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  1. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by srmfsr View Post
    Not likely. But on the other hand I have seen a drain completely flood a plenum for weeks and the the problem corrected and no smell after it dried out. That is why I am second thinking this thing. Are you sure you're not drawing air from under the house when the unit comes on? Is the trunk line connected solid and air tight?
    From a visual check, the seals seem tight. However, I probably need to have a pro look at it. I'm probably going to just replace the drain line this weekend and clean the pan too.

    The frustrating part is that the "pros" I've used probably didn't do a thorough job of checking the intake and trunk lines. They're too busy trying to sell me more equipment I don't need. No one is really interested in actually doing a top to bottom check of the lines, etc.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,064
    Quote Originally Posted by srmfsr View Post
    Not likely. But on the other hand I have seen a drain completely flood a plenum for weeks and the the problem corrected and no smell after it dried out. That is why I am second thinking this thing. Are you sure you're not drawing air from under the house when the unit comes on? Is the trunk line connected solid and air tight?
    You need to take the ducts/air handler apart until you find the wet spot. After cleaning and reasymbling, keep the equipment dry as possible. This may include operating the fan enough to dry down the coil/condensate pan and ducts between cooling cycles. The crawlspace must also be dry. Closing vents that allow outside humid air to enter is a must. Of course the soil must be covered with plastice. Also enough dehumidification is required to maintain <50% throughout the crawlspace and the home. Doing all of this will assure not having any biological growth or odors. Note easy but effective. Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  3. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by teddy bear View Post
    You need to take the ducts/air handler apart until you find the wet spot. After cleaning and reasymbling, keep the equipment dry as possible. This may include operating the fan enough to dry down the coil/condensate pan and ducts between cooling cycles. The crawlspace must also be dry. Closing vents that allow outside humid air to enter is a must. Of course the soil must be covered with plastice. Also enough dehumidification is required to maintain <50% throughout the crawlspace and the home. Doing all of this will assure not having any biological growth or odors. Note easy but effective. Regards TB
    Agreed about everything here. We've already closed off 2/3s of the vents (sealed) with a few open for some cross ventilation. To help with dehumidification, we've installed a special crawl space dehumidifier to remove excess moisture. It's cranked up to keep the RH around 40%. The ground was allowed to dry out completely after our water issues early in 2007 and a new vapor barrier was installed. We also have a perimeter system installed in the crawl space to limit/stop water intrusion. I think that whatever problems we have now are stemming from inside the system. One thing that may help a little, I just ordered a new door for our Aprilaire 2200. The tabs had been broken and, although it was duct taped closed, occasionally it pulled open a little bit. Also, I agree that we need to have the whole unit check. I really want to focus on the drain line and make sure the pan is angled correctly.

    Here's a new piece of info. I had our drain line run from the back side of the house into an under ground piping system that channels H20 from our yard to the back of our property. That pipe is large and will not clog so I know that's not contributing to our problem. What is interesting is that I decided to pull the drain line from the CS handler to that pipe open to see how much condensate was in it. And there was zero. It was bone dry. It's been fairly mild here so the system doesn't run all the time. But even when I let it run with the heat on and the the air for a while and back and forth, nothing dripped out. Shouldn't I expect to see some condensate? I'm assuming that if I am, it's probably all draining and collecting into my system somewhere.

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