do, add flavor?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    bogart ga.
    Posts
    200

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay 41 View Post
    That sounds great, but I've lived in IL, all my life and I have yet to see a banana tree, what do the leaves do, add flavor?
    Yes adds flavor and is a natural tenderizer. Sorry did'nt notice the IL I reckon there's not a lotta bannana trees there too bloody cold and unhealthy for warm growing things, like bannana trees and us southern technicians
    EN VINO VERITUS

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    St. Paul MN
    Posts
    260

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Bennington, Vermont U.S.A.
    Posts
    13,864
    Up here in Vermont digging a hole in the ground to cook a pig is out of the question. Unless you have a friend with a backhoe.

    I did about 20 pigs in my career as a "Pig Mister." It is a lot of work to do a pig on a spit. We built a spit out of 250 gal oil tank. We could do up to a 250 lb.er. It takes at least 10 hours cooking time. Cook it with a slow fire of apple wood. Stuff the pig with apples and pineapples chunks. Rub the out side with colander, salt and worstershire sauce. Then you have to rap it very tightly with wire and chicken wire and aluminuim foil. When you get the pig it is stiff as a board. But when it is near cooked you got a pile of cooked meat flopping around. You won't know which end is up. Bottom line---- Cooking a pig is not a pretty site for the Cookers.

    My advice: The best part of the pig is the tenderloin. You can get a tender loin for around 3 bucks a pound. This is pure meat and no bone. They weight around 15-20 lbs. Depending on how many people you can do 2-3 or 4 and be WAY ahead of the game. Figure .25lb per woman and .50 lb for a man. Wrap the loins up in aluminum foil, with the above mentioned apples, pineapples colander, salt worstershire sauce. Then make a rack and cook them in a shallow pit above the ground . Have your fire in a pit. Get a meat thermometer. Cook them very slowly. Bring them up 20 degrees and hour. Believe me if you want to enjoy the day yourself this is the way to put on a "Pig Roast". Email me if you want more info.
    Last edited by Green Mountain; 06-21-2008 at 04:09 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Grundy Co. IL
    Posts
    773
    Quote Originally Posted by benncool View Post
    Up here in Vermont digging a hole in the ground to cook a pig is out of the question. Unless you have a friend with a backhoe.

    I did about 20 pigs in my career as a "Pig Mister." It is a lot of work to do a pig on a spit. We built a spit out of 250 gal oil tank. We could do up to a 250 lb.er. It takes at least 10 hours cooking time. Cook it with a slow fire of apple wood. Stuff the pig with apples and pineapples chunks. Rub the out side with colander, salt and worstershire sauce. Then you have to rap it very tightly with wire and chicken wire and aluminuim foil. When you get the pig it is stiff as a board. But when it is near cooked you got a pile of cooked meat flopping around. You won't know which end is up. Bottom line---- Cooking a pig is not a pretty site for the Cookers.

    My advice: The best part of the pig is the tenderloin. You can get a tender loin for around 3 bucks a pound. This is pure meat and no bone. They weight around 15-20 lbs. Depending on how many people you can do 2-3 or 4 and be WAY ahead of the game. Figure .25lb per woman and .50 lb for a man. Wrap the loins up in aluminum foil, with the above mentioned apples, pineapples colander, salt worstershire sauce. Then make a rack and cook them in a shallow pit above the ground . Have your fire in a pit. Get a meat thermometer. Cook them very slowly. Bring them up 20 degrees and hour. Believe me if you want to enjoy the day yourself this is the way to put on a "Pig Roast". Email me if you want more info.
    This is the best idea I've heard yet, I will e-mail for the info, Thanks.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    188
    I've been to lplenty pig roasts growing up. Most I've seen were on cinder block spits, leave the head on if at all possible because it adds a big of authentic touch and you always have someone that likes pig ears (maybe not in IL). I've also seen smaller ones on the metal trailer grills. Usually, folks meander up to the pig and steal a piece of meat here, or a piece of skin there- darn good eating at a pig pickin'. Try to find a recipe for some authentic hash, serve it with rice, also have plenty of jalapeno slaw, beer, and all three kinds of BBQ sauce - mustard, vinegar, and tomato based on hand. It wouldn't hurt to have a keg or two of some decent beer on hand either. You never know when there might be a need to get good and drunk.

    As far as prep - for a pig, you're better to do a rub but watch out for using too much sugar in the rub or the skin will burn. Start the pig the night before and slow cook that thing on embers from a wood fire you start in a metal drum, have a few folks over for cards and telling lies all night. Never let anyone talk you out of FedExing in a few bushels of fresh, raw oysters in from the coast and steaming them in burlap while you're waiting on the hog. It's only your company's money.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event