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  1. #1

    Evaporative cooler ducted through a window?

    I am considering purchasing a whole house evaporative cooler. I live in Colorado, near Denver, one of those locations where these things work well - it is rarely humid.

    Most of the local installs I see are either on a frame on the roof and ducted through the attic into the ceiling or pad mounted outside and ducted through a wall. The disadvantage I see with this is that it would be very difficult to seal that hole for those below zero days in February. Even with a cover on the cooler, there still is what amounts to a steel chimney wandering from the living space to the outside.

    My question is this:
    Is it possible to set it up so that it is ducted through a window?

    There are rooms with vinyl slider windows, the bottom of which are close to grade. In hot weather we never open them, as that floor stays relatively cool. I am wondering if vinyl sliding window could be replaced (for the short cooling season) with a glass free blank one containing a hole and attached to a short duct to the evaporative cooler. In fall, the glass window could be swopped back in, the ducted slider thingy hidden away somewhere, cleaned every May and replaced in time for the summer. Am I off my meds here? Should I just go with a permanent install? Anyone ever heard of something like this?
    Thanks,
    John

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    5,990

    Confused The scenarios just keep growing ...

    My question is this:
    Is it possible to set it up so that it is ducted through a window?


    How about underground?
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,396
    There are models meant to go through a window.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Las Vegas,NV
    Posts
    739
    In your climate, a standard aspen pad window cooler will work just fine for you providing your house is not more than about 1600 sqft. With the climate I live in where I am at, aspen pad coolers dont cut it. I prefer the Mastercool units with the 12" pad and precooler, but they have to be ducted to either a ceiling vent in the hallway or a whole seperate duct system for every room. You could install one in a window, you would have to have a stand made and a sleeve and grill to mount to the front.

  5. #5

    thanks for the info

    Hey Sammy,
    thanks for the detailed answer - I really appreciate it.

    The house is 2200 sq feet on two levels, but the bottom floor is completely below ground at one end of the house and at grade at the other (built into a hill.) The bottom floor does not need to be cooled in the summer at all - it is a refuge from the heat. I wonder if that means I can get away with a smaller unit?

    Last summer we had just moved in and we tried a window unit that we had been using in our condo. It is really only intended for one room, and that is all it could cool.

    Dear wife is unhappy with the space pod on the roof idea. DW is also 4 months pregnant so maybe that idea would be an easier sell once August arrives and we can't go upstairs anymore...

    Thanks Again,
    John

    p.s. Dan_sw_fl too thanks for the great advice about ducting it underground! I knew when I saw you were in South West Florida that you would be an expert on both evaporative coolers and cold weather! I will start digging a tunnel under the house today. Now where is that dynamite?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    5,990

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by bunabhucan View Post
    Hey Sammy, thanks for the detailed answer - I really appreciate it.

    The house is 2200 sq feet on two levels, but the bottom floor is completely below ground at one end of the house and at grade at the other (built into a hill.)

    The bottom floor does not need to be cooled in the summer at all - it is a refuge from the heat. I wonder if that means I can get away with a smaller unit?

    p.s. Dan_sw_fl too thanks for the great advice about ducting it underground! I knew when I saw you were in South West Florida that you would be an expert on both evaporative coolers and cold weather!

    I will start digging a tunnel under the house today. Now where is that dynamite?
    No need to dig to get to the basement when the house sits on a hill.
    Nice air distriibution space with easy access to the top of the basement.

    Evaporative coolers work effectively and efficiently here in schools, commercial, and retail applications where proper maintenance is provided.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Clermont, Florida
    Posts
    140
    I live here in NOrthern AZ and they have allot of swamp coolers ducted through the celing what we have to do is put what is called "a cookie sheet" just below the cooler to seal off the duct in the winter. All it is is a flat piece of sheet metal made to go in a slot below the cooler. That along with covering it seems to work pretty good. Some people do get the horizontal draft ones and build stands to have them blow in their window. Well just a little more advice to go on.

  8. #8
    Hi Wspascoe,
    thanks for the information.

    I guess my idea was to exploit the fact that the house is on a slope - there are north and south facing basement windows in the middle of the house with the garden being inches below the sill level.

    When the folks in Northern AZ have the cooler ducted through windows does the contractor replacing the slider with something to route the duct through? Or is it like those window A/C units where the contractor puts in something that expands to fill the gaps?

    I am willing to pay a contractor more for a solution that is removable at the end of the cooling season, I just have never seen such a thing so I don't even know what to ask for when I get a quote.

    Thanks Again,
    John

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