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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Carroll County, Maryland
    Posts
    8

    Question about standard practices

    I just had 2 heat pumps with all associated ductwork added to my >100 year old house, and I have a couple of questions about "standard practices" that they followed.

    1) On the second floor most of my ducts were run to ceiling vents, which were run through plaster and a 1 by spacer and paper tile. This would not seem to be a problem, but while they were installing it they sandwiched the lath boards plaster the spacer and the paper tile between the damper and the diffuser. I have a picture of what the hole looks like which I will add to this post. I did not like this as air would blow into my attic and blow plaster dust into the room. When I questioned them they stated it was standard practice. Is this standard practice?

    2) They did the same thing where I had a drywall ceiling, and stated on new construction they attached the metal adapter to the flex to the joists and then after drywall was complete the diffusers would screw over top. This does not seem like a good idea to me for two reasons, one is drywall dust will be blown into the room and there is potential for air leaking behind the drywall. Is this standard practice?

    3) The first floor air handler was put on the second floor and converted to the flow downward. They only applied foam tape to the air handler and sat it on the floor. When I questioned them they added some silicone and a single duct strap to hold it to the floor. Is this standard practice? What can I do to improve this?

    4) Is it important to have the air handler and the heat pump level?

    5) Should all seams be taped? In the attic a lot of the elbow to damper connection were not taped and it seems to me they should be.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    1,251

    Just because it's standard doesn't make it right.

    One of my pet peeves is to have someone tell me "That's the way we've always done it, and we've never had a problem." That doesn't mean that it's right, just that they were never forced to go back and fix it. There are a lot of contractors that will never come back to fix their mistakes.
    I would have to say that most of the installs I see are done as you have described your job. That said, I feel you're right to be concerned about the air leaks. Try to get them back out to test for air leaks.
    "You do not merely want to be considered just the best of the best. You want to be considered the only ones who do what you do.".... Jerry Garcia
    "You just have to decide if you're a Tigger or an Eeyore,..I think you know where I stand on the great Tigger/Eeyore debate." Prof. Randy Pausch

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,371
    So if I understand this situation correctly, there is no actual ductwork for the system, just spacers and plasterboard in the ceiling? I'm not sure if I like that idea, but I'm not a pro.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Carroll County, Maryland
    Posts
    8

    solution that I came up with

    Yes there is duct work, although it is of the flex variety. I came up with a solution for my first 2 questions and fixed the problem the evening they finished the rough in. I went out and cut up some chunks of 1/2" plywood and took out the dampers, cut the holes larger and put them below the paper tile while I had my father-in-law in the attic holding the plywood above each screw to clamp the dampers up. So now the flow goes directly into the room. I would have thought a metal ring would be made for this application.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,172
    No boots?
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Quote Originally Posted by jordan11 View Post
    Yes there is duct work, although it is of the flex variety. I came up with a solution for my first 2 questions and fixed the problem the evening they finished the rough in. I went out and cut up some chunks of 1/2" plywood and took out the dampers, cut the holes larger and put them below the paper tile while I had my father-in-law in the attic holding the plywood above each screw to clamp the dampers up. So now the flow goes directly into the room. I would have thought a metal ring would be made for this application.
    They do make a metal ring for that aplication. It is what holds the damper. It should be installed from below, through the drywall or plaster.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Carroll County, Maryland
    Posts
    8

    metal ring on the damper

    Thanks for all the responses so far. I am not sure I made my request clear. When the metal ring on the damper is screwed from below into the drywall or plaster will not hold the weight of the damper. So I backed it up with pieces of wood on the top of the plaster and the metal ring of the damper on the bottom. I was asking if they make a second metal ring to accomplish this clamping.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,172
    Kevin ---

    Is this the missing piece that you mean?

    If so, it seems the OP has that piece. Guess his gap is too big or the ceiling can't handle the weight of the register.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Quote Originally Posted by jrbenny View Post
    Kevin ---

    Is this the missing piece that you mean?

    If so, it seems the OP has that piece. Guess his gap is too big or the ceiling can't handle the weight of the register.
    JR,

    Yeah, either that or the damper assembly, which includes that ring.

    Normally, a piece of round duct is fastened outside that ring with screws, then flex is fastened to the duct. They also make a round plaster flange with pipe included for on top of the drywall, then the damper is fastened to it from below. Then the register is screwed to the damper assembly.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,038
    First of all, a round diffuser is horrid for heat. The air hugs the ceiling. That's great for cooling as you get no drafts. But that is NOT the diffuser you put in for any type of heat. Should be something that points the heat DOWN!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,172
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin O'Neill View Post
    JR,

    Yeah, either that or the damper assembly, which includes that ring.

    Normally, a piece of round duct is fastened outside that ring with screws, then flex is fastened to the duct. They also make a round plaster flange with pipe included for on top of the drywall, then the damper is fastened to it from below. Then the register is screwed to the damper assembly.
    Sounds like he's missing the duct connector/round duct/boot and not the ring.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,069
    Take some more pictures.
    ___________________________

    Chicago is an indian word for stinky!!!!!!
    -supertek65

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,870
    Take pics of the connection in the attic.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

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