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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    2,197
    kmcconnell

    While the lockout on your strip heat at 35 degree is a good idea, I really doubt if this will solve your problems. And with all those extra BTUs from being oversized, I would lower the lockout even further.

    Yes, your HP can go into defrost mode with an outside temp of 48 degrees as well as other existing conditions. I think I would want the defrost function checked out on this system. Defrost at this temp usually is unlikely.

    IMO

  2. #28
    tigerdunes or anyone else
    What would be a good aux lockout setting 25 or 30?

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Haymarket, Northern Virginia
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by OlManRivah View Post
    It's a shame to have such a nice system and these problems. The fact that you're not getting fault codes is a good sign. ......
    The faults don't stay up on the screen all the time. They may be up for a minute or two and then drop off. You have to go into the Install/Service screen and look at "Last 10 Fault Codes" or something like that.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Haymarket, Northern Virginia
    Posts
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by kmcconnell View Post
    tigerdunes or anyone else
    What would be a good aux lockout setting 25 or 30?
    With the size of your units I would try to set it low and see how it works for you. I have my Aux Heat set to off right now and my 4 ton Infinity unit runs on low stage down around 25. In the low 20s and teens it runs on high stage. I usually have the wood stove running when it gets below freezing and that seems to be a good secondary source of heat for us. I guess you would call that a manual hybrid system.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    Quote Originally Posted by kmcconnell View Post
    tigerdunes or anyone else
    What would be a good aux lockout setting 25 or 30?

    i have mine set to 15 degrees

    yours may vary, my system is a little oversized (on purpose) and a 2 speeder!



    .

  6. #32
    belcherwm -
    I checked the "Last 10 Fault Codes" and there wasn't any listed. Also the last two digits of the software version was 08.

    Airmechanical -
    i have mine set to 15 degrees
    At what temperature does a HP stop geting heat out of the air? I know conditions vary, but in general.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    The South
    Posts
    2,197
    kmcconnell

    There is heat in the air even well below an outside temperature of less than zero deg fah. The problem is being able to efficiently capture this heat and then transmitting it where it is needed.

    Your BTU output and eff begins to drop off significantly usually around 30 degrees. That is why backup heat either strip or fossil fuel is required.

    Since it appears you are well oversized with your HP systems, I suggest dropping your aux lockout to 30 degrees. Try this and if comfort is being maintained, then go to 27. You get the idea-trial and error. Keep in mind everyone's comfort level is different.

    IMO

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmcconnell View Post
    belcherwm -
    I checked the "Last 10 Fault Codes" and there wasn't any listed. Also the last two digits of the software version was 08.

    Airmechanical -

    At what temperature does a HP stop geting heat out of the air? I know conditions vary, but in general.
    i would say a few degrees below zero


    .

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by kmcconnell View Post
    belcherwm -
    I checked the "Last 10 Fault Codes" and there wasn't any listed. Also the last two digits of the software version was 08.

    Airmechanical -

    At what temperature does a HP stop geting heat out of the air? I know conditions vary, but in general.
    First, there really is no such thing as "in general" to trained technicians. As to heat in the Air, it will contain Heat down to -460 degrees Fahrenheit, AKA 0 degrees Kelvin, AKA "absolute zero" where all motion stops, because all energy (including heat energy) is absent. As to the point at which the HP stops getting heat out of the Air, the correct Question should be "What is the lowest temperature in my environment that allows for the efficient and useful extraction of heat?" The truth is that's a hard question to answer "from my house" as they say. Please understand that I'm not trying to be flippant. It's just that in order to answer your question I would have to be familiar with both your environment, and the equipment you have.

    I understand you feel screwed by your contractor, and I'd say its possible you were, there are plenty of contractors and technicians that shouldn't be let near the equipment they work on every day. It's sad but true. So what do you do? - here's my two cents-

    As others have suggested call Carrier directly. Explain the situation. Tell them you want satisfaction, and that you picked their brand because you wanted the best equipment possible, but there is something clearly wrong with the system and you want your money's worth. Tell them you want to find a Carrier contractor with a NATE certified technician with multiple "service" certifications - not just one- Ideally HEAT PUMP and AIR DISTRIBUTION certifications. Also RSES CM or CMS certifications are excellent verification of the technician's knowledge. Ask for proof of certification when the technician arrives. They are supposed to carry it with them, and if certified they will be happy to show you. After you know you are dealing with a skilled technician, Let them do whatever they feel the need to do to properly assess the situation. This may take some time, looking over someone else's work can be involved. Even if you have to pay to have this done, you will be glad you did in the long haul. The more skilled technicians in our industry are few and far between and the ones who are less so will only cause your system more harm, and cause you more expense.

    If you would like feel free to call me, my number is on my website.

    I wish you all the best of luck.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  10. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    As to heat in the Air, it will contain Heat down to -460 degrees Fahrenheit, AKA 0 degrees Kelvin, AKA "absolute zero" where all motion stops,Please understand that I'm not trying to be flippant. there are plenty of contractors and technicians that shouldn't be let near the equipment they work on every day. It's sad but true.
    you must be feeling a little flippant ha?

    how many nate patches do you own!



    .

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmechanical View Post
    you must be feeling a little flippant ha?

    how many nate patches do you own!



    .
    One.

    Two really but I don't count the install cert. I should mention that I know guys that have multiple certs. One of which took three service tests in one day and scored in the high ninety's for all of them. He was one of the NATE seven competing for the TOP TECH title at COMFORTECH 07' and a personal friend of mine. A really great guy to boot.

    I plan on testing for several more.

    And, no, I'm not being flippant. Any one who's been around for a while knows that there are far too many people in the trade who don't have a clue. I hate to see HO's trusting the salesman of some contractor that promises the world to the customer, but in the end is only capable of delivering junk.

    I just came from a HO's house who was complaining of poor airflow on the second floor. Cold rooms. When I tell them why this happens and what they might need to do to fix it, people often have a hard time believing me, or I look like the bad guy. Typical "shoot the messenger " stuff. I hate that. You should too.

    How would you advise the HO as to the best method of determining the quality of a contractor or technician?
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  12. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    How would you advise the HO as to the best method of determining the quality of a contractor or technician?
    i would advise them to get a list of referals and contact them to see how problems were resolved

    some guys can go out and pass every nate test there is cause they are (book smart)

    then when it comes time to fix a system they start hacking and changing parts

    i cant tell you the percentage of nate techs that are hacks and parts changers

    but i can tell you there are some!

    and also i know of a few companies in town that send one man to pass nate tests

    then every van in the company gets a nate sticker!



    .

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmechanical View Post
    i would advise them to get a list of referals and contact them to see how problems were resolved

    some guys can go out and pass every nate test there is cause they are (book smart)

    then when it comes time to fix a system they start hacking and changing parts

    i cant tell you the percentage of nate techs that are hacks and parts changers

    but i can tell you there are some!

    and also i know of a few companies in town that send one man to pass nate tests

    then every van in the company gets a nate sticker!



    .
    I won't try to argue any of that, It's not really worth my time or yours.

    I'll even add to your point. There are Technicians out there that could pass the NATE exams but don't take them. But how does the customer know the difference? NATE isn't really for the technician, it's for the home owner, so they can talk to someone that is at the least technically competent. By asking the HO to gather references you are asking other HO's to be the judge. Do you really think that's the best route? I don't. Our field is far too technical for the average HO to understand. And if they do get a competent contractor from recommendations, what if they aren't up to speed on the Infinity system? or heat pumps?

    last thought-

    I said to ask for the Tech's certification when they arrive.

    I'd rather have a technician that was proven to be "book smart" as you put it, than one who wasn't.

    Keep in mind I put my money where my mouth is. I'm NATE and I hire NATE.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


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