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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Westlake, Ohio
    Posts
    2,514
    Quote Originally Posted by agentphelps View Post
    This could have already been said but.. All home CO detectors have a service life of about 6 to 7 years, once activated before the sensor gives you a false positive or no reading at all. I toss all mine out at 5 years and buy new ones.

    There is no guarantee that a CO alarm is good for 5 years. But if one has a good low level CO Monitor that actually can protect everyone, they are easily tested with the smoke of a match at any time.
    captain CO

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    990
    I'm poisoned 5 days a week driving my co's 2007 van. I read at least an 8 ppm from sitting still at stop lights while they are red etc. Plus going into lingering CO saturated homes with CO producing heaters. We breath more CO in a given day than any firefighter working 3 fires a day. "They use self contained gas tank/mask systems", where is ours?

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by lotr13 View Post
    Hello,

    Forgive me if this is the wrong place to post this question, I'm just looking for a little guidance.

    A few months back (May or June I'd say) I bought a combination natural gas/carbon monoxide detector. At first the carbon monoxide peak level was zero, but then it jumped to 12 and has slowly risen until it now resides at 31. The current reading always says 0 whenever I take a glance at it, but the peak level is concerning me. I've reset it a couple of times to see if it was a faulty reading, but it goes back up within a few days.

    What really has me scratching my head is that we only have electrical appliances in the house. Nothing is running off gas except our heating, which does use natural gas. Even though the heat was not running the whole time the levels have been going up, I'm wondering if somehow that is the cause. If that's not it, what else should I be looking at?

    Any help or direction would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Matt
    On the kiddie alarms the peak level is a average PPM reading. Some days it could pick up 3ppm. The next day it will read 6ppm and keeps adding to it. I've had mine at 212ppm in my garage for a average over several months. It's not a big deal because if you divide the days it's a low amount of monoxide. The kiddie monitors levels every minute and will display if there is over 30ppm present. Over 31ppm the alarm will go off, this is osha standard and no more than 8 hours at this level. Once the alarm goes off on the kiddie the readings are instant. Best thing to do is open the windows and get some fans to push fresh air into the home. Then call the fire department so they can test the source. If it's reading zero then you're fine, make sure you have a monoxide detector in every room of the house.

    Also I want to hint more on co because many people think it is this horrible thing if you're exposed then you're infected. Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin stronger than oxygen binds hemoglobin. Consequently, there is a massive decrease in oxygen availability in your body and organs that need oxygen start lacking it. Thus why people get headaches. The brain needs air in the blood stream to function 100%, if your body isn't getting oxygen then things will start to shut down. If you were at high levels of CO the best thing for you is air. Going to a hospital they'll give you oxygen until you feel better. Seriously high levels of CO are a issue (thousands) and could cause brain damage or worse. What is serious levels? Putting a generator inside your house and running it all night long is seriously high levels. The best way to treat CO is to breath fresh air in, this will un-bond co from the hemoglobin and remove from your body on the next exhale.

    30 is pretty normal for the average cook, although this is a warning level because something is making the CO and in average joe tech mind could be unsafe. If something is generating carbon monoxide at this level then whose to say it will break more and within seconds jump to 1200ppm. 30 is a average number if someone was cooking all day on a natural gas cook top. If this is being made on it's own then the problem puts a person in danger as it could increase more quickly than expected.
    Last edited by Bannerd; 12-28-2009 at 11:31 PM.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Pluto
    Posts
    983
    Quote Originally Posted by Bannerd View Post
    On the kiddie alarms the peak level is a average PPM reading. Some days it could pick up 3ppm. The next day it will read 6ppm and keeps adding to it. I've had mine at 212ppm in my garage for a average over several months. It's not a big deal because if you divide the days it's a low amount of monoxide. The kiddie monitors levels every minute and will display if there is over 30ppm present. Over 31ppm the alarm will go off, this is osha standard and no more than 8 hours at this level. Once the alarm goes off on the kiddie the readings are instant. Best thing to do is open the windows and get some fans to push fresh air into the home. Then call the fire department so they can test the source. If it's reading zero then you're fine, make sure you have a monoxide detector in every room of the house.

    Also I want to hint more on co because many people think it is this horrible thing if you're exposed then you're infected. Carbon monoxide binds to hemoglobin stronger than oxygen binds hemoglobin. Consequently, there is a massive decrease in oxygen availability in your body and organs that need oxygen start lacking it. Thus why people get headaches. The brain needs air in the blood stream to function 100%, if your body isn't getting oxygen then things will start to shut down. If you were at high levels of CO the best thing for you is air. Going to a hospital they'll give you oxygen until you feel better. Seriously high levels of CO are a issue (thousands) and could cause brain damage or worse. What is serious levels? Putting a generator inside your house and running it all night long is seriously high levels. The best way to treat CO is to breath fresh air in, this will un-bond co from the hemoglobin and remove from your body on the next exhale.

    30 is pretty normal for the average cook, although this is a warning level because something is making the CO and in average joe tech mind could be unsafe. If something is generating carbon monoxide at this level then whose to say it will break more and within seconds jump to 1200ppm. 30 is a average number if someone was cooking all day on a natural gas cook top. If this is being made on it's own then the problem puts a person in danger as it could increase more quickly than expected.
    You got problems with carbon monoxide yourself after reinstalling a furnace with a bad heat exchanger after the new furnace you purchased on-line broke after a week in service.
    Not as lean, not as mean, but I'm still a hardcore, ass-kicking, hard charging Marine! Oohrah!

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    cincinnati ohio
    Posts
    2,024

    co detectors

    Heres a link for a good co detector ...http://www.clovercool.com/co_monitor.html
    My avatar is a picture of a Goodman Silencer .....These were commonly used in Goodman country ....Photos by hvac tech ( PaysonHVAC )

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