Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    STL
    Posts
    111

    Wink Best way prep for a blower door test and...

    I'm considering having a blower door test done along with whatever energy heating and cooling loss tests that can or should be done.

    My question is, what is the BEST way for a homeowner to prep for any of these tests.
    I mean, besides cleaning the fireplace to prevent ashes from being sucked in,
    what else do you recommend a HO to do to make the technicians job as easy and efficient as possible, and for me to get the MOST beneficial information to use.

    I totally understand that a tech is there to do his job. Not change furnace filters, move furniture, or dodge the family pet.

    Here is one specific question. I have some unused rooms (guest bedrooms, and an unfinished basement) that I have the ductwork shut off to.
    Lately this can create as much as a 10 degree difference between the conditioned and unconditioned rooms. (It's not a problem, we arent useing them)

    Should all of the rooms be temp. conditioned before the test day, or should the house be left in the state of "regular use".

    I know you testers are out there. What can a homeowner do for you besides have a big plate of brownies and coffee for you?

    Thank you,
    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Quote Originally Posted by electrajim View Post
    Here is one specific question. I have some unused rooms (guest bedrooms, and an unfinished basement) that I have the ductwork shut off to.
    Lately this can create as much as a 10 degree difference between the conditioned and unconditioned rooms. (It's not a problem, we arent useing them)

    Thank you,
    Jim
    You really shouldn't be shutting your duct work off to rooms. The reason being the system is setup with all supplies open. You go shut let's just say 10% of them. You cut off approximately that much air.

    On a 3 ton system it might require 1200 CFM....you just removed 120 CFM or about 540 lbs of air an hour of standard air.



    I'm sure someone can chime in on the blower door prep....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    STL
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
    You really shouldn't be shutting your duct work off to rooms. The reason being the system is setup with all supplies open. You go shut let's just say 10% of them. You cut off approximately that much air.

    On a 3 ton system it might require 1200 CFM....you just removed 120 CFM or about 540 lbs of air an hour of standard air.
    I appreciate the advise.
    System is an XV80 if that makes a difference. (variable speed blower)
    Not to get off topic, but I assume you are saying, don't close any supply (or return) vents to rooms, even unused rooms, in both heating and cooling seasons.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,793
    Shutting off 1 supply usually doesn't do any harm.
    Shutting off more then 1 can.
    Never shut off any returns. Most houses don't have enough return to begin with.


    On a VS blower.
    Shutting off supplies and returns, can cause it to work harder, and use more electric.
    If the shutting off of theose supplies and returns, increases static too much, it will shorten the life of that expensive blower!
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    in
    Posts
    36
    OP. Have the area around the door clean. door will have to be opened to install frame. have all registers open and unblocked if he will test ductwork. have your area around attic access open so it can be accessed. dont burn anything in fireplace for 2 days. all windows need closed and accessable.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Upstate SC
    Posts
    188
    Just a HO, but I would think try to address any obvious air leaks first, so you can be spending your money and time on things you may not be aware of. Examples could include outlets, lighting fixtures, duct work leaks, windows, gap around the exterior doors, etc. You may have a pretty solid house and this is a moot point. In that case - just ignore

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,327
    Put some diet coke in the fridge.
    Goes well with brownies.

    Seriously there isn't much you can do other that allow the person conducting the test access to all supply & return grills.
    Cleaning the fireplace of ashes is a good thing, make sure that flue is also closed.
    I usually put wet newspapers over the ashes if the fireplace has been used.
    If you have a lot of air infiltration you may smell attic..or fireplace, odors will fade
    soon..usually within a few minutes of the fan being turned off.


    Let us know how your house tests.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    northern Indiana
    Posts
    114

    blower door

    Follow instructions, let the tech decide what he wants done.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    132
    What are the reasons you have for this test? Is the house newly constructed?If yes was it built to energystar specs

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    STL
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by Dog View Post
    What are the reasons you have for this test? Is the house newly constructed?If yes was it built to energystar specs
    I WISH! Built in 1969.The house is a 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, 2 story with unfinished basement, attached, unconditioned, unfinished garage. House was not a custom build. One fireplace, gas heat, water, central air, in midwest.

    The only thing energystar about it is my PC!
    Jim

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    This should help explain what problems are typical in a home.

    http://www.energystar.gov/ia/product...IDE_2COLOR.pdf

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    STL
    Posts
    111
    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
    This should help explain what problems are typical in a home.

    http://www.energystar.gov/ia/product...IDE_2COLOR.pdf
    Nice information. Thanks everyone.
    I think I need to work on that entry access to the attic, for starters.
    Something like an "attic tent" or an equivalent.
    Although they seem like they are acceptable to stop air infiltration, it's R value can't be that much...but anything is better than a drywall drop-in insert.

    Thanks,

    Jim

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Dallas & Longview, TX
    Posts
    629
    For the attic access you can weatherstrip the lip that the drywall drop-in rests on and also glue a bat of fiberglass to the top side of it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event