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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    phillipsburg, nj
    Posts
    72
    and thesheetmetalshop.com has a library with a lot of the old books. and some guys sell DVDs on how to do some of the lost art of the trade

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    phillipsburg, nj
    Posts
    72
    and look for a book sheet-metal pattern drafting & shop problems by James S Daugherty that was the book i had as apprentice

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    Thanks zzonko, That was a great website you sent me to, ordered the layout book and a couple of tools that were discounted. Sure miss my old sheet metal guy! His metal work was like finish cabinet work. He truly was an artiste! He had to get out back in 2008 because of down turn in new construction,and bad economy.And thanks to the rest of you men for your input. Kimosobee

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    I've been looking for DVD even VHS ,I haven't been able find any> I' m going to check out that website you posted Thanks, Kimosobee

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    3,259
    All you "need" in residential if you're doing service and changeouts is 4' break, a way to do Pittsburgs and then buy s-lock and drive by the stick.

    Simple square fittings(no roundbacks or rounded throats) are incredibly easy to learn if you are somewhat intelligent and can pick up new things decently. Once you pick it up it's like riding a bike, you don't forget how to do it, might be a little slower after while but can still do it.

    Here's a super easy way to do a transition: 20x12-20x8
    You can make this in two halves or a three sided piece with one more side piece.

    Start with the larger duct at the bottom of your piece of metal(this is the three sided peice) use a scribe to mark 1" along the bottom a little larger than your layout, from left to right you have 12+20+12, that's the duct size make a dimple at each measurement on your scribe line and double check with a ruler.

    Now you know the approximate width of your piece, cut it out but with an extra 1 1/4" on both sides, straight edged cuts!!!(explanation coming). Now you decide how long your transition is, in this case I would make it 16" inches. Remember how you scribed a 1" line at the bottom? You will do that again at the top after cutting it to length, so your piece is 16" from scribe to scribe with an extra inch or makeup on each end. So cut it at 18" and scribe your top with 1".

    Now you have your rough cut but squared corners(meaning they make 90* angle) piece with bottom marked, we want to get the top marked now. Take your ruler and measure from left side to each of the dimples that marks the 20" part, they should be the middle two dimples of your four. Dimple these two at the same measurement but on the top scribe. Now at the top measure out from each dimple you just made and make a dimple at 8" on the scribe. You now have the top marked at 8-20-8 and the bottom marked at 12-20-12. It's time to mark our sides or seams.

    Line your ruler up with the outside top and bottom dimple and make a line from one dimple to the other, repeat on the other side. Before you continue measure the distance between these dimples and write it down.

    You have everything marked now except the 1" Pitt line for your Pitt seam. It's important that the 1" line be parallel to your outside scribe you just made or your piece will get screwy. So turn your ruler perpendicular to your outside lines and measure from somewhere in the middle of the ruler(makes it easier to eyeball perpendicular) out an 1" and dimple, do this close to the top and bottom, now line up with your new dimples and scribe a line all the way across the metal, this is your next cut line on both sides.

    Now that it's cut out you want to get your piece ready for forming and that means cleaning up the corners and such. All 1/4" or 1" Pitt seams get cut straight and perpendicular to the line. So on your 1", cut perpendicular and to the corners. On the s-lock or drive corners you cut roughly 30* angle so that there won't be any interference when hooking up the duct.

    Now you run the 1" sides, not the S!! Through the Pittsburgh. Cross break each section corner to corner. Bend up the sides to 90*. Your smaller dimension is the drive side so bend those too. your done with that piece.

    Now you remember that measurement we took and wrote down? That's the true length on the last side to be made, scribe to scribe so add one inch on each end for S. It's 20" wide plus a 1/4" on each side that will insert into the Pitt. So cut out your metal after scribing all your lines, clean up the corners, remember we want straight perpendicular cuts on the 1/4"s. Cross break, bend the 1/4"s 90* and bend one S in 4" and the other out 4" to line up the piece when it's put together. Check to make sure the 1" pitt that got folded in the machine has a clear pocket to receive the 1/4", start at one end and use a sheet metal hammer(pointy end) to sink the 1/4" in the pocket. Once sunk use the flat side of hammer to fold over each end of the pitt sticking up, now use the broad side of hammer to fold over the entire seam.

    You now have a nice transition piece and know the basics. Experiment from there. Remember that every individual side gets a seam makeup, so if you make a 4 sided piece, 2 will have pitt sides and 2 will have 1/4" sides. Build your flat sides first and you will get the true length of the transitioning sides as we did above. No flat sides is a little trickier and requires pythagoreans theorem to get your true length. A2+B2=C2 where 2 means squared.

    That was kinda long, hopefully I typed everything correctly : /. It just takes practice and take it slow at first with lots of double measuring and making sure you have your seams right.

    Cut your drive two more inches than the duct it's going on and cut your s between a 1/4"-1/2" less than the piece it's going on.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    Thanks Mason, You must type with all your fingers to give me that response. Just kidding! I printed it. It was to long to remember. I appreciate your detailed description, I don't have a Pittsburgh machine.I think I'll be creating a female connection on each side of the 3 sided furnace transition and or use S's for final connection. I have the opportunity to buy a pittsburgh, but for now it doesn't fit my budget. Thanks for help. Kimosobee
    Last edited by kimosobee; 03-18-2013 at 12:58 AM.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    Thanks njtinman. I went to that website to check it out ,I found 1 layout from 1891.There's alot there . I'll have to take the time to go through the complete sight, Thanks for your input. All of you men have been very helpfull and I appreciate your responses. Kimosobee

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    Thanks Drazen, My friend from the other side of the world,I will be looking up Leo Meyer also!
    Kimosobee

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    East Grand Forks, MN
    Posts
    1,375
    If your interested doing pittsburgh seams using a break and mallet check out the videos on sheetmetal on youtube..
    I can't remember which video, but it's there..

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    phillipsburg, nj
    Posts
    72
    you can also do a double seam on fittings

  11. #24
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Western, KY
    Posts
    3,259
    Quote Originally Posted by kimosobee View Post
    Thanks Mason, You must type with all your fingers to give me that response. Just kidding! I printed it. It was to long to remember. I appreciate your detailed description, I don't have a Pittsburgh machine.I think I'll be creating a female connection on each side of the 3 sided furnace transition and or use S's for final connection. I have the opportunity to buy a pittsburgh, but for now it doesn't fit my budget. Thanks for help. Kimosobee
    Actually, every post I have ever made on this site has been on an iPhone with my thumbs, I'm pretty good at it now. That's how hard core I am : ). Someday I'll be big time with a laptop(just think what I'll post then!) but for now all that money has been going into tools.

    I made a thread about an area for pro members that was solely for instructional videos and I think sheet metal fab would be a huge asset in that section.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    147
    I tried to get into the the educational area to find the video's they have but I couldn't get in.

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