Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: New VS Old

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5

    New VS Old

    Could someone enlighten me on a couple things. First we are looking to replace our condensing unit and air handler. Ours was installed in 83 so it has had a good life. After looking a some different units online just for price ideas I have noticed that all newer models these days come with the coil on the bottom and blower on top. Looking at a couple of my friends furnaces theirs are like mine, with the blower on the bottom, controls on top, and the coil in a fabricated plenum. Does any one know why the coils are on the bottom on newer units?

    I'm trying to find a system that will allow me to put my return duct into the left side of the unit insted of coming up through the bottom of the air handler. I've notice in a couple install manuals that I downloaded that alot of handlers have the return air coming up through the bottom. Are these things that have just changed over the years?

    Any help is always appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,368
    You're probably thinking of a furnace, where the coil is on top of the furnace (either in a case or in the plenum). An air handler in the upflow position has the coil on the bottom and the blower on the bottom; in the downflow position it would be opposite, but the airflow direction would also be opposite. I think you're mixing up furnaces + coils and air handlers personally.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5
    Yup your right I am mixing em up. Sorry about that. With that said can an air handler with heat kits replace an electric furnace? Basically I'm wanting to switch out ours but it seems all the new air handlers are set up with the coil on the bottom and ours on our "furnace" is on the top. We are going to get a couple estimates but I would like to at least act like I know what I'm talking about.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,368
    Do you live in a climate where A/C is used most of the air and heat rarely? If this is the case then an air handler with heat strips probably wouldn't be a bad idea, but electric heat strips can be costly to run.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    georgia
    Posts
    21
    so you are saying that you have a gas furnace and you want to go with an air handler with electric heat? if thats the case then yes you can do that however they will have to pull another wire because a gas furnace runs off 115 volts and an air handler uses 230volts. i dont know what part of the country you live in but theres nothing wrong with a dual fuel unit in my opinion. that would just be a heat pump with gas as emergency heat rather than gas as your only heat. but never the less if you want electric heat rather than the gas furnace you have now yes you can do that. so when they say they will have to pull a new high voltage wire.. thats what they mean about the 115 to 230 volt.. are we on the same page or am i still mis understanding you?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,368
    Cyndian, can you post the model number of your furnace? By electric you mean that it runs off of electric heat strips inside, like this: http://www.warmair.com/html/electric_furnace.htm, right?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5
    Well we have an electric furnace atm. I'm just trying to figure out if we can change it out for an air handler with heat strips. I'm assuming there about the same thing. My only concern was that our coil atm is on top of the furnace and on airhandlers it looks like the coils are on the bottom. Is this going to cause any problems with return air hitting the coil first then proceeding to the blower? Right now it looks like our return air hits our blower first then proceeds to the coil then through the supply ducts. If this isnt going to be a problem I'm assuming I would have to find an air handler that will accept return air in the side since that is how ours is now. Most of the install manuals I have been looking at shows return air coming in through the bottom.

    Sorry for all the newb questions and confusion.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5
    Ryan-- Yup that is exactly what we have now. So would swithing out with an air handler with heat strips be a good replacement? We live in the midwest. Ohio to be exact.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,368
    I would go with a heat pump, gas furnace, or both so that you have a cheaper method of heating your house. A heat pump would probably be good for Ohio. Does it get freezing often? Heat pumps use refrigerant to heat and cool and use an air handler inside (you can add electric heat strips for backup/supplement). I'd get a few estimates and see what companies recommend to you (as I'm sure you plan on doing).

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    5
    Great thanks for the reply Ryan. My husband did mention something about going with a heat pump. He just wasnt sure if they still made electric furnaces. I think that my understanding now is an air handler with heat strips is the same as an electric furnace. Thanks for all your help

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Canton ohio
    Posts
    865
    If set up right,a heat pump does very well in Ohio.
    Go RCR!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event