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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5

    60,000 vs 80,000 btu

    I had four estimates done on a furnace replacement and I think I finally decided on the company. My question is three of the companies suggested an 80,000 btu furnace and the company I want recommends a 60,000 btu trane furnace, (he did a heat/loss on the home). He said he could put in a 80,000 for the same price as the other companies, but thinks its a mistake. His calculations show I need 58,000 btu. He said he is so positive that it is the right size that he will write it in the contract that they will replace the furnace free if it doesn't adequately heat the home.

    The home is 1400 square foot with very good insulation. I feel more comfortable with the larger size furnace, but wondering if there is any negatives to oversizing it to 80,000. He would give me a free upgrade to the 80,000 to match the price of the other companies.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    13
    It takes alot more information to determine the size needed. Heat/cool load. Climate/ Where you live. Average out door temp. Blower size, ..............
    Get another opinion... free estimates are free!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,642
    was the guy who says 60,000 the only one to do heat calc??

    if he is willing to guarantee in writing and you are comfortable with him, then he would be my choice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fayetteville,Arkansas
    Posts
    1,427
    I can't speak for everyone but when I recommend the 80,000 btu I'm not suggesting that is the amount delivered it's just how the factory has it sized.
    An 80% efficient furnace means it's 20% inefficient so you lose 16,000 btu to inefficiency and are left with 64,000 btu delivered.
    If you choose not to decide you still have made a choice.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    91
    As a homeowner, if he was the only one who did a heat/loss, then I'd be more comfortable with his analysis. That said, even the best case Trane is going to put you right at your heat loss figure.

    If he's backing it up in writing, and willing to put in the 80,000 if you are not happy, then like the other poster said, go for it. What sucks is you probably won't know for sure for another 8 months or so, depending on your location.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5
    I am not sure if the other companies did a heat loss, but all four companies asked similar questions and all pretty much came up with same duct work/design changes. I already decided on the company because I am most comfortable with their established company, brand of furnace, and the time spent in estimating my house. I am in central NY so we have cold winters. I would not pay anything extra to go to the 80,000 since he is price matching the other three companies. I am just wondering if I would have any major complications if it oversized. I am planning on purchasing the 10 year parts and labor warranty.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,642
    find out if the 60 or 80 #s are input or output.

    if input go with the 80,000 furnace.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    91
    I think oversizing can cause shorter run times, which ultimately shorten the life of the heat exchanger.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Fayetteville,Arkansas
    Posts
    1,427
    My point was his load calc determined a need for 58,000 btu heat. The 80,000 btu furnaces deliver 64,000 btu. I wonder if when the trane guy shows up to do the install is going to have an 80k btu furnace with him or a 100k. Or is going to show up with a 60k that will only deliver 48,000 btu which is going to come up short.
    If you choose not to decide you still have made a choice.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    39
    If it's 60,000 (100%) then you are ok. If it's 60,000 (80 %) then you are not ok.

    Ask him what % it is.

    T

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    13
    I'm from Texas so we don't know much about REAL heating but I would say that being oversized isn't a real problem like you would have with air-conditioning being oversized. As long as the blower is right and you won't have a problem in the summer. Remember that most 10 year parts and labor warranty are only for failed components, not if it is sized wrong and doesn't cool/heat properly.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    91
    Upstate NY, wouldn't you want a 90+% eff. furnace?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by morr1s View Post
    IHis calculations show I need 58,000 btu.
    The capacity listed by the manufacturer is the INPUT btuh. Unless the guy was planning on piping the exhaust into the return to make it a 100% efficient furnace, you need an 80,000 btuh furnace to satisfy a 58,000 btuh load.

    Note: The bit about piping the exhaust into the return was a joke, don't do that.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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