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Thread: Humidifier Math

  1. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    133
    If you look at the cube I'm Conditioning it's almost 6000 SqFt with 10 Ft ceilings. I said my 12 Gal a day bypass humidifier "almost" keeps up. So I don't think I'm quite as "leaky" as you might think.

    20 Years ago there was no such thing as
    "Airtite Cans".

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by frankt View Post
    20 Years ago there was no such thing as
    "Airtite Cans".
    Easy enough to fix.
    http://www.ccl-light.com/docs/indoor...atw/index.html
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    So. NH
    Posts
    766
    I have an Aprilair 600. It uses 0 water and costs 0 on my sewage bill.
    It has been turned off for over 2 years, 41% RH in my house right now.
    I fixed the air leakage.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    133
    Mark

    Have you purchased from CCL before? They seem to have a P### Poor reputation.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by frankt View Post
    Mark

    Have you purchased from CCL before? They seem to have a P### Poor reputation.
    Yes, we have purchased several cases of the air tight trims, and installed them in customers homes , no problems yet. Seems to be a good quality product.
    A few of our customers have purchased them on our recommendation, some people like to pay for the testing, then DIY some of the easy sealing work. No complaints about this product yet.

    They also have some that are $1.99 each that look ok and are actually easier to install, but I don't recommend them because they can't be removed without destroying the spring tabs that hold them in the fixture.

    There is a slightly nicer looking air tight trim replacement available from another source, but they are in the neighborhood of $15-$17 each, and are not enough nicer looking to warrant triple the cost.
    Last edited by mark beiser; 11-29-2007 at 01:29 AM.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    133
    There is a slightly nicer looking air tight trim replacement available from another source, but they are in the neighborhood of $15-$17 each, and are not enough nicer looking to warrant triple the cost.

    I assume your talking about Halo's air tite trims here.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    Ceiling Can Issues

    I don't know how old your ceiling can is but the funny thing about Ceiling Can is: We want lighting but we do NOT want to lose heat (it is contradictory)!

    - When the Celing light is on: heat loss is from the heat produced by the bulb itself and leakage of home HVAC air around the trim/can.
    - When the Celing light is off: heat loss is from leakage of home HVAC air around the trim/can.

    - IC (Insulated Ceiling) Cans are basically the same as Non-IC can but "double encapsulated", so basically 2 layers of metal to avoid excessive heat to the insulation (? fire hazard etc. although fiberglass is not combustible).

    - The IC Can allows insulation to come into contact with the Can itself without risk of overheat.

    http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/arti...212235,00.html
    Picture 2 shows you the IC can should have a little space around it.
    (Do this only for can in the second floor attic, for cans between 1st and 2nd floor, the heat is still in the enclosed bldg envelope so no heat loss here).

    My 2 cents:
    1. For IC cans on the second floor (above them is the attic). You migfht want to build a little "cave" around them and place insulation above it.
    2. Using aluminum tape (used for sealing HVAC duct), seal the holes in the cans. Use less wattage here 35-40W bulbs so less heat, less loss, but a bit less light output.
    3. Seal around the can and ceiling drywall.
    4. Use trim with rubber seal around the edges.

    5. Check your windows seals too. If imposssible to change the seal then use some kind of insulation kit (looks like saran wrap and seal the windows in the winter)

    This is the same others have said: tighten up your home.

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