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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    906

    drain timer for drum humidifier?

    I'm in New England, & have forced-hot-air furnace. I have a drum humidifier and hard water. So I have to use tablets every month and replace the pad twice a season. A pain. Not interested in a water softener (it would substitute, rather than eliminate the minerals).

    Today I discovered a "drain timer". That would drain the humidifier twice a day.
    It's from skuttle (same manufacturer as humidifier). I'm guesstimating that the pan holds a quart of water. (probably less). So that means it would cost me an additional 15 gal/month, which is trivial.

    One concern - it would have to drain into my furnace H20 pump, not sure it would over tax the pump (i.e., too much water pouring into it at once).

    Otherwise - Why isn't this an excellent idea?
    /j

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    906
    if anyone's interested - the tech at the place that sells the drain timer said that you really have to let it run every 2 hours (my old data was out of date, the newer units run every 2 hours, not every 12) otherwise most of the minerals stay in the pan. Pumping a quart of water into my crawlspace every 2 hours is probably a bad idea, and it's also a lot more water 8-}.

    sigh - back to ordering more pads...
    /j

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,905
    Do away with the drum humidifier.

    The RH of outdoor air when heated drops dramatically (dewpoint stay the same, moisture capacity goes up); the less infiltration you have, the more moist your indoor air will be. A desirable humidity level can be maintained without the use of a humidifier via draft proofing.

    As a last resort, a flow-through model can be installed with a condensate pump if there is no floor drain. (I think)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    906
    well, you're entitled to your opinion 8-}. -my- house gets very dry in the cold winter, and I have sinus issues. Much more comfortable when humidifier running. No drainage for a continuous flow (and they seem wasteful anyway).
    thanks though 8-}

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    2,597
    I wouldn't pump water outside during freezing temps unless you do not mind an ice skating rink there. Water in tubing can freeze as well, causing the pump to back up in your home if the safety is not wired in.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Howell, Michigan
    Posts
    16,180
    It won't over tax your condensate pump.











    Best humidifier on the planet

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
    Posts
    2,905
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw_00 View Post
    well, you're entitled to your opinion 8-}. -my- house gets very dry in the cold winter, and I have sinus issues. Much more comfortable when humidifier running. No drainage for a continuous flow (and they seem wasteful anyway).
    thanks though 8-}
    Any house will get very dry in the winter if excessive infiltration is an issue. If the relative humidity is consistently below 30%, there's a problem. The humidifier is just a patch, not a satisfactory solution.

    I used to have a drum humidifier; they're nasty, a pain in the ass to maintain and tend to leak. (it's a matter of when, not if with these pieces of ****)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,366
    If you don't mind spending some money.

    An EWC Auto Flo steam humidifier might work better then hte one you have.
    Ok, it will work better.

    Auto purges itself about once every 12 hours. Can add moisture to your house weather or not the stat is calling for heat.

    They are expensive, but they work.





    PS: We have flo throughs piped to condensate pumps, so your drum humidifier won't over load your condensate pump.
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