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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    18951
    Posts
    1,593
    Good survey. A couple of loaded questions, but overall a good survey. I like the Q&A "How would you try to find a professional heating and cooling contractor to service the system in your home? Look for a sticker on my system for a name/number 29%." I guess the "other - 16%" includes an internet search.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    71

    Thumbs up Enjoyed your Info

    Honeywell Guy,

    Enjoyed your comments and link. Thank you.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Quote Originally Posted by bobb25 View Post
    Good survey. A couple of loaded questions, but overall a good survey. I like the Q&A "How would you try to find a professional heating and cooling contractor to service the system in your home? Look for a sticker on my system for a name/number 29%." I guess the "other - 16%" includes an internet search.
    Works great,we put stickers on the units ,and a clear one with light colored lettering on the stat,Before they leave the shop!!

  4. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Western Kansas
    Posts
    267
    Glad to hear you made the switch ok and was cautious in the electrics. Another thing to consider when converting EAC to media, is the gap between the door and the filter....most, I have to glue a foam strip on to properly seal.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    40
    In my case there was no gap - the new filter was a perfect fit!

    -cinergi

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Nashville area
    Posts
    15
    Pretty common thing to do of EAC breaks and someone does not want to spend money to repair.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by Honeywell Guy View Post
    Q: When it comes to maintaining an air filter for your home,
    which would you prefer?

    Homeowner Preference Percent
    Disposable (toss) 47%
    Renewable (wash) 53%
    Have them remove the pre filters and cells from an EAC, clean them, and reinstall them, then tell them that has to be done every 1 to 3 months.

    See how the numbers change.

    A very small minority of EACs I have seen in the field are actually maintained properly by the homeowner, if at all.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Have them remove the pre filters and cells from an EAC, clean them, and reinstall them, then tell them that has to be done every 1 to 3 months.

    See how the numbers change.

    A very small minority of EACs I have seen in the field are actually maintained properly by the homeowner, if at all.
    You are right ,of course,but the idea of clean it yourself,appeals ,over having to spend a few dollars.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Philadelphia Pa.
    Posts
    461
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Have them remove the pre filters and cells from an EAC, clean them, and reinstall them, then tell them that has to be done every 1 to 3 months.

    See how the numbers change.

    A very small minority of EACs I have seen in the field are actually maintained properly by the homeowner, if at all.

    I've had my EAC since 2002, clean it every 28 to 30 days and keep the cleaning log in the manual up to date. Maybe this is too often. It doesn't take long and really is not that hard so I don't understand why this is a big deal. I see it as just part of the maintenance that is performed in my home--you know-- I bought it--I take care of it.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,986
    Quote Originally Posted by cinergi View Post
    Thanks for all your replies! I performed the swap last night. I turned off the circuit breaker to the EAC, removed the pre-filters, main cells and charcoal post-filters, and installed a Honeywell 20x25x4.5 media filter, which fit perfectly in the housing!

    I also called my tech over to check the air flow; there was no significant difference from the values he recorded with the EAC in place last week, and I can't feel any difference in the air flow from the registers either.

    So overall, it looks like the swap was successful! I did notice a problem this morning, however. Remember that as part of the swap, I removed the charcoal post-filters because I've never needed any in my previous home, and have never had any odour issues - just a good media filter was always enough. After a night of running the fan without the charcoal filters, however, there was an unpleasant stuffy/musty type of smell throughout the house. Apparently, the charcoal filters had been absorbing this smell before.

    So now my problem is, where is this smell coming from? I poked my nose inside the filter housing, vents, etc., but I couldn't find the source, and the air coming directly from the registers doesn't seem to have this smell; it just kind of permeates the whole house. Of course, I could put back the charcoal post-filters, but this is just treating the symptom and not the cause, and it would increase airflow resistance as well. Any ideas? (I realize it's hard to diagnose smells over the Internet ).

    Thanks,
    cinergi
    You didn't mention where the unit is located IE: basement or attic. Changing the filter's restriction could have caused air pressure inbalances that weren't present with the EAC but still allow for proper air flows. OR the charcoal filter with the EAC had been installed by the previous owner to remedy the very odor problem that you're now experiencing.
    It's possible your home has a hidden mold problem that was either never identified or was, but not completely taken care of and the EAC components were installed as part of that "cure".

    Just my thoughts.........
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    40
    Thanks firecontrol. The HVAC system is in the basement. It had already occurred to me that the charcoal filters may have been installed to mask an existing odour / mold problem. However, I looked all over the place and couldn't find any mold; furthermore, the house is not a leaky / humid house (RH is 40%), and the basement in particular is bone dry.

    I even put the charcoal filters back in for a few days (together with the new media filter), but the smell still didn't go away. After doing this, I remembered that on the same day that I originally removed them, I had some new leather sofas delivered. My current theory is that the smell is coming from the new sofas (the leather smell + chemical out-gassing from the upholstery). The smell only seems to be present in the room with the sofas. I say "seems to be", because the house is open-concept so the smell can travel easily.

    To test this theory, I closed a bedroom door for a few days. When I re-opened it, there was no trace of smell in the room. If the smell were coming through the HVAC system, I assume it would have come into that room through the register.

    So now I'm just waiting for a few weeks, and hopefully the smell will go away by itself as the sofas age a bit... If not, I'll have to keep looking...

    The only other changes that were made to the HVAC system since I bought the house are:

    - I replaced the humidifer water panel with a new one.

    - I had an HVAC contractor move the humidifier's water supply from the cold water to hot water. One theory I have (I don't know if it's even possible) is that since the hot water wasn't used for about 2 months since the house sat empty (although the water heater was on the whole time), some mold could have grown inside the water heater tank, and when the humidifer's water supply was moved, the mold came out of the tank and into the humidifer, and from there into the rest of the house. I'll have to pull the water panel to check for mold on it. Is it even possible for mold to grow inside an operating water heater that's full of water? The hot water doesn't smell or taste funny, by the way - it looks clean.

    Thanks,
    -cinergi

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    69

    Smile

    If it was in your hot water tank, I do believe you would have the same smell when you wash the dishes, do the laundry and take a shower. I would look into the horizontal run for the return and see what the inside looks like.

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,986
    Just another possibility for you to think about..... I hooked up a humdifier to the hot side of a hot water heater once in a commercial job. The town had a lot of minerals and "stuff" in their water supply. Took the people in the building about a week after it started being used to plead with me to come switch it back to the cold water side. They said the air coming off of it was gross smelling (thier words).

    I put it originally on the hot side to increase the output capacity. The cold side worked pretty good... they said if they needed more they'd buy a couple portable ones.
    Use the biggest hammer you like, pounding a square peg into a round hole does not equal a proper fit.

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