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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    999

    Difference of Low NOx furnace vs. standard unit

    Among my quotes, I noticed that one was for a low NOx unit. Living in NJ, I wasn't aware of any requirements for them.

    Was wondering what if any downside there might be in using one vs. a standard furnace. Are there more stringent maintenance requirements or are they any more prone to failure and more likely to need repairs?

    I remember when automobile pollution controls were first implemented, cars became less fuel efficient (mpg) and seemed to suffer (pickup). Any corollation there?

    AM

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    33,897
    Usually it just some crap they stuff in the entrance to the heat exchanger where the fire shoots in. They get all crudded up and burned up and we have to remove them. Rare to see them around here unless a furnace meant for California gets lost! Not sure what all states require it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    999
    Quote Originally Posted by BaldLoonie View Post
    Usually it just some crap they stuff in the entrance to the heat exchanger where the fire shoots in. They get all crudded up and burned up and we have to remove them. Rare to see them around here unless a furnace meant for California gets lost! Not sure what all states require it.
    Thanks, Baldone. After I read your post, I did a little searching and found an article about these units.

    The jist of the article was that it was necessary to reduce flame temperature in order to lower production of NOx.

    One method was to 'insert' a rod into the flame to conduct heat away (sounds like what you ran up against). The other was to recirculate some of the flue gas back into the combustion area (are they still using exhaust gas recirculation for cars, these days?).

    Either way, it (lower flame temp) suggests that you would be paying a penalty (lost BTUs). I could be wrong, but the info I found only named California as requiring these units. Hmmm, I wonder why a NJ firm would be selling these.

    AM

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    What I find amusing about the "low NOx" furnaces is that the ones I have worked on produced more than twice as much CO in the flue gasses with the screen/rod/coil in place than without it.

    Just like with oxygenated gasoline, they go after a reduction in one target pollutant, at the expense of creating more of other undesirable emissions.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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