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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    Atlanta(metro)
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    55

    Cool Bad Architect - what should I do?

    I've caught a couple of different errors on the blueprints that the architect had to replace. I've talked to him a couple of times and I'm not confident in his knowledge. Should I go back over everything (calculations etc) for him or not? He's now talking about a gas package roof top unit with heat strips - hmmm

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    388
    From a construction law standpoint, the architect/engineer is the design professional. They carrier professional liability insurance in case they F-up so the Building Owner doesn't get left w/ the costs of their design errors.

    The contractor is obligated to follow the contract documents (drawings & specs). IMO, unless the Building Owner is a very good customer of yours, why stick your neck out anymore than you have too....not too mention wasting time!

    BTW...a bad architect/engineer = changeorders for you!
    Last edited by flyrfan; 03-27-2008 at 05:32 PM. Reason: Edited

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    388
    .
    Last edited by flyrfan; 03-27-2008 at 05:32 PM. Reason: deleted

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Atlanta(metro)
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    55
    Quote Originally Posted by flyrfan View Post
    From a construction law standpoint, the architect/engineer is the design professional. They carrier professional liability insurance in case they F-up so the Building Owner doesn't get left w/ the costs of their design errors.

    The contractor is obligated to follow the contract documents (drawings & specs). IMO, unless the Building Owner is a very good customer of yours, why stick your neck out anymore than you have too....not too mention wasting time!

    BTW...a bad architect/engineer = changeorders for you!
    Dont know about here in Ga but I did a job in NC where I was told I was responsible as the licensed contractor to make sure everything was to code.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by reliablehvac View Post
    Dont know about here in Ga but I did a job in NC where I was told I was responsible as the licensed contractor to make sure everything was to code.
    I would think code means installed correctly. In my book installed correctly and operating to design conditions are 2 different ends of the spectrum. If you feel there are design issues that may fall back on you and not the one who designed the system I'd walk away from it. I do not know any gas fired RTU's that have space in them to add ele. heat. Good luck.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,432
    Quote Originally Posted by reliablehvac View Post
    I've caught a couple of different errors on the blueprints that the architect had to replace. I've talked to him a couple of times and I'm not confident in his knowledge.
    1. Redesign
    2. or Take responsibility
    3. or Move on
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    Typically in the specifications Somewhere it will say that you are responsible in some fashion that yo dont really follow. Contractor must insure that installation meets all local building codes or some other bs line. So why the F*** did they hire an engineer anyway? What you need to do is to look over the job, if any questions, submit RFI, and get clarification in writing, otherwise its useless later. If you have objections, you have to get them out there or otherwise you'll be stuck in the middle like it or not. The days of putting it in exactly like the prints show and leaving are pretty much over, in many cases now you wont get paid unless the system is proven to work.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SW Florida
    Posts
    1,264
    1.change order$

    2.change order$

    3.change order$


    Build to plans, follow local codes

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,795
    Either email your questions to the architech.
    Or write it out in your qualifications.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2,609
    Create a "Paper Trail" when you email, CC a copy to another computer you have good access to. IE from your work computer, to the PE, CC to your home computer. Registered letters, but they can say someting else was in the envelope. Written, signed and PE stamped change orders are a must. Also digital images have been thrown out in court, disposable cameras and poloroids are best. Guard your prints with your life or get a working copy made at Kinkos

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,720
    Quote Originally Posted by flyrfan View Post
    From a construction law standpoint, the architect/engineer is the design professional. They carrier professional liability insurance in case they F-up so the Building Owner doesn't get left w/ the costs of their design errors.

    The contractor is obligated to follow the contract documents (drawings & specs). IMO, unless the Building Owner is a very good customer of yours, why stick your neck out anymore than you have too....not too mention wasting time!

    BTW...a bad architect/engineer = changeorders for you!
    It's called Errors and Omissions Insurance. If it's a stamped drawing, the Engineers responsible. But I would still document EVERY correspondence to the Engineer that describes every issue in detail.
    Coincidentally, we just had the same situation. The building owner pissed off the architect, who would not return the general contractor's calls about the MANY screw ups on the stamped drawings. I stopped our job mobilization. I contacted our Engineer who would not revise another Engineer's drawing. He said his insurance would immediately drop him. The only way he'd touch it is if he would re-do the whole drawing.
    Now the owner is trying to make nice to the architect. What a circus.
    Bottom line for me is we will not knowingly start a job that has HVAC code violations.
    jogas

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