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  1. #1
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    Thumbs down The rich get richer

    Gas and diesel prices continue to escalate at the pump. Unemployment moving upwards. Storm clouds of a recession still gathering. Corporate balance sheets such as these are truly a disturbing mile marker. Not only this mega giant but it's compradres in the same business are making out like bandits. Just an indicator that Bush and his band of thieves are going to get what they can, while they can.


    http://money.aol.com/news/articles/_...01114609990027

  2. #2
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    I'm still waiting for some proof that Bush has something to do with this.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_fridge View Post
    I'm still waiting for some proof that Bush has something to do with this.
    The whole government has something to do with it. They don't want to seriously address the problem. Because, hey, it's a free market, who cares if the average American can barely afford to drive to work, as long as the oil guys keep getting richer, that's all that matters. So we'll keep paying more and more, more people will lose their jobs, and won't be able to put gas in their cars to go look for another job. And even if it could be proved that Bush had sometihng to do with it, you'd say it was a lie anyway.

  4. #4
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    This game called capitolism is sometimes not very good looking. That's because it is essentially survival of the fittest.

    The regulatory measures that it would require to reign in big oil scare people with good reason. Once you start down that road, who knows where it will end.

    Regulation, my friend, is one very big reason US jobs are lost to other places in the world. Why face stiff regulations when you can go somewhere else? Of course, in my opinion the decision to leave should be based on at least *some* ethics with regards to slave labor and the like.

    It's a big messy situation, I agree. But to simply observe that politicians aren't interested in doing anything presents an unfair view in my opinion. Like it or not, our way is capitolism; with all the warts that go with it.

    I'll give you this much; I don't particularly like the big margins being reported by big oil right now. Further, there is no "fair competition" in the market because no one is going to adjust prices down in order to sell more gas. Gas will sell at current prices; it's obvious (even though we whine about it). In a free market, the only way this problem goes away is if demand dies.

    Regulation is one REALLY BIG can of worms that I'd need a super-compelling reason to support. I'm not sure that reason exists. Because, again, once you start down that road, well, I cringe just thinking about it.

    What happens when the government decides that the prices that YOU charge are unfair to consumers, eh? Mighty slippery slope.
    "Social networking" is an oxymoron.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by air311 View Post
    The whole government has something to do with it. They don't want to seriously address the problem. Because, hey, it's a free market, who cares if the average American can barely afford to drive to work, as long as the oil guys keep getting richer, that's all that matters. So we'll keep paying more and more, more people will lose their jobs, and won't be able to put gas in their cars to go look for another job. And even if it could be proved that Bush had sometihng to do with it, you'd say it was a lie anyway.
    I agree that the government hasn't properly addressed the problem. The politicians are more interested in padding their pockets than doing what's right for the country. But I have yet to see any evidence that Bush has any direct connection to rising oil prices.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrogdog View Post
    This game called capitolism is sometimes not very good looking. That's because it is essentially survival of the fittest.

    The regulatory measures that it would require to reign in big oil scare people with good reason. Once you start down that road, who knows where it will end.

    Regulation, my friend, is one very big reason US jobs are lost to other places in the world. Why face stiff regulations when you can go somewhere else? Of course, in my opinion the decision to leave should be based on at least *some* ethics with regards to slave labor and the like.

    It's a big messy situation, I agree. But to simply observe that politicians aren't interested in doing anything presents an unfair view in my opinion. Like it or not, our way is capitolism; with all the warts that go with it.

    I'll give you this much; I don't particularly like the big margins being reported by big oil right now. Further, there is no "fair competition" in the market because no one is going to adjust prices down in order to sell more gas. Gas will sell at current prices; it's obvious (even though we whine about it). In a free market, the only way this problem goes away is if demand dies.

    Regulation is one REALLY BIG can of worms that I'd need a super-compelling reason to support. I'm not sure that reason exists. Because, again, once you start down that road, well, I cringe just thinking about it.

    What happens when the government decides that the prices that YOU charge are unfair to consumers, eh? Mighty slippery slope.
    I agree that regulating big oil would create an even bigger mess. But there has to be sometihng that can be done. My point was the government isn't even trying. There has to be some kind of deal the government could make with big oil to control the prices. I have no idea what, and sadly the governemnt doesn't either..or they do and just aren't willing. What's amazing is this is an election year, and nobody seems to have a plan..kinda strange.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by air311 View Post
    I agree that regulating big oil would create an even bigger mess. But there has to be sometihng that can be done. My point was the government isn't even trying. There has to be some kind of deal the government could make with big oil to control the prices. I have no idea what, and sadly the governemnt doesn't either..or they do and just aren't willing. What's amazing is this is an election year, and nobody seems to have a plan..kinda strange.
    Well, I am at a loss to suggest a course of action, as you are. So I can hardly get down on politicians for not coming up with a plan. It would be different if the path was clear, but it really isn't.
    "Social networking" is an oxymoron.

  8. #8
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    And, when no one has a clear idea of what it would take to bring about a solution, by all means let's just blame it on Bush.

    See, not logical is it? Without researching it, how much more efficient are vehicle regulations (mpg) today compared to the huge energy crisis back in the 70's? We keep hearing that the only way to get over this is to mandate better fuel efficiency. How far do these people think that will go? I mean, there have been increases but, are they THAT much?
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  9. #9
    When the dollar is weak we pay more. When the dollar is strong we pay less.
    We have been so accustomed to the dollar being the king currency around the globe therefor setting the standard, that is no longer the case....so we pay more because our currency's value is worth less abroad.
    Not saying that is the only factor, but its a big one.

  10. #10
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    Found this. http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_vehicles/fuel_economy/
    Instead, federal fuel economy standards must be increased to over 40 mpg by 2015 and 55 mpg by 2025. Adopting fuel-efficient vehicle technologies to meet these standards would save three times more oil by 2025 than we could recover from the Arctic refuge. And tapping technology avoids the environmental degradation and air pollution that accompany increased drilling.

    Wow. Wonder which cars today actually have those efficiencies.
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

  11. #11
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    Toyota's hybrid, the Prius, comes in at around 44 mpg overall. It's the most fuel efficient car on the planet at the moment.
    "Social networking" is an oxymoron.

  12. #12
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    The new VW diesels average around 42 I think. And much funner to drive than the Prius. That thing is as exciting as a toaster.

  13. #13
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    For some reason I thought the efficiency regulations were talking about the actual efficiency of the gasoline combustion engine, not in conjunction with electric or other hybrid style propulsion methods.

    I mean, my 10-speed gets pretty good gas mileage too
    Do not argue with an idiot. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience.

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