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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    725

    Lets try this ? another way. I am not DIY just asking pipe size ?

    the gas pipe they ran from the meter to my furnace is fairly large alomost all the way to the furnace then sizes down to what they called 1/2" but it has a 7/8" od is this 1/2" black pipe ?

    Now they ran this same size to my Regency heat stove. But then from that pipe to the unit is a flex pipe that measures 1/2" od is this considered 1/2" ?

    And is this suffecient for that heat stove if it is 1/2" ?? The reason I ask is because I wondered why if its sufficent why didnt they run 1/2" all the way from the meter if they T'd it to 1/2" then ran it 25 ft to my heat stove ?

    I purchased the needed parts to convert the Regency stove to NG BUT I am NOT going to do the conversion THEY are and I already paid for it to be done I just wondered what these pipe sizes were considered and how they can call it 1/2" if it measures 7/8?

    Hope this doesn't violate any rules, it surly shouldn't. The reason I ordered the parts is my company has an account with Regency so I got the parts at cost !

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    you need to discuss your issues with your installing contractor. Only they will know all the answers you seek.

    We discourage HOs purchasing parts and having them installed. Cause your contractor can't really warranty the parts since they didn't supply them.
    I fully support the military and the War on Terrorism.


    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    725
    my contractor had me order the parts after I told him we had a house acct with Regency. He is ok with it. I am ONLY asking pipe sizes. I just want to know if blk pipe that measures 7/8" od is considered 1/2" pipe.

    And also is the flex pipe that measures 1/2" od considered 1/2" too ?

    Thats all I was CURIOUS about. Now anyone that knows about blk gas pipe should know this again I am just curious how the sizing goes for gas pipe....

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western NC
    Posts
    2,504
    ok ok ok

    calm down. No need to go off the deep end. I'm sure someone will be able to assist you completely. I don't have all your answers offhand so I will allow someone who does to answer you questions.
    I fully support the military and the War on Terrorism.


    If you don't know, then don't do. If you don't know and still do, then be prepared to pay someone else a lot to undo what you did and then do it right.

    If you do know, then do. But do it right. Otherwise, you may not be doing it long.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,241
    HVAC techs and every one else use different designations for pipe and tubing sizes.
    HVAC always use the tubing outside diameter to size tubing, we use tubing not pipe.
    Plumbers, pipefitters and electricians use the NOMINAL inside diameter of their of their pipes. 1/2" black iron has a nominal inside diameter of 1/2" eventhough it is not ACTUALLY 1/2" with an outside diameter of about 1", pipefitters do the same thing. One difference for plumbing and pipe fitting is with the use of CPVC versus PVC. PVC is measured by inside diameter and CPVC is measured by outside diameter.
    Electricians have 1/2" EMT that measures 7/8" outside diameter and a nominal 1/2" inside but, it's a bit more than an actual 1/2", more like 5/8".
    All pipe and tubing sizes are NOMINAL, not actual but, if you ask for 7/8" ACR copper, you will always get what is known by 7/8" ACR copper and nothing else no matter from whom you purchase it. If you ask for 3/4" PVC, you'll always get 3/4" PVC and nothing else.
    “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I’m not sure about the universe.” —Albert Einstein

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    843
    Why dont you ask the installing contracter what is needed? It sounds like you dont trust him.
    Global Warming or: None like it hot
    No pleasure, no rapture, no exquisite sin greater... than central air. -Dogma

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    443
    Plumbing pipe (water, steam, gas )(including black gas pipe) is sized by the inside diameter. 1/2 is actual inside diameter.

    ACR tubing is sized by the outside diameter. I believe your flex pipe falls into that catagory.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Tucson AZ
    Posts
    166

    Google Pipe Size

    You will see a link to Wikipedia ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nominal_Pipe_Size ) that has more detail than you could ever want, plus a lot of links to engineering data on pipe and tubing data.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    725
    Thanks Jeff and William !

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    66,808
    Gas pipe starts out bigger at the meter and then can be decreased in size as the BTU load and distance is decreased.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,314
    black pipe is sized by the inside diameter, ie 1/2". The amopunt of fuel needed by the fuel burning equipment and how far it has to run, determine the size of the pipe. We use tables for that. In addition, the gas company requires a certain size pipe to feed the house. This will encompass all possible combinations of fuel burning equipment that may be introduced into the home. It also standardized their hookups outside at the meter. For a more detailed explanation, go to school for this like we all did.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dallas & Longview, TX
    Posts
    629
    The meter also has a pressure regulator that can be adjusted to get the desired flow/pressure at the appliance. It isn't rocket science but it is all tied together so adding more flow at one appliance can take away from others and vise versa so the potential for problems is huge.

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