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  1. #1

    High Efficiency Furnace - Direct Vent - Through Wall

    Philadelphia customer requires installation of high efficiency furnace on the 2nd floor of a 3 story house. The location, near an exterior wall, suggests venting the unit through the wall into the alley. The location and configuration of the vent can meet all clearance requirements in the manufacturer's installation instructions, but the vent outlet, 12" from the wall, would be only about six feet from the attached house's side wall. Would this be permitted?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    You must remember that there is condensation and potentially a chance of dripping water onto the alley. If thats a walkway, you may cause ice to build. You might want to get the inspector to tell you if he will approve it or not before you commit. Some of that is subjective. If you can go up through the roof any way, you would be better off.

  3. #3
    While it is technically an alley, it is a dead end and the spot directly below the likely wall penetration for the vent is the roof (rubber) of an addition that goes to the property line: no walk way issues.
    Going up through the roof presents a problem because there is a bathroom directly above the utility space. I guess that the vent & intake could be run through to the roof, but it would be a LOT more work.
    My concern with venting to the alley area is that the products of combustion gases would be aimed at the neighbor's wall 6 feet away.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    ooh my god im lost, Pennsylvania
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    don't what type of equipment you are installing, but alot of manufactures want a tee on their termination. that would keep the flu gasses from jetting across the alley.

  5. #5
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    Inspectors are too flaky, I'd ask if they'll pass it thru the wall first. As long as the vent is not aimed directly at a window, even so, 6' is probably ok. But I agree, the roof would be alot better. More work = more $, right? Might be a pain, but that's nothing new, huh?...
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    N.E. Ok.
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    The T would solve your concerns about the neighbors wall, if your equip. allows. And you have no window or openings within the allowable distance on the other bldg.
    Their is a section addressing creating a public nuisance with venting. Doesn't sound like your situation will cause one,
    The most effective way is to call the local inspector and run it by, that away no surprise local code pops up.

  7. #7
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    Apr 2004
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    Whos stuff wants a T?

  8. #8
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    Jan 2004
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    Lancaster PA
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    As some others said.
    Call teh inspector and find out if it will pass or not.
    Better to call then to guess, and get failed.
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  9. #9
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    Mar 2008
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    I don't know about where you guys are from but here you have as long as your 7' above any walkway you're ok, and I thinks thats even according to the 2000 edition of the Mechanical Code.

  10. #10
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    Mar 2005
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    burlington county n.j.
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    don't know what that condensate dripping on a rubber roof will do over time??

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    N.E. Ok.
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    Quote Originally Posted by docholiday View Post
    Whos stuff wants a T?
    Goodman, Gmv9 direct vent allows t's sidewall and vertical. As shown in their illustration.
    Havn't ck. if others do.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    7,321
    it sounds like a conversion in center city philly and this is usually no problem. If you pitch the exhaust line the correct way you will not see a whole lot of condensate in the alley. Use a Candy cane termination just outside the wall and most of your condensate will pitch back toward the drain. You must use the birdscreen on the inlet due to the extremely short runs.

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