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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    68

    Will Direct Venting cut down dust?

    Currently I have a 80% oil furnace and I'm upgrading to a 94% Bryant Plus 90I
    The furnace is located in the laundry room with a gas dryer and 2 dogs. My air filter that I currently have just slides in and doesn't have any door. So I tape it shut. Being that oil furnace gets the combustion air from the inside, I have a feeling it's pulling in dog dander and dryer lint, regardless if I bath the dogs and don't see visible lint in the dryer room.

    Will the new furnace cut down on the dust if it's pulling air from the outside and not the dogs room. I do realize it's also receiving air from the returns and it's going to circulate the dust we have already and create our selfs.

    Will I see a difference moving from the pleated (600 Rated) 3M special to the thicker MERV 8 or 10 filter?

    Thanks!

    Twisterbret

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    68
    I've run a couple searches in Google and overall it seems like it would cut down on the dust. What is your professorial opinion?
    Thanks!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    in my lumpy chair
    Posts
    1,947
    i would only be concerned about keeping out the lint and the dog dander out of my burners, and keep the efficiency rating as high as i could by drawing out side air for combustion instead of drawing it from the conditioned space
    I dont warranty Tinkeritus

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    It is a good thing any time you can go from pulling combustion air from inside the conditioned space to pulling it from outside.

    Whether or not it would reduce the amount of dust in the house depends on if any of the dust is being brought in by the increased infiltration caused by air being pulled out of the house for combustion air when the heat is running.

    IMO, the health and safety concerns of having a non sealed combustion furnace in the same room with a cloths drier(dumb idea to begin with), and the energy savings from not having to heat the outside air that infiltrates in to replace the air that goes up the vent pipe, are more compelling reasons to switch to a sealed combustion furnace.

    Switching to a more efficient filter is unlikely to make any direct impact whatsoever on the dust levels in the house, unless a major source of the dust is return leakage before the filter.
    It could indirectly reduce dust if you have significant supply duct leakage to outside the conditioned space of the home. The more efficient filter would likely reduce the airflow through the system, which would reduce the amount of air leaking out of the house, which reduces the amount of dirty air that infiltrates into the house.
    Best to fix the problem IMO.

    I recommend you have the house tested.
    Comfort Institute member contractors all have the equipment, and should have the training needed, to test your house for leakage, and find the sources of the leakage.
    www.comfortinstitute.org
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    If it's in the laundry room, it would be a disservice to install a single pipe vent system on anything.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    Quote Originally Posted by docholiday View Post
    If it's in the laundry room, it would be a disservice to install a single pipe vent system on anything.
    It should be against the law, not uncommon to find that though. In my area, I often see a water heater in the same space with the washer and drier.
    Last edited by mark beiser; 11-17-2007 at 06:11 AM.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    It should be against the law, not uncommon to find that though. In my, I often see a water heater in the same space with the washer and drier.
    Is the main problem CO or lint clogging up the nozzles or having enough air for combustion? The laundry room door is a full louver type. When the furnace is on you can a stick paper on the door. I do agree I'm sure it's pulling in air from outside from the front door, which is just up a half a flight of stairs.
    The original dryer was electric. The fire inspection was signed off. He was concerned that I have a CO detector in that room and somewhere else, which I do. My concern was if the dryer doesn't fire up and the oil furnace kicks on (boom) dust problems gone.

    Hopefully any concerns will be resolved, we picked a direct vent 2 pipe Bryant 90I.

    Thanks!

    Twisterbret

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    7,680
    That and chemicals commonly found and used in the laundry room. It may be unoticable to the occupant, but rest assured, those chemicals in the combustion process can create corrosive flue gasses and condensation that can eat away your HX.

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