Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    albany, new york
    Posts
    20

    What to do with flooded water heaters

    It rained in Albany, New York over the past couple of weeks. Alot of homes were flooded causing heavy damage. I was called in to inspect the heating units. Most of the time, the heating units are raized off the ground enough not to get flooded but, others are sitting on the floor. My question is, what to do with flooded water heaters? The older models were an easy fix. The newer ones have a sealed chamber. Is there an easy fix besides replacement?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    Same principle applies; if the operating controls are under water, replace them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    albany, new york
    Posts
    20
    what if the water does not get to the gas valve?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    N.E. Ok.
    Posts
    1,376
    Quote Originally Posted by dashawn42000 View Post
    what if the water does not get to the gas valve?
    110% sure?
    Will you sign off on it?
    What got wet the legs, or is it flat bottomed.
    Structurally may rust and weaken.
    How old, Maybe wise for Ho to replace even if not water damaged.
    Most important is it in safe operating condition. Only the qualified tech. checking the tank can make these calls.

    Edit: answer to original ? Haul off to scrapyard and replace.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    albany, new york
    Posts
    20
    I'm the first one to say replace. I'm just trying to be sure that there isn't something I missed, like some old guy showing up on the job site making me look bad. By the way, these are home depot flat bottom water heaters.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    1,213
    You are there, you must make the call Ain't it great??

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,793
    Unless your 100% sure, and can prove the controls weren't under water, the controls/valves MUST be replaced.

    There will always be someone that will go in a home and say you don't have to.
    Thats their risk when it kills someone.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,517
    furnace or water heater under water replace it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,125
    Replace replace replace. We had heavy flooding here last year, and we replaced a ton of water heaters. If you have any doubt, replace.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    N.E. Ok.
    Posts
    1,376
    Quote Originally Posted by dashawn42000 View Post
    I'm the first one to say replace. I'm just trying to be sure that there isn't something I missed, like some old guy showing up on the job site making me look bad. By the way, these are home depot flat bottom water heaters.
    When you make a call explain your position and allways put safety first.
    Don't worry about someone else's opinion you will sleep good

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Ga
    Posts
    28
    If it was my water heater, I'd dry it out and replace the thermostats if electric. A lot of the electrics these days are foam lined and the water is not going to get between the foam and the heater anyway. The foam is encased in a plastic too so the tank shell probably isn't going to rust much faster then it normally would ,if you dry it out. If it was a fiberglass insulated tank it will take a long time to dry out and will probably rust the shell out over time. If it was gas and didn't get into the gas valve, I'd dry it out and run it and check its operation. Most gas water heater are required to be put on a pedestal these days. Sealed chambers are not sealed against water infiltration. If you're doing it for a customer, I'd let them make the call, and if they want to keep it get them to sign off on it so you aren't liable in any way. David

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    22
    Manufactures recommend replacing the entire water heater of any submerged unit that has a "flame guard" style bottom. IE State & AO Smith.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event