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  1. #1

    Rheem vs. York vs. RUUD

    Building a new 5,900 sq ft home. Trying to decide between Rheem, RUUD or York. Have three seperate quotes with Rheem and RUUD being pretty close, but York and Carrier being more expensive. Would you spend the additional $ on the York or carrier over the Rheem or Ruud. And if no, would you choose Rheem or RUUD. I thought Rheem made RUUD so I would assume Rheem is better than RUUD. Please respond.

    Rheem 16 seer 2 stage variable / 90% upflow furnace

    York 15.5 / 94% variable speed furnace

    RUUD 16 seer / 96% furnace

  2. #2
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    Do you have any model numbers? Did the contractors perform a load calculation to determine proper sizing? Which contractor(s) did you feel more comfortable with? A bit more information is needed to give a more accurate answer. Many here push the fact that properly sized systems make a huge difference. Your quotes look comparable from this standpoint, but we'd need to know the model numbers to see if the York or the Rheem is modulating, dual stage, or single stage. As far as brands go, you should not have trouble with any of those brands as long as it is installed and sized correctly. O don't see the Carrier information listed.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    If you are using the Rheem 16 SEER 2 stage ac, the furnace he will be using is the modulating 90. That's a caddilac system frankly and will out perform the other options on efficiency, reliability, warranty and just about any other comparison. The mod has a LIFETIME FURNACE REPLACEMENT WARRANTY, direct spark, fully modulating. Matched with that outdoor unit, you get a 10 year UNIT REPLACEMENT WARRANTY if the compressor fails.

    BTW, Rheem and Ruud are identical exept the first letter in the model number. Go with the contractor in this case that you trust more.

  4. #4
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    Rheem/Ruud are one in the same, come down same assembly line. I would definetly go with either of the above over York or Carrier. But as Ryan said a good installer can make a world of difference. So do not let the equipment or the price be the only deciding factors.
    <*}(((-< Good work is not cheap!
    >*}(((-< Cheap work is not good!

  5. #5

    Thumbs up

    The Rheem contractor that I have did the heat load calculations and came up with a 16 seer stage a/c, 90% modulating furnace downstairs in the main living area and the master bedroom (which is on the 1st floor) and 80% on the 2nd floor. 4 ton units & 120,000 btu on the main living area and upstairs and 2 Ton unit & 75,000 in the master suite. (FYI approximately 2,000 sqaure feet upstairs, 2,500 sqaure ft main living area and 1,500 master suite.)

    Seems like Rheem should be my pick based on your feedback. Any other info would be appreciated.

    Thank You

  6. #6
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    The Rheem dealer sure sounds like a winner to me. Can you ask the York contractor about a load calculation and about the modulating furnace? Good luck.

  7. #7
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    120k is a hell of a lot of heat for the 2500 sq ft main floor. That doesn't sound right to me.

    There are 2500 sq ft full houses in cold climates that have 70-80kbtu furnaces.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    120k is a hell of a lot of heat for the 2500 sq ft main floor. That doesn't sound right to me.

    There are 2500 sq ft full houses in cold climates that have 70-80kbtu furnaces.

    he said 2500 main living area + a 1500 sq foot master suite... thats 4000 square feet.

  9. #9
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    4 ton units & 120,000 btu on the main living area and upstairs and 2 Ton unit & 75,000 in the master suite.


    195,000 btu's total for both floors.

    Sounds like a slight over size.
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
    4 ton units & 120,000 btu on the main living area and upstairs and 2 Ton unit & 75,000 in the master suite.


    195,000 btu's total for both floors.

    Sounds like a slight over size.
    The main living area has 10 foot ceiling throughout with a few rooms having 12 ft raised and one room having 20 foot.

    2nd floor has 9 foot ceilings.

    Does that make any sense to you?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    120k is a hell of a lot of heat for the 2500 sq ft main floor. That doesn't sound right to me.

    There are 2500 sq ft full houses in cold climates that have 70-80kbtu furnaces.
    Correct. My 2500 sq ft house (Philadelphia area) ~ 60,000 BTU. Winter design temp = 14 degrees.

    AM

  12. #12
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    sorry

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by joe33bird View Post
    The main living area has 10 foot ceiling throughout with a few rooms having 12 ft raised and one room having 20 foot.

    2nd floor has 9 foot ceilings.

    Does that make any sense to you?
    Without a load calc can't know for sure. But even with 10' ceilings your probaly over sized close ot 30&#37; on the heat.
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