Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1

    old York heat pump SEER?

    Hello All,

    First post here. Looks like some interesting reading.

    How would I find out what the SEER rating in my old heat pump is?

    I have a 2.5 ton York heat pump. Approx 14 years old. Model # B3PS030A06A, serial # NKAM151183 It's been falling apart during the past year. The compressor still works great, but everything else is failing due to age. Leaks, Accumulator rusted through, control board, etc.

    I'm having it replaced with a larger 3 ton Rheem RQPL series 14 SEER with 410A refrigerant.

    I would like to know the SEER rating of the old unit and how much (ballpark) can I expect to save with the new one? 10%, 40% How much?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    When I replaced my 21 year-old 7 SEER Trane heat pump with a new 14 SEER, 12 EER Goodman, I saw a 40% reduction in kilowatt consumption comparing Aug '07 with August '06. These months were similar in average temperature for my area. To do a more accurate analysis would require the #of cooling degree days.

    I would ballpark 30% savings for your upgrade from a 14 year old unit. A little more if that old unit was low on refrigerant.

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    930
    Someone else might be able to give you an exact SEER rating for your old equipment.
    But I would like to point out that the SEER rating was given for NEW equipment. You said yourself that yours is falling apart and has leaks. The actual SEER is probably half the original SEER, based on your comments. But it's only a guess at this point. The only way to get an accurate number at this point would be to have your old system SEER tested. You can bet the new system will run cheaper than the old one you describe.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,829
    Quote Originally Posted by gary_g View Post
    When I replaced my 21 year-old 7 SEER Trane heat pump with a new 14 SEER, 12 EER Goodman, I saw a 40% reduction in kilowatt consumption comparing Aug '07 with August '06. These months were similar in average temperature for my area. To do a more accurate analysis would require the #of cooling degree days.
    This really isn't true. If you take the actual SEER of the system (not the manufacturers NAME of the system and subtract the old SEER number, divide that by the new SEER number, you should get the per cent of savings. For example, if your new system is truly 14-SEER, coming from a 7-SEER, you should see a 50% savings. Since you only saw 40%, it's safe to assume that either your old Trane unit was delivering more than 7-SEER or more likely, the new system is only doing about 12-SEER. You see, the SEER rating is actuallly the number of BTU's of work you'll get for each 1-watt of electricity used. So if you actually got 14 Btu's per watt with the new system and 7 Btu's per watt from the old, then clearly the new system would twice as efficient or use 1/2 the electricity for a 50% savings. Since you only saw a 40% savings, a 40% improvement over 7-SEER would be 12-SEER. See?
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,903
    SEER is not necessarily an accurate indicator of efficiency; it's a lab test figure used to compare equipment.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,704
    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    SEER is not necessarily an accurate indicator of efficiency; it's a lab test figure used to compare equipment.
    Considering that all efficiency (SEER, EER, COP, HSPF ) ratings are lab test.
    No one gets the rating.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    This really isn't true. If you take the actual SEER of the system (not the manufacturers NAME of the system and subtract the old SEER number, divide that by the new SEER number, you should get the per cent of savings. For example, if your new system is truly 14-SEER, coming from a 7-SEER, you should see a 50% savings. Since you only saw 40%, it's safe to assume that either your old Trane unit was delivering more than 7-SEER or more likely, the new system is only doing about 12-SEER. You see, the SEER rating is actuallly the number of BTU's of work you'll get for each 1-watt of electricity used. So if you actually got 14 Btu's per watt with the new system and 7 Btu's per watt from the old, then clearly the new system would twice as efficient or use 1/2 the electricity for a 50% savings. Since you only saw a 40% savings, a 40% improvement over 7-SEER would be 12-SEER. See?
    Hello.

    That is very incorrect.

    True cooling costs are determined by EER and not SEER. SEER is not "actuallly the number of BTU's of work you'll get for each 1-watt of electricity used". That is the definition of the Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) = system cooling btus / divided by the condenser power draw in watts (at 95F laboratory conditions). A 36,000 btu system that draws 3000 watts is 12 EER.

    For a fixed speed fan in the air handler:
    SEER = EER (at 82F) x fudge factor. The fudge factor is the Cyclic Degradation Coefficient.

    For a variable speed fan in the air handler, the SEER calc is much more complicated and involves calculating the EER at 10 bin temperatures ranging from 67F to 102F in 5 degree increments. The lowest 3 temps make up 66% of the value of the calc while the highest 3 temps account for only 7% of the calc.

    SEER is a bullsh%t number geared towards lower operating temps. Just because a system is high SEER, doesn't mean it is cheaper to run. Some 16 SEER systems do not achieve a 12 EER. A high EER system is always cheaper to operate than a lower EER system.

    Info from ARI Standard 210/240, Performance Rating of Unitary Air Conditioning and Air Source Heat Pump Equipment.
    Page 82 for fixed speed air handler.
    Pages 82 - 86 for variable speed air handler.

    Take care.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_C View Post
    Hello All,

    First post here. Looks like some interesting reading.

    How would I find out what the SEER rating in my old heat pump is?

    I have a 2.5 ton York heat pump. Approx 14 years old. Model # B3PS030A06A, serial # NKAM151183 It's been falling apart during the past year. The compressor still works great, but everything else is failing due to age. Leaks, Accumulator rusted through, control board, etc.

    I'm having it replaced with a larger 3 ton Rheem RQPL series 14 SEER with 410A refrigerant.

    I would like to know the SEER rating of the old unit and how much (ballpark) can I expect to save with the new one? 10%, 40% How much?

    1993---- 28,200 btu--------10 seer

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image