Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    NH & Cebu
    Posts
    1,607
    Post Likes

    Walk-in insulation

    I'm comparing walk-in quotes. I need an oddball height for the box, so my usual Bally is out. So, I got a quote form Dade Manuf, US Cooler and Southeast Cooler.

    Southeast uses urethane, which I've always thought was the best.

    I was surprised to find US Cooler uses Extruded Polystyrene .....box is less money...and their website says it's better than urethane...hmmm

    I know Bally uses urethane...but they're out.

    I believe Dade uses urethane also.

    Urethane...or Extruded Polystyrene ?

    We're talking a very small box here - W/I freezer

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Monmouth Junction-NJ-USA
    Posts
    6,118
    Post Likes
    If it's a freezer has to be urethane with a floor. That is all I will use anyway.
    If you really know how it works, you have an execellent chance of fixin' er up!

    Tomorrow is promised to no one...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,369
    Post Likes
    h-doc, Give these folks a call http://www.harfordduracool.com/Home/Home.asp

    They do the weird stuff the small stuff.
    A division of Manitowoc Equipment Works.

    Specify 5" walls the floor can be 4" though.
    CES is slowly going to creep across the country.
    FEN

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    12,919
    Post Likes
    I have no experience with US Coolers, but I have a few Dade boxes that are experiencing some severe panel failure with skin separation.

    Go with Southest Coolers. They make a good box...and Bruce, the owner is a good friend of our own kfridge.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    111
    Post Likes
    Poured-foam urethane insulation provides a panel insulation rating (or "R" value) of 29 - more than double the insulating value of fiberglass, polystyrene or cellular glass block.
    And as The MoJo stated Harford Duracool's Walk-in is a Quality Box. It's parent company is Manitowoc, This is the box I use
    If your not part of the solution, You must be part of the problem

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,199
    Post Likes
    hvacmd,

    US Coolers claim is that extruded polystyrene will not break down with use in the field as much as polyurethane. I have not sold their product but I do have four quoted and I will use them if the jobs are sold. They have been competitive in their pricing and their comments on R-value does grab my interest.

    Here is a statement from their website.

    "When buying a walk-in cooler or freezer ask what the aged R-value of the insulation will be 5 years after manufacturer and how resistant to moisture the insulation is. You will be surprised how these numbers vary from their published R-values.

    R-values of different types of insulations are as follows:

    Polyurethane: 1st yr R32....................5 yrs R6
    Expanded Polystyrene: 1st yr R19........5 yrs R10
    Extruded Polystyrene: 1st yr R32.........5 yrs R15 "


    Here's the link to their website, check out the FAQ section.

    www.uscooler.com


    Regards..................Powell

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes

    EP or PU



    Any company can claim their insulation has the highest R-value and technically be telling the truth. Extruded polystyrene does appear to be better the colder you're keeping the freezer.

    But it does make sense that EP would hold up better than polyurethane. Poly-u looks like swiss cheese (pockets for water retention?), and comes out soaked upon turning it off and replacing it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    White Lake, MI
    Posts
    973
    Post Likes
    This is a subject I know a little about...

    Urethane has the name, reputation and big money behind it. Stated R-values are only given for virgin product. Testing is only done under ideal conditions. Urethane production is something of an art form, which is not good from the standpoint of a consistant finished part. The mix of chemicals can also be adjusted by the OEM, with an end-user being none the wiser. A rigid-railed part can hide a multitude of sins.

    Extruded foam block comes from either Owens Corning or Dow. The product is very stable and consistent. Fresh product R-value is just a hair away from fresh Urethane. I know cause I've done the testing.

    Extruded or expanded polystyrene is hydrophoic by nature. It repels water. You want your life preserver to be made with it. Not so Urethane.

    In a freezer wall, a dew point will occur at some point within the insulation. No problem with polystyrene, it doesn't absorb water. Big problem with Urethane, I don't care who's Urethane. The trucking industry knows this, when their urethane trailers gain thousands of pounds of weight over years of use.

    You won't see Bally, southeast, Harford, any of the Urethane guys advertising what a 2 year old panel R-value is after use. The Poly's will be the same though. Expanded will rival, extruded will exceed.

    Don't be afraid of the extruded product, it makes a fine panel. More companies then just US Cooler use it also (wink).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    12,038
    Post Likes
    awesome post. That was extremely useful to me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    12,726
    Post Likes
    Just wanted to hold on to this thread for future reference.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Near Atlanta, GA.
    Posts
    13,698
    Post Likes
    SE Cooler uses polystyrene too since the new regulations came out.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,369
    Post Likes
    Wow is this one old enough.....

    The finest insulation in a structure is not urethane open cell or polystyrene.

    The best insulation is used in the medical field.

    The process is called VIP or Vacuum Injected Process.

    The cabinets used are injected with very dense urethane in a vacuum condition which draws out 95% of the remaining open cell structure.

    No moisture can form in the extremely dense foam.

    A 2 1/2 " wall has about a R-42 factor.

    And yes its damn expensive.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    White Lake, MI
    Posts
    973
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by the mojo View Post
    Wow is this one old enough.....

    The finest insulation in a structure is not urethane open cell or polystyrene.

    The best insulation is used in the medical field.

    The process is called VIP or Vacuum Injected Process.

    The cabinets used are injected with very dense urethane in a vacuum condition which draws out 95% of the remaining open cell structure.

    No moisture can form in the extremely dense foam.

    A 2 1/2 " wall has about a R-42 factor.

    And yes its damn expensive.
    Everything I have researched shows a point of diminishing return in insulating properties with an increase of density. The insulating properties relied on the cell structure itself and what filled them, rather than the density, and there was an optimum point of return on investment.

    Knowing the Mojo personally I have to respect his input. It is something I need to look at.

    We have a long term vision of finding a product or process which leapfrogs current technology. Nothing I have seen shows in a cost investment vs long term return analysis that anything currently surpasses extruded polystyrene manufactured by Dow. Unfortunately I have yet to meet the customer where cost is not a factor in a buying decision.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.