BGE offer $400/yr to install e-saver switch! - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Olympia, Wash.
    Posts
    192

    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by gary_g View Post
    BGE can kiss my a$$.

    72% increase in electric rates thanks to deregulation without competition (way to go Maryland Public Service Commission).

    I live in Abingdon, Harford County.
    So Gary...how do you really feel?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by speedymonk View Post
    So Gary...how do you really feel?
    Speedy:

    Hope all is well is Washington State and that your new Trane is doing its thing.

    As you know, the BGE rate increase caused me to replace a fully functional 21 year-old 7 SEER Trane heat pump with a new 14 SEER Goodman. Increased my energy efficiency by about 40% to combat the 72% rate increase. Payback time is 4 to 5 years on the Goodman. The unit is 1 year-old on 6/22.

    If it weren't for BGE, I would have never learned so much about HVAC, especially from the good people on this site. Good things can indeed come from bad things.

    Take care.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Midwest City, OK
    Posts
    3
    In my area (Oklahoma City) you can choose to particiapte in a variable rate scheme for June through September: 1 - 7 P.M. is 23 cents per KW HR (week days only), 4.5 cents KW HR for the remaining hours (includes weekends and holidays). The normal rate is 8.5 cents per KW HR.

    Swimming pool pump is set on a timer to go off during 1 -7; we cool the house down before 1 P.M. and then turn everthing off until 7 P.M. Downstairs stays comfortable, upstairs (kids' bedrooms) sometimes gets to 82on 100 degree days. Electric bill went from $400/month (2006 summer) to $200/month (2007 Summer) for a 3700 sq. ft. house.

    The 2007 summer was not as hot as 2006 and I also added a radiant barrier in the attic before the 2007 summer.

    I think this scheme saves us money though it takes a little work.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by modman View Post
    In my area (Oklahoma City) you can choose to particiapte in a variable rate scheme for June through September: 1 - 7 P.M. is 23 cents per KW HR (week days only), 4.5 cents KW HR for the remaining hours (includes weekends and holidays). The normal rate is 8.5 cents per KW HR.

    Swimming pool pump is set on a timer to go off during 1 -7; we cool the house down before 1 P.M. and then turn everthing off until 7 P.M. Downstairs stays comfortable, upstairs (kids' bedrooms) sometimes gets to 82on 100 degree days. Electric bill went from $400/month (2006 summer) to $200/month (2007 Summer) for a 3700 sq. ft. house.

    The 2007 summer was not as hot as 2006 and I also added a radiant barrier in the attic before the 2007 summer.

    I think this scheme saves us money though it takes a little work.
    Wow. Those rates are all over the place - 23 cents (outrageous) peak, 4.5 cents weekends and holidays (dirt cheap) and 8.5 cents normal is still cheap.

    Congrads for doing what you did to cut your electric bill in half. Very smart.

    Good luck.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Quote Originally Posted by gary_g View Post
    Wow. Those rates are all over the place - 23 cents (outrageous) peak, 4.5 cents weekends and holidays (dirt cheap) and 8.5 cents normal is still cheap.

    Congrads for doing what you did to cut your electric bill in half. Very smart.

    Good luck.
    Modman was describing Time-of-Day (TOD) rates which some utilities have and some do not. It is typical for the peak time pricing to be sky-high, which generally only reflects the cost of generation at peak time. When off-peak the system can use its most economical marginal generators and the utility's cost of generation is quite low.

    I did some studies on TOD rate proposals when I worked at a utility, and our spread was similar between peak and off-peak. Our goal was not to gouge the customer, but to design rates "revenue neutral" so that approximately half the customers would pay more and half would pay less, if they did not change their existing hours of usage. Of course the expectation is customers *would* work to change their hours of usage, and ideally both buyer and seller would benefit.

    Not too many customers are on a TOD rate though, it is more popular among policy wonks than real world citizens.

    Hope this helps -- Pstu

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