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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14

    fan powered or bypass humidifier?

    I will be getting a new high (95) efficiency furnace with a whole house humidifier, either Trane or Carrier, and would like to know the pros and cons of these two types of humidifiers - bypass and fan powered, both automatic. I don't mind paying a little more money upfront if I will be happier later on, and maybe also see some savings. We have a small (1500sq ft) house, and noise is also an issue, as the furnace will be in a small closet in the kitchen. We have our own well, but no shortage of water yet.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    1,234
    Either one will work well but if you only have a small area there may not be enough space to install the ducting for a by-pass. Need to verify that first.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14
    I guess I don't understand how a by-pass works. Why would it need extra ducting? and from what to what?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    South
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by mtamara View Post
    I guess I don't understand how a by-pass works. Why would it need extra ducting? and from what to what?
    There are two basic humidifier types: bypass and power fan. Each simply uses a different method to move air through them. Power fan humidifiers use a 110 volt fan to move air through them. Bypass humidifiers do not have a fan, but instead require a 6" duct to be connected to the side and then to the opposite air duct system from the humidifier. That means for bypass models that if the humidifier is installed on the supply plenum, the 6" duct will connect to the humidifier and the return plenum, and if the humidifier is installed on the return plenum, the 6" duct will attach to humidifier and the supply plenum.

    Both humidifier types bypass and power fan will provide the same benefits to you. The only difference is the technology used to do so. The advantage to power fan models is since they do not require additional ductwork, they can be installed faster and in tighter spaces. The advantage to bypass models is that they cost a bit less.
    What's another word for Thesaurus?
    - Steven Wright

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    103
    Why not consider the new honeywell steam system?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14
    It's not available yet, according to other posts. Why would it be worth waiting for? My contractor said that steam humidifiers have problems - could you explain to me how the new Honeywell will avoid those problems? THANKS.

    Also, my heating ducts are in an unheated crawl space (the ducts heat the crawl space and keep the pipes from freezing). Would than cause condensation in the cold ducts?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    1,234
    Quote Originally Posted by mtamara View Post
    It's not available yet, according to other posts. Why would it be worth waiting for? My contractor said that steam humidifiers have problems - could you explain to me how the new Honeywell will avoid those problems? THANKS.

    Also, my heating ducts are in an unheated crawl space (the ducts heat the crawl space and keep the pipes from freezing). Would than cause condensation in the cold ducts?
    There have been a few issues with steam humidifiers but the new Honeywell steam hum. can be mounted remotely and piped ( with special tubing up tp 20 feet) into the ductwork. Question: if your ducts heat the crawl space how can it be unheated?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14
    There are no vents in the crawl space, so it is the warmth radiating from the ducts that warms it. And I keep three small crawl space windows (16X4) open until I can test for radon, which is a concern in our area. So the crawl space is considerably cooler than the house. Is this something I should take care of?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    1,234
    If the crawl space is warmed by the heat from the ducts then you are losing that available heat you would like to utilize in the house. I'd look into insulating the ducts, which should have been done during installation.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    2,680
    not sure where you are at, but some local health services (state/county) used to have test strip type units available to check your radon levels, our company is not certified for Radon testing,ect. but a couple other guys here are and they set up a meter of some sort in your home, then if levels warrant a removal system they install piping w/ a inline fan and vent to above your roofline. Radon is everywhere, just depends on whether it has a way to seep into your home, with a dirt crawlspace it is a very good chance you may have high enough levels. I'm sure there is enough reasons out there to cause concerns, but I figure, trident causes cancer in lab rats too so what the heck ya going to do, if one thing don't get ya, something else will!

    Just found MN website for test kits, guess they are about $6 for the short test version
    http://mn.radon.com/
    Last edited by cmajerus; 11-21-2007 at 08:15 PM.
    You can't fix stupid

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