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Thread: Heat pump reset

  1. #1

    Heat pump reset

    Have had to reset Rheam heat pump almost daily. Coils are clean inside and out. Tech came and said pressure is a little high (low side 50, high side 175 at 30 F outside and 65 F inside).

    Tech replaced contactor switch, defrost board, still same problem. Now tech says need to replace drier for possible restriction. Takes too long to equalize (3-4 minutes) after shutdown.

    This is getting expensive. Tech knows AC but apparently not so much heat pump.

    System sounds noisy to me - hissing sound much louder than in air conditioning mode.

    Any suggestions of good questions to ask tech - I'd call someone else but don't have any leads on someone who knows their stuff.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    NW AR
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    First, Id find another tech. You shouldnt have to pay him to learn his job.
    A restriced drier is easy to diagnose without removal.
    Ask if its charged correctly and how it was checked.
    Depending on the metering device it could take that long to equalize.
    None of the parts that he replaced would make me think high pressure.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Florida
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    Pressure's high? Don't think so by your numbers. Check your yellow pages for a heatpump specialist.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    south carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckweasel View Post
    Have had to reset Rheam heat pump almost daily. Coils are clean inside and out. Tech came and said pressure is a little high (low side 50, high side 175 at 30 F outside and 65 F inside).

    Tech replaced contactor switch, defrost board, still same problem. Now tech says need to replace drier for possible restriction. Takes too long to equalize (3-4 minutes) after shutdown.

    This is getting expensive. Tech knows AC but apparently not so much heat pump.

    System sounds noisy to me - hissing sound much louder than in air conditioning mode.

    Any suggestions of good questions to ask tech - I'd call someone else but don't have any leads on someone who knows their stuff.

    Thanks.
    That high preassure reset will trip somewhere around 300-350 not 175. I'm not sure why you've had to replace the defrost board or the contactor. It takes about three minutes to equalize pressures I think if your guy doesnt know heatpumps then you need to get a new guy it sounds like your just changing parts hoping to fix it

  5. #5
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    Jun 2003
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    Possibly staying in defrost too long, have them check that

  6. #6
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    Aug 2002
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    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
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    Lack of indoor air flow is the likely problem.

    If it's a "short" (around three feet tall/long) Rheem Air handler,the supply duct leaving the air handler should be very narrow,compared to the cabinet width.Can you post the model number and/or a picture??

  7. #7

    reset

    I dont know about these part changers sounds like you have a bad fan motor mabey slowing down on longer runs. you check your heatpump output by temp instead of pressure ( works much better )

  8. #8

    Heat pump reset

    Reply to Dash: This unit has been operating for 11 years - I don't think it is a ductwork problem.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckweasel View Post
    Reply to Dash: This unit has been operating for 11 years - I don't think it is a ductwork problem.
    Probably a weak pressure switch. Very common.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckweasel View Post
    Reply to Dash: This unit has been operating for 11 years - I don't think it is a ductwork problem.
    Did you have some one out for an A/C problem this summer. If so, did he add charge to it.

    It could be an air flow problem. Your indoor coil could be dirty.
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    The reset switch is either doing its job or it's bad. The switch can be checked fairly easily. If it checks ok, then it's just doing its job. There are several reasons why head pressure can run high when you're not watching. A couple of those were mentioned already. In any case, sounds like you need a more experienced tech to look at it. This shouldn't be a difficult problem to diagnose. One more thing to add to the list of possibilities is an overcharge.

  12. #12
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    May 2006
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    That pressure switch should not trip below 300 psi. If it is then it is bad. heat mode, cool mode doesn't matter. I have replaced quite a few of these switches on rheem/ruud units.
    I'd find a different tech.

  13. #13
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    Jul 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by gsxrsquid View Post
    That pressure switch should not trip below 300 psi. If it is then it is bad. heat mode, cool mode doesn't matter. I have replaced quite a few of these switches on rheem/ruud units.
    I'd find a different tech.
    There's no reason to assume without more info that the pressure switch is bad. More often than not the switch is just doing its job, but the tech jumps to the conclusion that it's bad because he isn't reading high head on his gauge. I've seen several changed out, but in my personal experience I've found that the switch is almost always just doing its job. Very few of them have I found that were actually bad. It's easy to check them, just put it in cool mode and pull the fan lead off the relay. See what pressure it actually trips at. The odds are much more likely that it's a stuck defrost sensor, an overcharge, or a fan or blower shutting down, than a bad switch. That doesn't mean that they don't go bad though, but it wouldn't be the first thing that I suspected.

    If the switch wasn't actually tested, but replacing it seemed to cure the problem, then the tech may assume that he called it right, but that wasn't necessarily the REAL problem. If it was an overcharge causing it, then he might have cured it by weighing back in the correct charge after replacing the switch. And sometimes the reason they didn't call back about the problem is that they called somebody else instead. Just something to think about. If it wasn't tested, then my assumption is going to be that it wasn't the real problem rather than vice versa.

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