Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4

    Furnace Flame sensor failures

    Folks,

    I'm new to this site. I'm not an HVAC professional. I need help. Can anyone tell me where I can find good reliable information (technical, statistical, other) on furnace flame sensor failure rates and the reason(s) for failures. Would the furnace manufactureres be good sources, is there a furnace manufacturers association out there I can contact, has anyone ever run across good articles on the subject? I'm open to everything. Thanks to anyone/everyone for help!

    Bob3

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,064
    Not really any good sites for that type of info.

    Most flame sensor failures are because of containates in the combustion air.
    Or improper burner set up.

    How many failures have you had.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    22
    I started a similar thread a while back. Hopefully this will help you:
    http://www.hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=132682

    Here are direct links to some helpful information:
    http://www.appliancemagazine.com/ae/...ne=214&first=1

    http://www.bradfordwhite.com/service..._corrosion.asp

    http://www.gastechnology.org/webroot...Page\11596.xml



    NOTE: Links are now fixed since original posting.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    there are seval reason for senser failor.
    te biggest reason is combustion sir contaminants as has been said
    gas purity is also playing a role
    flame impingment
    grounding of the unit
    burner ajustment
    and a few others

    the flame senser should be cleaned every year
    this is one reason the have your unit serviced

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,944
    Agreed;

    Combustion air contaminants such as anything that has chemically enhanced scents and/or the ammonia from cat boxes.

    Improper burning of fuel mix, especially for LP (propane) systems.

    Even oversized furnaces can contribute by having more cycles.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Most flame sensor failures are misdiagnosed when it comes to "changing the parts". A poor unit or board ground will cause them to lose flame signal on occasion, but the flame sensor itself, for a lack of a better description, is a metal rod with a ceramic mount. Odds are the sensors are not bad. Yes, the chemicals can cause them to corrode but gently polishing them is enough to bring them back. Unless the metal or ceramic is broken or burnt off, replacing it is an excersize in futilty.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    122
    [QUOTE=docholiday;1804795]Most flame sensor failures are misdiagnosed when it comes to "changing the parts". A poor unit or board ground will cause them to lose flame signal on occasion, but the flame sensor itself, for a lack of a better description, is a metal rod with a ceramic mount. Odds are the sensors are not bad. Yes, the chemicals can cause them to corrode but gently polishing them is enough to bring them back. Unless the metal or ceramic is broken or burnt off, replacing it is an excersize in futilty.[/QUOT


    I have only had to replace 2 flame sensors in 15 yrs, one the ceramic was broken grounding out, the other I broke the cermaic...contaminates can be cleaned with sandpaper... what I'm finding lately on some inexspensive units is that the ignitors are sparking to the wrong point, instead of sparking to the pilot assmebly they ground to the burner, sometimes lighting, sometimes not..( PACKAGE UNITS)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    122
    bob3 what is the unit doing?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4
    Snookered,

    Very helpful links. Thank you for taking the time to respond.

    bob

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4
    All,

    Thanks for providing this insight. It has helped me to direct my research on the topic.

    Bob

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4
    Bell,

    It's not my unit per se. I'm generally trying to understand the issues related to flame sensor failure to varying types of gas (or potentially air) quality on the functioning of a home furnaces' flame sensor. I'm trying to undertand if flame sensors are really sensitive to small impurities that exist over a very short time or if it's a realtively "insensitive" piece of equipment that is able to withstand a fair amount of "contamination" over time.

    Bob

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Grundy Co. IL
    Posts
    773

    Flame Sensors

    I don't know about the rest of you, but we come across flame sensors that are running on propane that end up being burned in half in a couple of years. But don't mention impurities in the gas, to the gas suppliers, they get very defensive. Anyone else see this?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    Then they werent set up right in the first place.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event