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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Kansas City, Kansas, United States
    Posts
    13,832
    All of it.

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,073
    Supertek!

    Good to see you back!

  3. #42
    I c what you trying to say, but those videos also help students like me.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,641
    Quote Originally Posted by KevinAdv View Post
    in my experience people don't want to do even the most basic stuff once the condensate line was tied under a sink and the hose connecting it was a little too big and had a slow drip I explained go to home depot get a smaller hose and replace it and they said no I'd rather just have you do it

    Automotive Diy has been around forever and there are still thousands upon thousands of garages open
    I work on all my own cars but hardly know anybody else that works on there own car
    It strongly depends on the area economy, income level and the dominant occupation. Most people are poor in one of the two ways. There are two resources we value. Time and money. There are those who willing to spend half a day DIYing something in order to avoid spending a few hundred dollars and there are those who won't blink an eye at the thought of dropping a grand to avoid having to waste their scarce free time. Really understanding your market is important.

    For some people, lowest cost is the key and they'll compromise in other ways. For some people, having you show not one minute late, every foot step cleaned up, program their thermostat to the new schedule they left you on the note and they don't mind spending the extra $$$ to not have to use their time dealing with it.
    Beer can cold bandit stoled my superheat.

  5. #44
    I think I have learned more watching YouTube videos than in school.

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tidewater Virginia
    Posts
    127
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacker View Post
    If I own something I want to be able to fix it w/o some regulators saying NO!. Most anything you can buy will have install instructions with it. Today we can buy parts to fix most things and I don't want that to change. If I $crew it up worse, so be it.
    Wholesalers sometimes/usually have a "to the trade only" policy. Part of that can be complaints from contractors protecting their turf. I understand that. Grainger's sells to anyone but their pricing for civilians is book price and contractors (IF they buy enough) get better pricing.
    Like Timebuilder I was commercial/industrial contractor so if Joe Public wanted to fix his gadget I didn't care. I wouldn't have cared if I was a resi contractor either because I believe ownership includes the right to attempt anything with your property. Fix it, destroy it, sell it, whatever.
    I don't think the role of Government, in most cases, is to protect me from myself.
    The trade only sale limitation has more to do with liability and legality than protecting your market although as my supplier, the parts houses would choose to keep my $500,000 a year in purchases over a $1000 one time sale. The biggest worry for most parts houses has to do with the risk taken when something happens like a DIY buying a gauge set and flash burns a hand when taking a hose off. In today's litigious society, even if you win in court, the costs mean the only winners are the lawyers.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Tidewater Virginia
    Posts
    127
    I don't have a problem with DIYers trying to fix their property as long as they realize a couple of things:

    I have spent my career finding, assembling and assimilating the information and experience I use to troubleshoot and repair their equipment and that learning process has cost me money and time, therefore my assistance in correcting a problem is not free.

    You can pay me up front or after it-go-boom, but up front will usually get you a better, quieter, more long lived, reliable and energy efficient system.

    If you FUBAR, I will have to put things back, before I can begin to troubleshoot the problem(s) and may have to correct your errors before finding the original problems. All this takes time, knowledge, experience and cost money and will not be free.

    I have a sheet on the back cover of a notebook from Heat Pump Skills Center which says, "You can have your job good, fast, cheap... Pick two." :-)

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,335
    I just read back through this thread, and I realized that I did not address an aviation question. If that person is still monitoring this thread, I will be happy to explain the aviation employment dynamic.

    As for the recent poster who says he learned more about the trade on videos, I would suggest he needed a better school, or a better teacher.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

    AOP Forum Rules:







  9. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    7,073
    Quote Originally Posted by verysick View Post
    I think I have learned more watching YouTube videos than in school.
    That's scary, because some of the YouTube "experts" are putting out bad and sometimes dangerous information.

    How do you know that what you learned on YouTube is correct?

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