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Thread: Thermopan

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    128

    Thermopan

    Has anyone used this product? Our HVAC isntaller is using it in a few locations to pan the returns (also panning the insides of the joists and caulking, not just the bottoms). It looks nice, and sounds good on paper. What is the long term look on this stuff? Will it hold up? Any moisture issues?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    752
    I use thermal panning and or sheets of metal often to chase out a cavity to use as a return space. it is by code but others will disagree and say to use hard duct from point a to point b. I was taught this way many years ago and never had any issues with heating ,cooling ,static preasure.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Alberta Canada
    Posts
    2,246

    It is basically paper

    [QUOTE=patchesj;1892761]

    I have used it for about 6 years and have had little to no problems. But if it gets wet you will have to replace it.
    Do it right the first time.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    85
    I have similar material used as return duct panning between the floor joists
    and end stops in my basement. I think it's junk. Moisture eventually enters
    the edge which weakens the mounting causing it to fall off! And where I live
    it's technically not 100% code either, it can't be used for end stops which
    code clearly requires to be tightly fitted wood joist material or sheet metal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Lincoln, Nebraska
    Posts
    1,051
    We use it all the time and have had few problems with it. Around here it is OK as far as codes are concerned. As said if it gets wet it will need to be replaced. Once house is water tight we have had no problems.
    Its a good Life!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Western Kansas
    Posts
    266
    We use it exclusively. Had 2 new home installs with manufactured floor joists and the metal panning went "boing". I run a bead of silicone on the joists before I use an electric stapler to shoot it down. End caps are a piece of cake with 4 inch benders. It doesn't like water.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,405
    I've put up miles of it and rarely have had problems that weren't user or installer related.

    Works good for a reflector when you're taking break out back in the customers lawn chair and working on your tan too! For me, it makes sure I burn evenly lol
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

    VETO PRO PAC, The Official Tool Bag of HVAC-Talk.com

    Testo... you guys rule!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    128
    Quote Originally Posted by amickracing View Post
    I've put up miles of it and rarely have had problems that weren't user or installer related.

    Works good for a reflector when you're taking break out back in the customers lawn chair and working on your tan too! For me, it makes sure I burn evenly lol
    So what should I look out for as a home owner? Anything I need to make sure the installer does? Things I should/should not do?

    Thanks

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