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  1. #53
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,423
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike19 View Post
    Isn't that the meter with the youtube video where it erupts into a big fireball?
    If you put it in mA mode and put it across bus bars on a 480v panel, then you can make it do that. If you're talking safety, you should insist on "CAT III 1,000v CAT IV 600v" over brand/prestige/price. Never handle electricity or refrigerants, pressurized gas without wearing ANSI rated safety goggles.
    Beer can cold bandit stoled my superheat.

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    324
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike19 View Post
    I think I really take all the tools I have for granted.

    A few weeks back one of the vans was in the shop, so I had to pair up with another tech for a day, and literally all he has is some basic hand tools, a drill, a set of analogs and a multimeter.

    How on earth can you work in this trade without owning a thermometer? He didn't have a thermometer, he didn't even have a k-type thermocouple to plug into his meter.
    I was in the same predicimate the other day and it is indeed a fact that I do take all my goodeeze for granted until I am without them. I recently got a new (to me...lol) van and it was out for the afternoon getting lettered so I was running calls with one of our younger guys. We wound up having to do a leak repair and it took everything I had not to scream in fustration when my answer to "Where's your micron gauge gonna go?" was "Where is what gonna go?" as he was hooking up his manifold to the unit and vacuum pump. Then I got the "deer in the headlights" look again as we went to charge the system and I asked where his temp. clamp was and how are you going to check your subcooling and superheat elicited the remarks of "Do you really check all that stuff on every job?

    This stuff really bugs me and I understand that everyone cant afford to have all the latest and greatest but these IMO are basic tools of the trade, just like a 5/16" nutdriver should be. Its when its out of ignorance that it really bugs me. The other day I was walking by 3 of our sales guys and I know I shouldnt be surprised what I heard but one who just got out of trade school recently was commenting on how inaccurate "those digital gauges" are and how they were completely wrong when compared to his "analogs" I mostly just use it (digital manifold) to pull a vacuum because that is all its good for.........hahahaha

    After over-hearing this I couldnt resist walking over and making a comment so I went up to this genious and asked him if he had ever considered that maybe the analog gauges were the ones that were inaccurate? I just got the same blank stare Ive gotten plenty of times before from these guys and after a few seconds he pipes up and says, "Ya know, I hadnt thought about that." Hmm, miracles do still happen I guess.

    I used analogs for a long time but never really insulted anyones use of digi's. I have gotten comments like, "what a waste of money for residential" and stuff like that but I just ignore it. I havent found any of my tools to be a waste of money. Usually, when I plop down some good coin on something, its because I'm convinced that the investment will make a portion of my job easier or more accurate or both. I know there are some folks out there that are just gadget crazy or just have to get the latest thing to show up the next guy but so far that hasnt been the case for me at least. If I dont absolutely see a genuine need for it, I do without. Money is too hard to come by these days.
    l8r

  3. #55
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    42
    Dachipsta,

    Good post.
    I have been trying to get the distribution channel to realize the value in having a class 0.05% calibration gauge at every parts house. (Not sure if the correct picture is attached)
    This way service technicians, (the ones that actually care about quality ) can at a minimum bring in their analog or digital manifolds for a free pressure calibration.
    The REF-CLASS-GAUGE costs too much for a normal working man to buy, but if a parts house bought one or two for their branch locations, it would be a good reason for tech's to come in and see them. Also a good tool / service to use during an open house or lunch and learn sessions.

    This is assuming your gauges have an adjustment screw.

    I am shocked of how few technicians know the difference in-between blank, 3-2-3, 1.6 & Class 1.0 gauges.
    You all should be using nothing less than Class 1.6 gauges and have then calibrated at least every 3 months regardless of the manufacturer.
    Gauges are sensitive, one drop could throw them off. Much less bouncing around in the back of your truck.
    One thing I have noticed in Germany & Switzerland the service techs always keep their manifolds in a case. In the U.S. it seems common to hang them up on their hook and let them swing. Although, I do believe the US techs do more service calls per day than in Europe.
    No judgment here, just stating an observation.

    In Italy and France, it is mandatory to re-certify your electronic leak detectors each year for accuracy.



    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,551
    Expat does your 1.35 CFM vacuum pump really pull to 15 microns?
    It spirit of the thread it does come with a higher price than some others in that size but none spec that low so I can see paying extra if it out performs the others. Also is the smiley face a euro thing? To me it looks unprofessional and I'm sure my customers would feel the same. Is it just stickers?

  5. #57
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    42
    Hey Iceman,

    You are still on my list for field testing.
    Yes, it will if you use the right and fresh oil and a good enough digital micron gauge.
    Running a test right now so I can feel 100% confident about this post. Within 5 min it is down to 19 microns.
    I will let it run over lunch and see if it goes down to 15 microns. Will post a pic if I can figure out how.
    And yes, they are expensive, but they really are made here in Switzerland.
    The smiley face is just tradition. There are two assembly bolts that make the eyes, the mouth is a sticker.
    I've seen guys draw in fangs on the pump face, if a smile is not your style.

    Normally, I would just put a micron gauge right onto the pump to check both operations before doing any evacuation.
    Just to know your tools are in good working order.

    Honestly there is no need to pull a vacuum that low.
    Also, at that level the accuracy of most standard micron gauges is +/- 10 microns. So go figure.

    Not a sales rep, but the real beauty of the RL series of pumps is their size and weight compared to their performance.
    They are universal here in Europe, everyone uses them.

    Will send pic and test results.
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  6. #58
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    42
    Update.

    Iceman,

    On the first run it only got to 19 microns.
    I switched the micron gauge because I know one of my test micron gauges leaks.
    Second run with the same RL-2 pump 35 L/Min. (1.25CM) and a different REFCO micron gauge pulled it down to 14.8.
    I snapped the pic at 15.0 microns and then after 10 more min it rose up to 16.4 microns.

    I would guess the pump metal, the sweeps, or the oil got warm and it lost a little.
    So, yea they will do it.

    I have seen a few pull down to 10 microns before if everything is really tight.

    Send me your e-mail and I will send you the picture. I don't know how to post it on this forum.
    Regards,
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  7. #59
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    42
    Figured it out.

    [IMG]C:\Users\PowellS\Desktop\Calibratiion gauge.JPG[/IMG]



    [IMG]C:\Users\PowellS\Desktop\RL-2 at 15.0 Microns.JPG[/IMG]
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    wedged in freezer shelf
    Posts
    6,551
    No you didn't


  9. #61
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Warren, MI
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by Expat in CH View Post
    Dachipsta,

    In Italy and France, it is mandatory to re-certify your electronic leak detectors each year for accuracy.
    In other countries many other things are different. Here we follow electrical codes for wiring whereas in some other countries, they wire and use test equipment not even sold here to test/verify their work.

    In some countries as part of mandatory safety tests on automobiles they test your brake fluid more moisture content. Just like refrigerant oil, brake fluid absorbs moisture like a sponge.
    Bill

  10. #62
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    42
    Hey WPTSKI,

    Yea, some things are great, other things.... not so much. It all seems to balance out in the end though.
    It just depends on what YOU think is important.
    I was talking to a Toshiba dealer here in CH and they said that every system is, "supposed" to be checked for leaks every year. It rarely happens and seems not to be enforced on residential systems. I.E. Duct Free Splits.
    England is going the same way and Germany is close behind.

    They are even beginning to track 100% of the refrigerant even the recovered refrigerant(s).
    I think the "screws" are just turned a bit tighter here because the Western European governments have had more time to torque them as compared to the U.S.

    Some of it is B.S. some of it is not but your right. It is definitely different.
    "He who works with his hands is a laborer.
    He who works with his hands & his head is a craftsman.
    He who works with his hands, his head & his heart is an artist."
    ~St. Francis of Assisi

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    27
    I'm a technician that work alone no boos its my small company and i live in Mexico and you know that the price of the work here is a little bit more than 10% of your price, .... But I still to buying the best tool that I can. Like JB PLATINUM 10 CFM or MILWAUKEE 18 volts HAMMER/DRILL/DRIVER XC 4.0 Nitrogen tanks and hose of 100 ft and a couple of appion VCTR or some pretty good handtools that are expensive but i think this...

    When you do a job everything's easy when you have the right tools and is more faster so an easy job that I will take you a 3 hours, with a good stuff it will be almost a hall of time and the money you will get for it, it's gonna be more rewarding that if you will made it in the double of time and of course more easier and much more quality job

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    324
    I started a new installer a couple days ago and I can see that I take my tool compliment entirely for granted.....lol. This cat was havin some issues doing seemingly simple tasks because he didnt have the tool or tools that would have made it easy peezy.

    I am of the frame of mind that if I am doing a job and I find that there is a tool or tools that can cut the time down or or turn a BS job into a cakewalk I'll buy it. I like to work smart, not hard.........
    l8r

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