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  1. #1

    High effeciency boiler w/o radiant?

    Thanks for everyone's responses to my last post.
    I am getting an estimate on replacing my New Yorker boiler. I'm interested in using a system other than oil. My New Yorker that is power vented (no chimney) is noisy and smells of exhaust. It may be because the power vent comes on right when the furnace fires up and not before as I think it is supposed to.

    Anyway, the estimate will be for a Buderus high efficiency condensing boiler. My question is will this be cost effective in the long run if I only have forced hot water baseboard (finned copper)? I've heard that the higher temps reduces condensing, therefore lowers efficiency? How much would this lower my efficiency and would it still be a good decision?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,837
    Since you've got copper finned baseboard convection heaters, you certainly won't realize the savings of a low temperature application. Few houses in the USA can realize those savings. However, operating with an outdoor temperature reset control can lower the water temperature as low as about 145F. That is some savings. But I'd suggest you consider a low mass boiler like the System 2000. With the low mass, you won't need to heat up the big, heavy cast iron boiler block and won't lose the heat as much during stand-by. In fact, if you need a power vent, it is possible to run the System 2000 as a direct vent unit, though we prefer to install the System 2000 power vent as you get better combustion performance. Their power vents are sized for the boiler and are relatively quiet compared to the universal field installed units. The System 2000 goes from room temperature, cold start up toe 145F in only 90-seconds. To prevent condensation in the boiler, there is a zone valve that remains closed until the water temp is up to 145, then it opens allowing water circulation. Some untrained personnel don't like the System 2000 because you have to know how to work with the Energy Manager. But it's no big deal for a competent service tech. I've got one in my own home and it's saved me a whole bunch of money over the last couple of years. My service manager also has one and loves it. They're so quiet operating you can barely hear them if you get the model with the air box on it. Personally, I think they're just the ticket for copper finned baseboard applications. For radiant applications I'd go with either the Buderus of Viessmann condensing boilers. There you can take advantage of the boiler and water mass that's advantageous to the radiant temperatures. Each product has its place in the industry, IMO.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    18951
    Posts
    1,593
    Quote Originally Posted by yogi View Post
    Thanks for everyone's responses to my last post.
    I am getting an estimate on replacing my New Yorker boiler. I'm interested in using a system other than oil. My New Yorker that is power vented (no chimney) is noisy and smells of exhaust. It may be because the power vent comes on right when the furnace fires up and not before as I think it is supposed to.

    Anyway, the estimate will be for a Buderus high efficiency condensing boiler. My question is will this be cost effective in the long run if I only have forced hot water baseboard (finned copper)? I've heard that the higher temps reduces condensing, therefore lowers efficiency? How much would this lower my efficiency and would it still be a good decision?

    thanks
    I seriously doubt how a new boiler could be cost effective unless oil goes sky high and you keep the new boiler a long long time. A horizontal tube New Yorker is one of the best boilers around. They are easy to work on, easy to clean and about 83% to 86% efficient. A vertical tube New Yorker (with the smoke pipe off the top) is a different story.

    The power venter should definitely come on before the boiler fires. Your whole problem is the power venter. Get some kind of conventional flue.

    You sound like you're hell bent on getting a new boiler, and that's your decision, but remember the boiler is one piece of equipment, and the power venter is another.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,048
    Your power venter is not hooked up right.

    As far as a high efficiency mod/con gas boiler.
    You will see a savings. How much, can't be pridicted over the internet.
    A mod/con, even if it the water temp is above condensing temp, will reduce its firing rate to what the house needs. The Buderus comes with OD reset.

    Before you switch to gas. Check you rates.
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