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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12

    Newbie here, my first gas furnace

    Hey all,
    We've just purchased a new 2700sq ft home, main floor with a finished basement. It currently has the original 50 yr old oil furnace. We are converting to gas and are looking for a new furnace. I had been initially set on the Bryant Plus 95i because the salesman did a helluva job and I liked the variable speed 93% efficiency, but after perusing this site for an hour, the Rheem Mod seems to be highly recommended. Could someone please explain to me in layman's terms the main differences between these two models? I know actual prices can't be discussed here, but generally, are they equivalently priced or is one considerably more expensive than the other. We would like to have some sort of filtration system, as we own 3 dogs and 2 cats, to cut down on the dander. Also, as we live in the Pacific Northwest, we don't plan on having an AC system, so a furnace that could also circulate/cool air would be great. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    One other quick question, I'm looking at the local dealers on the Rheem website and they have them broken down into two categories:

    1. Independent Area Rheem Team Top Contractors
    2. Independent Area Rheem Contractors

    What's the difference and is there an advantage of going with one group over the other?

    Thanks!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    999
    Quote Originally Posted by ronscottf View Post
    Hey all,
    We've just purchased a new 2700sq ft home, main floor with a finished basement. It currently has the original 50 yr old oil furnace. We are converting to gas and are looking for a new furnace. I had been initially set on the Bryant Plus 95i because the salesman did a helluva job and I liked the variable speed 93% efficiency, but after perusing this site for an hour, the Rheem Mod seems to be highly recommended. Could someone please explain to me in layman's terms the main differences between these two models? I know actual prices can't be discussed here, but generally, are they equivalently priced or is one considerably more expensive than the other. We would like to have some sort of filtration system, as we own 3 dogs and 2 cats, to cut down on the dander. Also, as we live in the Pacific Northwest, we don't plan on having an AC system, so a furnace that could also circulate/cool air would be great. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
    The Rheem Mod furnace operates with 13 stages of heat, when combined with their modulating thermostat. The furnace operates (almost constantly, depending on outside conditions), but provides a gentle heat which adjusts automaticallly to equal the heat loss of your home. This provides the ultimate in comfort, eliminating that 'cold' feeling, waiting for the heat to come on.

    To the unacquainted, it may seem that the furnace is using more gas, but actually, the amount of gas used over time will be the same as a furnace with 1, 2, or 3 stages of heat (assuming the same efficiency). You might actually save a little gas as 'standby' losses will be lessened.

    Bryant furnaces are made by Carrier and are the same as their models. I'm not familiar with their model numbers as to which one you would be getting, but they would probably be 2 or 3 stage. The 3 stage is termed a modulating furnace, by does not operate like the Rheem.

    As far as dealers go, all mfgs. have 'authorized' dealers. My personal experience with 'Top Team' dealers has varied widely. That's a good place to start, but you need to judge them on their knowledge and professionalism. A good way to do that is spend lot's of time here and educate yourself.

    Who knows, you might even catch one making a 'misleading' statement.

    Good luck.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    s chester county,pa
    Posts
    144
    did you consider going with a heat pump?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    2,190
    ronscottf

    While Rheem and York Mods are great heating equipment, they are better suited for areas of country that have a long and harsh winter heating season. They would be overkill for the Pacific NW that has a relatively mild winter heating season.

    If you plan on having nat gas used for other reasons than heating and/or just like nat gas heating, then I would go with an 80% eff var spd model paired with a high eff heat pump to leverage what I believe are reasonable electric rates for your area.

    IMO

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,038
    Whats your electric rate including all transmission fee's and taxes.

    And what will be your gas rate.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdunes View Post

    If you plan on having nat gas used for other reasons than heating and/or just like nat gas heating, then I would go with an 80% eff var spd model paired with a high eff heat pump to leverage what I believe are reasonable electric rates for your area.

    IMO
    Hey all, thanks for the responses. So, why go with only an 80% eff var spd model as opposed to a higher 95% or so eff model? It seems as if 95% is better, yes?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    Whats your electric rate including all transmission fee's and taxes.

    And what will be your gas rate.
    Don't know, sorry.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by wogpa67 View Post
    did you consider going with a heat pump?
    Here's where my newbieness comes out....how would a heat pump help/aid/differ from a standard furnace?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,038
    It would heat your house during the milder temps, istead of using gas. Depending on your rates, ir could substancially cheaper, using a dual fuel.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,559
    They are all good equipment. Go with what you feel comfortable with and what you can afford. Don't buy more than you can afford and it generally works a lot better IMO.

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