Two returns: one each for summer/winter? - Page 5
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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
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    11,808
    copied from Dr Joe

  2. #54
    Learn something new on this site every day since I joined.been in const. and hvac all my life. I've always sealed my returns but have never thought about sealing the supplies.All the schools and all the experience no one ever mentioned this.It will definitely be something I do from now on.Thanks for the tips.

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
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    11,274
    Quote Originally Posted by Carnak View Post
    copied from Dr Joe
    Just how the heck do you pronounce that guy's last name, anyway? Every time I read it my mind gets tongue twisted. Seriously, when my monthly ASHRAE Journal arrives, the first article I go looking for is Dr. Joe's. Always a good fun read...very informative as well.

    Mississippi, I'm glad to hear it. That is what it's all about. Your customers from now on will be lucky to have you doing their work.

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SW Virginia (Roanoke)
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    48
    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdriver View Post
    I'm going to let it dry overnight, then post some photos in the morning before doing the other seven.
    Attached is a photo the upslope side of the ceiling where there was no contact at all with the sheet rock; this is where I used the fiberglass mesh.

    The downslope side and the two side pieces are unremarkable, because I was able to get a mastic bead under the lip of the entire length of the sheet metal before securing them with the truss-head screws.

    Comments?
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by tigerdriver; 03-01-2008 at 01:03 PM. Reason: typos;

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    Just how the heck do you pronounce that guy's last name, anyway? Every time I read it my mind gets tongue twisted. Seriously, when my monthly ASHRAE Journal arrives, the first article I go looking for is Dr. Joe's.
    My understanding is the name is pronounced "Stee-brek". Cannot remember who told me that pronunciation, but for the longest time I had been saying "Luh-stee-bu-rek" or something like that.

    Sorry about the offense from when I said "dwelling on trivia". That just came out wrong, it was entirely in my mind, a reference to another long time poster who has posted on this very subject. A couple of our more helpful posters have said all the things I should have said, and better.

    Hope this helps -- Pstu

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
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    11,274
    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdriver View Post
    Attached is a photo the upslope side of the ceiling where there was no contact at all with the sheet rock; this is where I used the fiberglass mesh.

    The downslope side and the two side pieces are unremarkable, because I was able to get a mastic bead under the lip of the entire length of the sheet metal before securing them with the truss-head screws.

    Comments?
    I don't know what's going on here, but your attached pics don't show up again. I've read others here with similar problems in other posts...they can't see the attached pics but others can. Weird.

    Could you post the links again like you did last time? Again, your geek badge is intact. There may be something screwy going on with either h-talk's software or how it interacts with various firewalls...I make no claims to earning a geek badge yet...at least for IT related stuff. HVAC geek badge, maybe...

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,274
    Quote Originally Posted by pstu View Post
    My understanding is the name is pronounced "Stee-brek". Cannot remember who told me that pronunciation, but for the longest time I had been saying "Luh-stee-bu-rek" or something like that.

    Sorry about the offense from when I said "dwelling on trivia". That just came out wrong, it was entirely in my mind, a reference to another long time poster who has posted on this very subject. A couple of our more helpful posters have said all the things I should have said, and better.

    Hope this helps -- Pstu
    Pstu, no problem, we're good.

    Thanks for the pronunciation enlightenment, as I also was reading it as "luh-stee-bur-ek" or "li-stur-bek" or something...I didn't even try to say it out loud. "Stee-brek" is much easier on both the mental and "out loud" tongue.

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    the floor boot in the ceiling picture shows up now.

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    448
    I had the exact same problem in my great room. In the winter, the only way to eliminate stratification was to run the ceiling fan. When I ran another return down close to the floor, directly under the existing high level return, and closed the high level return, the stratification was GONE! I assume it's because it's now collecting all the cold air off of the floor, allowing the heat to come all the way down. I used three stud spaces, since I had no other elegant way to run a duct. Works like a champ! And I close the lower return and open the upper one in summer. Trying to figure out how to automate this for heating/cooling mode...

    Quote Originally Posted by tigerdriver View Post
    Greetings folks,

    I have a large great room with a high peaked ceiling. The air handler is installed in the attic of the adjacent garage. (The emergency overflow is well designed--I tested it with a garden hose.)

    There are eight output registers on the pitched ceiling a a foot or so from the wall.

    There is a single return at the ceiling peak, adjacent to the garage. (Photo attached.)

    I got to thinking (always dangerous )...shouldn't there be two returns: the (existing) high one for summer to intake the warmed cooling air; and a second one nearer the floor for winter, to take in cooled hearing air? I would open/close them appropriately when I switched between heating to cooling. A second return could easily be installed below the first (on the wall behind the TV).

    Comments?

    Thanks in advance,

    Joe

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    15,790
    Off subject a little, Joe thats a nice!! wall unit.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
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  11. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SW Virginia (Roanoke)
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    48
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    I don't know what's going on here, but your attached pics don't show up again. I've read others here with similar problems in other posts...they can't see the attached pics but others can. Weird.

    Could you post the links again like you did last time? Again, your geek badge is intact. There may be something screwy going on with either h-talk's software or how it interacts with various firewalls...I make no claims to earning a geek badge yet...at least for IT related stuff. HVAC geek badge, maybe...
    Yeah, something's weird. I couldn't see it this morning because the forum software incorrectly rendered it as a GIF. Now it's working correctly.

    Anyway, the link on my web site is here.

    BTW, the seven remaining boots were in far, far worse condition than the one shown in the photo. The nylon drywall mesh technique came in very handy!

    One of the real surprises was how quite the room is without the registers in place. I'm hoping that the adjustable vanes on the new ones I've ordered won't add back much noise. In retrospect, perhaps I should have purchased simple diffusers with adjustable vanes.

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,274
    Your patch job looks very good. Thumb's up.

    If you're purchasing the type of registers I think you may be, I believe you'll find them more quiet than the ones you have now. You'll still have a little rushing of air sound, unless for some reason a few of your boots are receiving a lot more air than the others, which then would lead toward an air balancing issue.

    When you get everything all patched up and the new registers installed, please give us an update. Looks good so far...

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    SW Virginia (Roanoke)
    Posts
    48
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    Your patch job looks very good. Thumb's up.

    If you're purchasing the type of registers I think you may be, I believe you'll find them more quiet than the ones you have now. You'll still have a little rushing of air sound, unless for some reason a few of your boots are receiving a lot more air than the others, which then would lead toward an air balancing issue.
    I'm using Hart & Cooley A611-104. I chose this one because the adjustable vanes run on the 10" axis, which will let me direct some of the air toward the wall and some into the room.

    Since I opened up all these registers, I've got a lot more pressure at the (20" x 14") return--so much that the inrush air is quite noisy--sort of like someone running a vacuum cleaner in the next room. The diffuser currently has fixed downward-looking vanes. For the time being, I've removed it (leaving the filter in place). If this noise persists after I get the new ceiling registers in place, I'll revisit the issue.

    I also want to become educated on air filters. I'm currently using inexpensive pleated filters from Lowe's. I understand the benefit of pleats (increased filtration area), but something tells me that better performance can be had with different filtrate materials. Any info on this subject would be appreciated.

    P.S.
    If I seem really dumb about all this, it's because I spent the last 40 years living in Berkeley, CA right on the SF Bay. The climate is moderate the year round. Homes there typically don't have AC; in fact, my 1929 Craftsman Bungalow still had its original gravity fed furnace--which we turned on maybe five or six times a year....so I've got a lot to learn.

    Again, thanks for all your support.

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