How Many BTU's Per Sq. FT? - Page 2
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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Morgantown,WV
    Posts
    6
    1

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Morgantown,WV
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by oe2x View Post
    While the heat pump may give me less expensive heating, it's not the kind of heat I want. I have minimum 10' high ceilings in all the rooms, so the idea of heating the lower half of the room is appealing.
    "Not the kind of heat"?? Do you mean amount of heat? As for the high ceilings, heat rises, so you will want floor registers in the lower part of house. You might consider having 2 systems put in. One for lower, one for upper. The HVAC contractor will need to see the blueprints for your house, and then should be able to determine what is right for your particular needs.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    northern mass
    Posts
    411
    Myself....HUGE radiant fan. I love it, consider it the best. Almost every home I did for my last company was radiant heat throughout. And for that reason, I gained a great respect for someone who can install it perfectly. But a havn't met many who can. And like others said before me....how can they be installing it now...when there is no Manual J in their possesion ? No design for the radiant can be had if there isn't a detailed load calc to go from. The layout design for each room can be different, the spacing, the btu's and temp....everything needs to come from the load calc. and blueprints. You might want to jump into the middle of your project and find out what's going on.
    I take it the heat pump going with your a/c is your second stage back-up......but where did the a/c size and design come from ? Where are people getting all this info from ?....someone has to have a load calc on your home !

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,271
    All I can add is I hope there's insulation planned between the radiant loop and the ground for the slab located loops. Would kinda suck to be putting heat into the ground vs. the house.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    42
    Electric boiler? If your out in the boonies and your only other option is propane, I'd consider geo-thermal HP for my heating plant. The major benefit of a HP system is the efficiency you achieve over risistance electric.

    Just my $0.02

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    132
    Radiant is a nice secondary heat, dont forget you have to leave it on for it to work correctly, the shoulder months with cool mornings and 65 to 70 by 11:00 , counter productive, go with the heat pump put radiant on second stage.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    watertown ct
    Posts
    134

    btus per foot

    Do a accurate heat load or go to a supplier that sells radiant wirsbo viega zurn alot of them will do the load for you and give you a material list as for concrete floors are they slab on grade are they gyp crete radiant is more efficient and a nicer heat use a condensing gas boiler that modulates run it off out door reset with individual room sensor if you have alot of glass you have to be careful run constant circulation and replace the heat as it is lost don't try to play catchup on and off because if the slab cools down during the day due to the sun when the sun sets it will take a while to heat the slab back up if you do it constant circ with a room sensor and either a mixing valve or injection pump it will change water temp depending on the load and will keep slab warm but wont over heat the space also you can add a indirect water heater to the boiler as well if its a slab on grade the slab will give of heat for a long time if it was me i wouldn't be turning it on and off if its a weekend home set back the room sensor and program it to go back to optimum temp on Thursday night.I would set it and forget like ronco[

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    885
    Quote Originally Posted by oe2x View Post
    I am building a house in northern Oregon that is about 4,000 sq. ft, on an exposed hill and it has lots of windows. While we get snow, the average temps during the winter rarely go below 20 F.

    The house will have concrete floors with radiant heating. it will have five zones.

    My installer tells me to figure that I need a boiler that will have a capacity of 25 btu's per sq. ft. of house or approximately an output of 105,000 btus.

    I've heard from other sources that I should expect to have a capacity of less than half that .

    Which is correct?
    Where in oregon are you? I specialize in geo-applications of all types including geo radiant applications
    We also do radiant systems with other types of water heating. My email is in my public profile. I recently did a 4500 sq ft home with a 92+ eff modulating boiler system/radiant that was only 80,000 btu's. had 7000 feet of tubing. Drop me a line with your phone number, maybe I can help.
    Genius = The guy who can do anything...except make a living!

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