photo or diagram of seal hvac compressor
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11

    photo or diagram of seal hvac compressor

    I would like to see a drawing of what the mechanism looks like inside the typical sealed unit 1-4 ton HVAC compressor. Everyone can relate to what an external compressor looks like with a motor, pulley, and actual compressor but I've always wondered what is in those pot belly looking sealed up things with input and output tubing and voltage terminals.

    I've considered taking a grinder to a burn-out just to see what it looks like but I my curiousity is not quite that high, at least not yet.

    A nice photo or diagram or even description would be great.

    tks
    2_cold

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    580
    Here's a scroll:
    http://www.emersonclimate.com/AcCope...e_reliable.htm

    And somebody already took a grinder to one-save you the trouble:
    http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/...ad.php?t=64784

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    houston, texas
    Posts
    3,787
    HUHHH??
    I'm not tolerating Political Correctness anymore, from now on it's tell it like it is.

    Veto Pro Pak - The best tool bag you'll ever own






  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11

    Hmm reason for asking

    My main reason for asking for a photo was to see if the freon serves as a coolant for the stator wiring. I can't tell from the pix however. Does the return freon flow over everything? Does anyone know? Reason for curiousity is to understand if a burnout burns magnet wire enamel that gets into the freon and contaminates everything. I've always heard that said, but if the freon is really limited to a sealed up mechanism not including the windings it doesn't seem like that would happen.

    Those photos look like the cheap chinese air tool compressors that you get these days where the motor shaft and compressor shaft is all one thing. Not that I have anything against them. Its the only kind I could afford to buy.

    tks for interesting photos always wondered besides my question about burnout.

    best regards
    2cold

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Las Vegas NV
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by 2cold_in_nh View Post
    My main reason for asking for a photo was to see if the freon serves as a coolant for the stator wiring. 2cold
    Yes, welded HVACR compressors, recips or scrolls, are refrigerant cooled.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    820
    Quote Originally Posted by 2cold_in_nh View Post
    I would like to see a drawing of what the mechanism looks like inside the typical sealed unit 1-4 ton HVAC compressor. Everyone can relate to what an external compressor looks like with a motor, pulley, and actual compressor but I've always wondered what is in those pot belly looking sealed up things with input and output tubing and voltage terminals.

    I've considered taking a grinder to a burn-out just to see what it looks like but I my curiousity is not quite that high, at least not yet.

    A nice photo or diagram or even description would be great.

    tks
    2_cold
    how about buying a book, doing some research on the internet, or taking a class.....since your that curious. Also add some info to your damm profile.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    604
    When you describe your desire to learn what you describe, the only thing that comes to mind, is; that you'd like to know why someone has told you ( again ) that you should replace the refrigerant after a burnout.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Hells Kitchen, Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    318
    Refrigerant flows over the windings...Thats why if you are holding the hose and your hand and blow some on a rag to check the oils condition you can get shocked by static electricity...Its also why liquid restrictions take out compressors...If your suction line coming back to the compressor isn't < 58ish the compressor will cycle on internal winding thermostat...If you have gauges with a site glass you can see black liquid in there after a burn out...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    11

    Thumbs up just want the facts

    No need to get your knickers in a knot over it. I fully accept that the refrigerant has to be replaced and that there has to be a lot of cleanup after a burnout.

    I'd just like to understand the mechanics of the whole process why compressors are all sealed up etc. Now I know. I actually did quite a bit of googling and drilling thru web pages and didn't find the answers.

    I can see now why industrial grade systems are made the way they are. They spend more money on external motors that are self cooled. But if a motor blows its just a motor not the whole system. I'm sure the market is such that a home system that is made that way wouldn't sell due to the cost despite the fact that they may last forever.

    As it is, these sealed up things are simply a time bomb waiting to blow after a few years of use/abuse if they weren't installed properly and its practically impossible to install them without contaminants getting in unlike totally closed units like refrigerators or self contained window units.

    tks for all the feedback guys even the suggestion to go to hvac school and join the trade.
    2Cool

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