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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    I guess if the wiring is correct, I'm left to wonder what the problem may be. It just doesn't seem right that a new unit would be using considerably more electricity compared to an old one in the winter. I haven't seen many complaints on here about the electric usage so it seems like something must be unique with my situation. All the numbers that the installer tested for appear to be inline with what they should be so I don't know what to think now. I guess I have until May to decide to have them rip this unit out and try something else but as far as efficiency is concerned, I didn't see too many units out there that were as efficient as this unit was so it'll be fun trying to find an alternative system.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,046
    Quote Originally Posted by s012adh View Post
    I guess if the wiring is correct, I'm left to wonder what the problem may be. It just doesn't seem right that a new unit would be using considerably more electricity compared to an old one in the winter. I haven't seen many complaints on here about the electric usage so it seems like something must be unique with my situation. All the numbers that the installer tested for appear to be inline with what they should be so I don't know what to think now. I guess I have until May to decide to have them rip this unit out and try something else but as far as efficiency is concerned, I didn't see too many units out there that were as efficient as this unit was so it'll be fun trying to find an alternative system.

    You have several problems from what I can see. The dip switches are incorect for your equipment and heater size.

    The airflow is set for 3.5 tons not 3.
    The airflow selected for aux heat is only 900 cfm for 20 KW.

    W1/W2/W3 are tied together giving you 20 KW for defrost and aux.

    After re-setting the dip switches and adjusting the charge, there are several choices that you can make. Have the auxillary heat devided with outdoor Tstats or switch to the Honeywell IAQ and seperate it and get auxillary heat indication on the screen.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by second opinion View Post
    You have several problems from what I can see. The dip switches are incorect for your equipment and heater size.

    The airflow is set for 3.5 tons not 3.
    The airflow selected for aux heat is only 900 cfm for 20 KW.

    W1/W2/W3 are tied together giving you 20 KW for defrost and aux.

    After re-setting the dip switches and adjusting the charge, there are several choices that you can make. Have the auxillary heat devided with outdoor Tstats or switch to the Honeywell IAQ and seperate it and get auxillary heat indication on the screen.
    Ideally what should the dip switches be set to?

    So should W1-W3 not be tied together? What disadvantage does this provide?

    When you talk about the aux heat being divided with an outdoor thermostat, what are u referring to here? I have an outdoor thermostat on the unit and currently have my thermostat set so that aux heat doesn't come on above 40 degrees, even if I raise the thermostat several degrees. I have tested this part and no that it works.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    What do you have for T-stat? (didn't see it off hand.)

    I would suggest the IAQ, that can stage 3 stage of the electric heat to advoid putting it all on at once.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    It's a Trane 802 thermostat.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    Quote Originally Posted by s012adh View Post
    It's a Trane 802 thermostat.
    is X2 and W1 is wired at the t-stat?

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by mayguy View Post
    is X2 and W1 is wired at the t-stat?
    Yes it is.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    Quote Originally Posted by s012adh View Post
    Yes it is.
    As Second Opinion pointed out..
    2/W3 are tied together giving you 20 KW for defrost and aux.
    The installer wired wrong in away, really you do NOT need all that heat on at once.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,046
    Look at your thermostat wiring diagram page # 4 figure #10. You can seperate your auxilary heat with BAYSTAT250 mounted outdoors or you can purchase the Honeywell IAQ and stage the electric with 2 stages.

    Make sure that your outdoor Tstat wire is run in a seperate cable.

    Try staging them at 30/20 degrees.

    Have them change your dip switches for #7 and #8 to OFF/OFF for your electric heat.

    You should not need 65500 btus for suplimental heat and defrost. You should see your power consumption drop after the changes.

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    oregon
    Posts
    885
    Use the tcont803 stat with the xl16i OR the 9000 IAQ stat. As has been stated already, split the strips 10/10 half for aux half for defrost.
    Genius = The guy who can do anything...except make a living!

  11. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elkton, MD
    Posts
    141
    The XL16i heat pump is an excellent product when the system has been installed correctly. There are several considerations when determining whether the problems you are encountering are application or product related.
    1) The maximum lineset length is 80 feet with a maximum vertical lift of 25 feet.
    2) The dipswitches must be configured correctly for CFM and Outdoor unit tonnage.
    3) A 16 SEER unit is only 16 SEER during the cooling season. The HSPF(Heating Seasonal Performance Factor) of this unit may not be much higher than the HSPF of a 13 SEER product.
    4) These units are oftem mis-wired by the installing contractor. The product installation manual requires that this unit be wired as a TWO STEP and the contractor often wires as a TWO STAGE. As the unit utilizes a single compressor that is staged at 67% first stage and 100% second stage it has different airflow requirements than a two stage product that is 50% capacity stage one and 100% stage two.
    5)The thermostat may have the capability of locking out the auxilary heat above a pre-determined adjustable outdoor temperature when utilized with an outdoor temperature sensor. If the control does not have this capability have the contractor install a TAYSTAT250 outdoor thermostat to prevent operation of electric heat.
    6) The indoor coil should be an ARI rated match to provide proper capacity and HSPF/SEER. The XL16i has a HSPF between 8.3 and 9.2 when matched with an ARI rated coil. If the match-up is not ARI rated it could be less than expected.

    This is an abbreviated list of common application errors and may not resolve your issue.

    Good luck!

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Elkton, MD
    Posts
    141

    Xl16

    The product ratings may be found at http://www.aridirectory.org
    Last edited by hvac-master; 02-04-2008 at 02:26 PM.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    55
    Quote Originally Posted by hvac-master View Post
    The XL16i heat pump is an excellent product when the system has been installed correctly. There are several considerations when determining whether the problems you are encountering are application or product related.
    1) The maximum lineset length is 80 feet with a maximum vertical lift of 25 feet.
    2) The dipswitches must be configured correctly for CFM and Outdoor unit tonnage.
    3) A 16 SEER unit is only 16 SEER during the cooling season. The HSPF(Heating Seasonal Performance Factor) of this unit may not be much higher than the HSPF of a 13 SEER product.
    4) These units are oftem mis-wired by the installing contractor. The product installation manual requires that this unit be wired as a TWO STEP and the contractor often wires as a TWO STAGE. As the unit utilizes a single compressor that is staged at 67% first stage and 100% second stage it has different airflow requirements than a two stage product that is 50% capacity stage one and 100% stage two.
    5)The thermostat may have the capability of locking out the auxilary heat above a pre-determined adjustable outdoor temperature when utilized with an outdoor temperature sensor. If the control does not have this capability have the contractor install a TAYSTAT250 outdoor thermostat to prevent operation of electric heat.
    6) The indoor coil should be an ARI rated match to provide proper capacity and HSPF/SEER. The XL16i has a HSPF between 8.3 and 9.2 when matched with an ARI rated coil. If the match-up is not ARI rated it could be less than expected.

    This is an abbreviated list of common application errors and may not resolve your issue.

    Good luck!
    Well the installer (as well as the president of the company) is coming out next Tuesday to take a look at things. I know according to ARI, my specific unit has an HSPF of 8.75. From the recommendations of other people here, it sounds like the dip switches are set incorrectly. As far as wiring it up for 2 stage vs. 2 step, I don't know if that is the case...Is that something you can gleam off the pictures I took of the wiring? I do currently have the thermostat locking out aux heat above 40 degrees and have tested this and it seems to be working correctly.

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