Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 52
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Charm City--the city that bleeds
    Posts
    2,790

    what you can do to end "global warming"

    I will post this article, and say this: The solution to this problem is just like our solution to politics. Without expecting national solutions at every turn, (you) get involved locally. Or as Voltaire said in closing Candide, " Yes, but we must tend our garden."


    And my question to you is...Has this "global warming" hysteria been generated by folks whose life structure, as the author of this article put it in paragraph 4, gotten them to thinking that way?
    In the Garden
    by Scott P. Richert

    “How’s your garden doing this year?” It’s a familiar question, as normal as the greeting that began the conversation and the goodbye that will end it. I cannot start a conversation with my grandmother, or an aunt or uncle or cousin, without being asked the question within a minute or two—or, depending on the time of year, one of the related questions: “So, are you going to put out a garden this year?” and “How did your garden do?”

    To the outside observer, the question might seem like idle chit-chat, the kind of thing you say when you don’t know what else to talk about—like asking about the weather. But listen a little longer, and you realize that there’s more to it; the question is only the beginning of the conversation, because they each have gardens, too. How many tomato plants did you put out? What varieties of peppers? The melons are doing well, but the squash failed early in the season. It’s been a great year for okra. You grow everything in raised beds, don’t you?

    We talk about the weather, too, because it tells us something about the state of our gardens. We’ve had too much rain; they haven’t had enough. The hot, dry weather, ironically, has made for the best watermelons in years, because they grow like wildfire and send down amazing taproots. The last frost was early, and it looks like the first frost will be late; this may be the longest growing season in years. Some of our fruit trees bloomed too early, however, because we had a stretch of warm weather before that last frost, so we’ll have no plums or mountain ash berries this year.

    We never talk, though, about “the environment” or “global warming” or “greenhouse gases” or “carbon emissions.” More often than not, the people who chatter on endlessly about such things would have to answer “How’s your garden doing this year?” with “I don’t have a garden.” Too busy worrying about “the environment” while spending most of their day engaged in activities that increase carbon emissions and greenhouse gases, they do not have any time left to spend with, and in, nature. They have never consciously reduced nature to the abstraction of “the environment”; the very structure of their lives has done it for them.

    When I was younger, talking about our gardens was a common activity among most of the people I knew. Now, I rarely hold such conversations with anyone other than family or coworkers. Partly, that’s because I grew up in a small village along a river that flowed through some of the best farmland in the Midwest. Our yards were large; our soil, fertile; and families had plenty of children to send out to weed and water and harvest.

    Now, though, I live in a mid-sized city, which surrounds a river that flows through some of the best farmland in the Midwest. City folk today are less likely to plant a garden (at least a vegetable garden), but you can still see, especially in certain older neighborhoods, where gardens and home orchards used to be. Raised beds and terraced sections of back yards are covered with grass. Apple trees, beechnuts, mulberries, edible crab apples go unharvested except by birds and bugs and squirrels, while the homeowners purchase unripe pears from California and Chile, hazelnuts imported from Turkey, and gigantic but tasteless Mexican-grown raspberries at $3.99 a pint.

    There’s an inverse relationship between the rising cost of industrially raised fruit and vegetables and their declining flavor and quality. You simply cannot ship a ripe tomato to Rockford from Mexico or California, so they are picked green and artificially ripened in the trucks on the way here. (Any that ripen on the vine are sold to canners for tomato juice or paste or sauce.) For the dubious pleasure of eating a bland and often mealy tomato, we pay for the cost of transportation and of the ripening agent. As late as a decade or two ago, most people purchased such produce only in the winter, because even chain supermarkets bought what fruit and vegetables they could locally during the growing season. Now, you can’t find a naturally ripened tomato or peach in a Rockford supermarket in August. In part, that’s because there’s less and less locally grown produce for stores to buy; but sadly, it’s also often a conscious decision based on corporate logistics and supply lines, as well as a desire to provide “consumers” with a consistent “product” throughout the year—even if it’s consistently bad.

    When the “fresh” produce that’s available is so unappealing, is it any wonder that people turn to processed foods that at least have flavor, however artificial and unattractive that flavor might be to anyone with even a slightly refined palate? But processed foods, of course, require more energy and more chemicals and travel farther between field and plate than even raw industrial produce does.

    In the end, it all takes its toll—on “the environment,” on our culture, our neighborhoods, our families, our health. Congress and the United Nations spend time and resources debating the causes of global warming and environmental degradation and negotiating treaties and laws to set standards and goals and restrictions, and taxpayers pay—both monetarily and in loss of freedom—to implement it all. Of course, we also pay taxes to support federally subsidized industrial agriculture and state and local tax breaks for the national chains that contribute so much to the very phenomena that Congress and the United Nations wish to eradicate.

    How much, I wonder, could carbon emissions and greenhouse gases be reduced if all those who could devoted a little corner of their yard to a garden, and bought other produce at their local farmers’ market or through a CSA (community-supported agriculture) or coop, and patronized, when possible, those locally owned grocery stores that still try to purchase produce nearby? What if people lived the way that people used to live, instead of neglecting their own responsibilities and clamoring for legislation to deal with the consequences?

    One thing is certain: Children would grow up once again knowing what a tomato really tastes like. And they would have something to talk about the next time their grandmother calls.

    Scott P. Richert is the executive editor of Chronicles.

    And if you like this article or want to see its origin, check out

    http://www.chroniclesmagazine.org/

    Enjoy!
    The Doctor
    It's great to be alive and pumping oxygen!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    forney texas
    Posts
    17,890
    we could all pray for one or two major volcanic eruptions, which would stop global warming for the foreseeable future.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    971
    Kill all the Lawyers first then do in cows.


    Expect nothing, yet expect the unexpected.
    Press on Regardless, Endeavor to Persevere.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Dacula, GA
    Posts
    12,637
    If you really believe that man is responsible for global warming then lock up Owl Gore and reduce that gigantic carbon footprint of his.
    "I could have ended the war in a month. I could have made North Vietnam look like a mud puddle."
    "I have little interest in streamlining government or in making it more efficient, for I mean to reduce its size. I do not undertake to promote welfare, for I propose to extend freedom. My aim is not to pass laws, but to repeal them. It is not to inaugurate new programs, but to cancel old ones that do violence to the Constitution."
    Barry Goldwater

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Here and there
    Posts
    4,805
    I have seen no credible science that backs up any claim there even IS global warming. Log earth first we'll get to the other planets later. If you want the price of gas down why not push for Anwar drilling and new refineries . The whole issue reeks of bs.
    i belong to peta ... people eating tasty animals. all my opinions are just mine.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Quote Originally Posted by jpb2 View Post
    I have seen no credible science that backs up any claim there even IS global warming. Log earth first we'll get to the other planets later. If you want the price of gas down why not push for Anwar drilling and new refineries . The whole issue reeks of bs.
    Ooooo! MAJOR bingo here. MAJOR I say!
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, N.C.
    Posts
    964
    I put in those fluorescent light bulbs, but they burnt down my house, which triggered a wildfire and melted my refrigerant lines and released the charge. Thereby increasing global warming. Darn-it. Oh well I tried.


    The ice caps melting could be good do you think the ocean will come in this far? I could be sitting on a gold mine worth of ocean front property.
    Those who restrain desire do so because theirs is weak enough to be restrained. (William Blake)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    Who's responsible for polar caps melting on other planets?


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, N.C.
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel Murdough View Post
    Good info but all those BIG words gave me a headache. I'm going to lay down.
    Those who restrain desire do so because theirs is weak enough to be restrained. (William Blake)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Near Atlanta, GA.
    Posts
    14,540
    melted my refrigerant lines and released the charge. Thereby increasing global warming
    No, that causes ozone depletion. Eating Taco Bell and the resulting farts contribute to global warming.

    Maybe we should ban Taco Bell.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, N.C.
    Posts
    964
    Only if you light them!
    Those who restrain desire do so because theirs is weak enough to be restrained. (William Blake)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Near Atlanta, GA.
    Posts
    14,540
    Quote Originally Posted by trey r View Post
    Only if you light them!
    That's the fun part.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    SC
    Posts
    20,677
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel Murdough View Post
    Robo's aliens. You know,,,the ones that brought us here.

    Apparently, they haven't learned a damn thing.
    No reserve. No retreat. No regrets.

    For those who have fought for it, freedom has a sweetness the protected will never know.

    http://www.airwarvietnam.com/16thSOSGunners2.jpg

    Proud member of KA Club

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event