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  1. #1

    high velocity systems good?

    I'm going to be building a new summer home on the shore in New England and was thinking of going with a high velocity heating/cooling system. Is there a lot of experience out there with them to say whether they are as good as they sound? I would be concerned about being orphaned if the technology doesn't work well and the system isn't reliable. The extra dehumidification sounds like a plus for a humid environment. How well do they work for heat and what is a typical setup for that purpose? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    18951
    Posts
    1,593
    They can work ok, but are mainly for retrofit work. They must be installed properly, or you can have noise problems, and are more expensive. If you're building new, install a conventional system.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,079
    If starting from scratch I'd never go HV. They are pricey, kill SEER and lower capacity. A good variable speed air handler with the right control will do just as well at dehumidification and the variable speed blower will boost SEER. I'd only consider HV as a last resort on a retrofit where there is no way to run larger ducts.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,900
    If your building a new house. No reason to go HV.
    As above, a VS blower can do as much for humidity removal.
    If your really concerned about humidty. Get a 2 stage with VS, and a stat that can do cool to dehumidify, and slow the blower.
    It will cost you about the same as a HV system.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    70
    I've sen HV systems with a hot water coil for heat that worked great. They were very good for the service department as they must be serviced more often. Get the evap coil a little dirty and you are in for nightmares. Filer changes are essiential. Ensure they are installed with the service tech in mind.

  6. #6
    thanks guys...i'll stick with tried and true - no HV

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pamnyra VA.
    Posts
    710
    nothing wrong about h.v. it really depends on what look your going for your home. if you want to look at 12 x 4 diffusers go convential. if you want something more discreet go with h . v. it is true about the seer ratio sucking with h.v. if i had the money i would install a h.v. system. nothing wrong with them as long as the installer knows what they are doing.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    26
    Take a look at Velocity Plus, 13 seer and very quiet. Overall the 3 inch version is about 30% less than competition and has the comfort of true aspiration.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    18951
    Posts
    1,593
    Quote Originally Posted by skibme View Post
    nothing wrong about h.v. it really depends on what look your going for your home. if you want to look at 12 x 4 diffusers go convential. if you want something more discreet go with h . v. it is true about the seer ratio sucking with h.v. if i had the money i would install a h.v. system. nothing wrong with them as long as the installer knows what they are doing.
    I put an attic a/c system in for someone once and the woman said "oh my God, I didn't know I'd have to be looking at those things in the ceiling". 6 months later she told me she doesn't even notice them anymore.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,837
    Forget AC. Don't recommend it. Waste of money. What I would recommend is a Hybrid Heat system that will be an investment instead of an expenditure. heat your home with your AC system during the shoulder months (Sept., Oct, Nov, March, April, May) and use the same system for cooling in the summer. Or better yet, if you care to make an even better investment, go with geothermal. You'll be able to heat/cool your home for a fraction of what a conventional fossil fuel system will cost. Installation costs are about 15-20% higher than fossil fuel but the operational savings will pay for the entire system within about 10-years. Want radiant heated floors? You can do that too with a geothermal system. If geothermal is too much for your construction budget (personallly, I'd use cheap kitchen cabinets and put in the geothermal system if the budget is tight but that's just my opinion) then I'd highly recommend a 2-stage Hybrid Heat system with a 3-stage gas furnace, variable speed, giving you 5-stages of heat and 2-stages of cool. If your new home doesn't have natural gas on the street, then that's even more incentive to go geo. But if all else fails, you can still do dual fuel with oil heat. So there's bascially no limitation (except your budget) to put in a first class, state of the art system that will operate for thousands of dollars a year less than a basic AC system.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

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