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  1. #1

    Heat pump auxillairy heat strips

    Great forum! I have noticed when the outside temp drops below 34 deg, the aux heat strips come on when the heat pump comes on. They stay on for the entire running time. Is this normal? Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Round Rock
    Posts
    3,559
    They shouldn't come on until the unit can no longer keep up or it is in defrost.

  3. #3

    heat strips

    Thank you for your reply. I'll have a tech come out.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,903
    There's probably nothing wrong.

    - The system could be going into defrost without you knowing it.

    - Depending on how it's set up, there could be an outdoor temperature sensor which brings on the aux heat at a preset balance point

    - The thermostat might be very sensitive (high aux heat CPH setting) and call for aux heat before the temperature drops more than 1 degree below the setpoint.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    S.W. PA
    Posts
    3,298
    if ita always at 34 then thats probably right
    its probably set there because at that point heat pump wont keep up with it anyway
    always good to have units checked out yearly anyway but i dont think you have a problem. but i am not there to see it so take it for what its worth

    and please post back what the finding were

  6. #6

    heat strips

    Thank you all for your replys. I will double check the temp at which the strips are activated and if I have a tech come out I will notify you of the results. May you all have a wonderful Christmas.

  7. #7

    tech contacted

    I contacted a tech recommended by several of my friends re the heat strip activation. He came out and indicated that the heat strips would come on automatically at 34 deg or lower and stay on until the system shut down and that nothing was wrong. He suggested that I not change any settings. However, an acquaintance of mine said that the heat strips on his unit don't come on near as often as mine, even when the temp is below 32 deg. I don't have the manual for my heat pump. It is a Frigidaire 2001, high efficiency model. I don't have any specs for it. I'm beginning to think I should have the settings adjusted to lock out the aux until the outside temp reaches 25 deg. Any ideas on this? Thanks

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Derby City
    Posts
    3,964
    Yes. Listen to the tech and not your 'friends.'
    Everyone has a purpose in life..........even if it's to be a bad example.

    Seek first to understand, before seeking to be understood.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    I do not have the capability of locking out the aux heating strips or having them come on at a certain temp. I guess I don't have the Pro thermostat.

    My Honeywell 7500 stat will cycle the aux heat on and off if the heat pump can't keep up. I like that it cycles as it's cheaper that way.

    I think it's a good idea for you to figure out what your balance point is by locking out the aux at a lower temperature. I would do this gradually and see how it goes. From 34, I would go to 32. If that's OK, then go to 30. I wouldn't jump right from 34 to 25 degrees. The ability of the heat pump to keep up in cold temps depends on several factors including outdoor temp, heat pump size, btu output rating, ductwork, home construction, insulation, etc.

    Best to you.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    11,347

    *

    you may be wasting a (bunch) of electricity, my heat strips are locked out until it reaches 15 degrees outside!



    .

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Kingston Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,211
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmechanical View Post
    you may be wasting a (bunch) of electricity, my heat strips are locked out until it reaches 15 degrees outside!



    .
    I agree with your thinking, Airmechanical! Every person and every house is different. If a HO has a heat pump, I believe they should lock out their aux strips (not duel fuel) as low as possible and see exactly what there heat pump will do. Then adjust the aux accordingly. It only makes sense to use the heat pump this way.

    thorton
    __________________
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  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    1,032
    Quote Originally Posted by beachbum64 View Post
    I contacted a tech recommended by several of my friends re the heat strip activation. He came out and indicated that the heat strips would come on automatically at 34 deg or lower and stay on until the system shut down and that nothing was wrong. He suggested that I not change any settings. However, an acquaintance of mine said that the heat strips on his unit don't come on near as often as mine, even when the temp is below 32 deg. I don't have the manual for my heat pump. It is a Frigidaire 2001, high efficiency model. I don't have any specs for it. I'm beginning to think I should have the settings adjusted to lock out the aux until the outside temp reaches 25 deg. Any ideas on this? Thanks
    below 35 degrees or so the heatpump will lose more and more of its efficiency.
    While it cost more to run the Electric Heat, its still cheaper then to use electric heat strips then to keep the heatpump running and not doing any good

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    The Twilight Zone
    Posts
    2,964
    Quote Originally Posted by marter View Post
    below 35 degrees or so the heatpump will lose more and more of its efficiency.
    While it cost more to run the Electric Heat, its still cheaper then to use electric heat strips then to keep the heatpump running and not doing any good
    This statement is wrong. Electric resistance is never cheaper than a heat pump (except in arctic climates). The btus that the heat pump puts out drops as the temperature decreases, but so does the power consumption of the compressor.

    At 15F, my heat pump has a COP (Coefficient of Performance) of 2.46. This means that 2.46 kw of heat are produced for every 1 kw of electricity consumed. It is basically 246% efficient at 15F.

    Many people do not want their compressors running constantly because of wear and tear, but that's a different issue.

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