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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    los angeles
    Posts
    32
    What kind of ducting are you talking about? For flex duct R6 we use duct tape and zipp ties and for metal duct we use foil tape.

    Don't ask what you would do, ask what I would do.

  2. #28
    if you have metal duct which I believe you do you need to be sure all seams are sealed with tape and any horizontal seams need to be at the top.all insulation should be stapled and taped with foil tape.when we install everything thats got tape gets mastic it may be messy but if applied correctly its the best sealer.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    196
    What kind of stapler is typically used for 2" insulation?

  4. #30
    go to most any supply house and tell them what you need i believe the model i use is a g66 cost about 60 bucks

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by mlo1 View Post
    What kind of stapler is typically used for 2" insulation?
    they are outward clinch staplers. cost $30-40

    http://www.amazon.com/T50OC-OUTWARD-.../dp/B000WSWOHM

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    45
    I requested info and a quote on Aeroseal. The tech was very forthright and advised that it could not seal larger leaks within the walls (usually punctured during construction). Another drawback was that the cost of Aeroseal would take years for me to recover.


    Quote Originally Posted by dash View Post
    Interesting that you asked,I was just going to post it.

    Excellent process tried and proven.We have been doing it for over 5 years.

    It is time consuming to seal ductboard ,so a little pricey,but definately works and you have true before and after seal leakage cfms.

    Plus it seals from the inside out,so we can seal ducts in spaces that no one can even get to.With hand seaing leaks are often or always under the insulation,at the metal or flex liner,hard toget to,Aeroseal seals there with no problem.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Quote Originally Posted by jaeme911 View Post
    I requested info and a quote on Aeroseal. The tech was very forthright and advised that it could not seal larger leaks within the walls (usually punctured during construction). Another drawback was that the cost of Aeroseal would take years for me to recover.
    He's local and should know,but it's hard to imagine leaks from construction being over 5/8ths of an inch.


    Hard to calculate the savings until you know what the leakage is ,and where it is coming from(return) or going(supply).

    We find over 250 cfms leakage is not uncommon,and usually reduce it to <25 cfms.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    91
    another question on sealing.....

    what's the best way to seal can lights?

    Can I place some insulation over the top? I noticed when I was in the atic and the lights were on I could see every light. I'm sure this is a place for heat loss.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    There are "kits" for some brands,National Comfort Insitute has them,I think.

    Years ago we built duct board boxes over them,with mastic to the drywall.

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,571
    Quote Originally Posted by printmanjackson View Post
    another question on sealing.....

    what's the best way to seal can lights?

    Can I place some insulation over the top? I noticed when I was in the atic and the lights were on I could see every light. I'm sure this is a place for heat loss.
    Turn them off when you leave the room. During cooling season you want all the heat generated by the lights to dissipate outside the conditioned space. Also, insulation over them will cause them to overheat. Airtight enclosures can be found to prevent air infiltration through the fixture, but they aren't designed to trap the heat.
    Last edited by hvacrmedic; 03-01-2008 at 10:14 AM.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    45

    Wink

    The tech was indicating that he has had situations where he could not lower the leakage to his particular satisfaction and attributed it to punctured ducts.

    I'm not sure if I was quoted an unusually high price but I could heat & cool my house for a full year for the price quoted.


    Quote Originally Posted by dash View Post
    He's local and should know,but it's hard to imagine leaks from construction being over 5/8ths of an inch.


    Hard to calculate the savings until you know what the leakage is ,and where it is coming from(return) or going(supply).

    We find over 250 cfms leakage is not uncommon,and usually reduce it to <25 cfms.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by jaeme911 View Post
    I'm not sure if I was quoted an unusually high price but I could heat & cool my house for a full year for the price quoted.
    When I replaced my system a few years ago, the dealer also did Areoseal. The price quoted was so high it was almost a full year's heating too. I just noticed that they are nolonger listing AreoSeal on thier website and AreoSeal's website does not list them anylonger either. I guess with prices like that they didn't do many jobs.

    It's a shame it costs so much. I sure would like to have it done. I think it could help balance out my upstares/downstaire temp differences.

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    91
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    Turn them off when you leave the room. During cooling season you want all the heat generated by the lights to dissipate outside the conditioned space. Also, insulation over them will cause them to overheat. Airtight enclosures can be found to prevent air infiltration through the fixture, but they aren't designed to trap the heat.
    I looked at the sticker that is in the inside of my can lights and it states:

    For Direct Contact With Thermal Insulation

    this is a Capri/Thomas brand recessed light

    So I take it that I can seal this with some bat insulation?

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