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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by timby View Post
    What about the operating panel of the sliding glass door installed on the outside. That was a F&J hallmark.
    I have two sets of sliding glass doors installed this way. They are made by Peachtree out of Georgia. When I called them to inquire about parts, I asked them about this subject, and they told me that these doors stand up to high winds better.

    I thought it was funky when I first saw the doors installed that way, but I'm used to them now.

    Take care.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,296
    Quote Originally Posted by timby View Post
    What about the operating panel of the sliding glass door installed on the outside. That was a F&J hallmark.

    While the fur down was a good idea they didn't manager to get the air to flow through the ducts properly and I'm going to have to have someone come out and run new duct. I have some damage in the ducts and the cost to tear down the Sheetrock and do the repairs, then replace Sheetrock is very cost prohibited.

    I could write a novel on the bad building practices of F&J.
    Yep. Ours had that unique feature, plus the sucker was 12 feet long!

    The aluminum had a gold finish on it. It was adjacent to a kitchen that had a slider window that came all the way down level with the countertop and kitchen sink. Wonderful for passing food across the bar on the outside of that window...lousy for splash marks on the window glass!

    Did your kitchen also have the furred down ceiling with almost an acre of frosted plexiglas panels with fluorescent lights above in a cove? Our fixtures had eight foot long tubes in them...always fun trying to get one of those home from the home center...intact.

    Our model also had the wooden hopper windows made by Andersen...they were thermally better than the aluminum sliders, but if you ever painted their frames, what fun.

    More entries for your novel, maybe?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Just North of Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    Yep. Ours had that unique feature, plus the sucker was 12 feet long!

    The aluminum had a gold finish on it. It was adjacent to a kitchen that had a slider window that came all the way down level with the countertop and kitchen sink. Wonderful for passing food across the bar on the outside of that window...lousy for splash marks on the window glass!

    Did your kitchen also have the furred down ceiling with almost an acre of frosted plexiglas panels with fluorescent lights above in a cove? Our fixtures had eight foot long tubes in them...always fun trying to get one of those home from the home center...intact.

    Our model also had the wooden hopper windows made by Andersen...they were thermally better than the aluminum sliders, but if you ever painted their frames, what fun.

    More entries for your novel, maybe?
    Shophound

    You must of had the luxury model, while I had the gold 6 foot sliding door (installed backwards) I had the cheap single pane aluminum windows that leaked air and rain. I didn't get the furred down kitchen ceiling but did get the cabinets that they took base molding and put that cheap frosted Eisen (SP?) glass to make the doors. Don't forget the gold shag carpet and flocked wall paper in the bathrooms.

    Awwww ... the good ole days ....

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,296
    Quote Originally Posted by timby View Post
    Shophound

    You must of had the luxury model, while I had the gold 6 foot sliding door (installed backwards) I had the cheap single pane aluminum windows that leaked air and rain. I didn't get the furred down kitchen ceiling but did get the cabinets that they took base molding and put that cheap frosted Eisen (SP?) glass to make the doors. Don't forget the gold shag carpet and flocked wall paper in the bathrooms.

    Awwww ... the good ole days ....
    This was our model:



    When my wife bought it (before we met), she had whatever carpeting was in there ripped out, and the hall bath wallpaper was painted over. Master bath wallpaper was hideous...we removed it before putting the house up for sale. The master bath itself was DINKY! I served in the Navy...the smallest head on the ship was larger than that MASTER bathroom! I could barely turn around in there.

    Oh yeah, those cabinet doors...molding with amber plastic panels that had the concentric circles embossed in the plastic...lovely. And the stamped metal tiles for a splashboard on the walls over the flecked or boomerang Formica countertops. I can see Dwell Magazine now just raving over Fox & Jacobs design features...............not!
    The living area was originally sunken but my wife had it filled in when she recarpeted the house.
    The neighborhood where this house sits has declined in recent years. When I moved there after getting married it was pretty decent but it was changing. It is now destined to add to Plano's growing ghetto real estate, unfortunately. The city that grew at an incredible clip in the 70's and 80's now has miles of cheaply constructed housing facing the relentless pressures of aging and changing demographics.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Just North of Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    97
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    This was our model:



    When my wife bought it (before we met), she had whatever carpeting was in there ripped out, and the hall bath wallpaper was painted over. Master bath wallpaper was hideous...we removed it before putting the house up for sale. The master bath itself was DINKY! I served in the Navy...the smallest head on the ship was larger than that MASTER bathroom! I could barely turn around in there.

    Oh yeah, those cabinet doors...molding with amber plastic panels that had the concentric circles embossed in the plastic...lovely. And the stamped metal tiles for a splashboard on the walls over the flecked or boomerang Formica countertops. I can see Dwell Magazine now just raving over Fox & Jacobs design features...............not!
    The living area was originally sunken but my wife had it filled in when she recarpeted the house.
    The neighborhood where this house sits has declined in recent years. When I moved there after getting married it was pretty decent but it was changing. It is now destined to add to Plano's growing ghetto real estate, unfortunately. The city that grew at an incredible clip in the 70's and 80's now has miles of cheaply constructed housing facing the relentless pressures of aging and changing demographics.
    Shophound

    Definitely the high priced unit ....

    I see you had the real (imported brick) Accents around the windows and the wood extension to help hold up the 3/8 plywood decked roof. So many in our neighborhood had to pay extra to get that rotted wood removed from the exterior. Wasn't it lovely that it just rested on the brick veneer and had no structural integrity.

    I'm currently having the roof replaced because of hail damage and the insurance adjuster suggested that I have another layer of ply laid over the old to strengthen the roof structure (at my expense).

    It really wonderful when I have repair folks out and they suggest that maybe it would be better to tear down whatever and start over since so much is sub-par building practices.

  6. #19

    Question TVX Valve

    Not to drift off the T&J commentary, but I did NOT go with the TVX valve. I did, however, ask him about it.

    This is what the good dealer told me, and I quote:

    "I would be happy to install one, but that's all I will say about it." After pressing him on it, his opinion was that since it was a matched split system, the orifice was properly sized. He said there would be a slight improvement in efficiency, but it would be more than offset by increased complexity, aka repair costs.

    The installers apparently throttled max fan speed down from 20K to 18-18.5K. The reason, I was told, was to address our area's high humidity (armpit of SE Texas was in reference to heat and humidity - and smell from our lovely petro-chem economy!).

    My original plan was to improve the efficiency of the building (new windows, doors, insulation) then move on to the HVAC. That plan did what most plans do - fall apart - given the failure of the old system! So it's likely insulation first (currently have about 10" of the old rockwool stuff - I would hate to meet one of those sheep at night ) then on to the original single glaze windows and four double french doors - oh what fun!

    Any additional help on the TVX dilemma and blower speed issues would be appreciated!

    Ciao

    P.S. - Having been up and running for about 24 hours now, I can't believe how quite this system is. I can't even hear it come on! The same is true outside - a nice touch since this rascal sits right on the other side of my headboard in my bedroom! It's also great that my "comfort" level is now at a higher temp (using same stat). I guess the old system had been on the decline for some time.
    Last edited by SETexan; 05-22-2008 at 11:57 AM. Reason: Typo oops

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,296
    TXV's, if installed with care, are rock solid metering devices. Your local supermarket would not do without them. Your favorite restaurant's ice machine likely uses one. Go pick up a six pack at the Stop n' Rob, likely a TXV helping to keep the brewskies cool.

    Main killers of TXV's are improper installation techniques and trash from improper service techniques elsewhere in the system. Seldom are the components of the TXV itself to blame, but it can happen...mainly power head fails or thermal bulb leaks out its little charge. No biggie to fix, really.

    That being said, you may want to measure your indoor temperature and humidity levels with your new system now running to gain an ongoing metric for your indoor conditions. In my own home I'm running a 10 SEER condenser hooked to a newer evaporator with a TXV. Single stage, nothing fancy. Yesterday, with temps around 90 and outdoor humidity levels climbing, the system easily held 75 in the house and relative humidity was <45&#37;. System ran roughly 3 ten minute cycles per hour. Of course I've also added insulation in the attic and radiant barrier, which effectively gives me a capacity boost to my system without doing any mechanical alterations to it. Ducts that run through an attic with radiant barrier on the roof deck won't gain as much heat as ducts in attics with no radiant barrier. Result is the cold air leaving the evaporator gains less heat before it reaches the supply vents.

    Bells and whistles...save it for the local orchestra.

    But I do think TXV's are a worthwhile investment. Refrigeration systems tend to like them for longevity reasons as well as efficiency.

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