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  1. #1

    Angled head Diagonal Cutters (Dykes)??

    I'll be starting a new job in 2 weeks. Just getting into the trade... Just would like your guys help...

    Should I get the angled head dykes or just go with the normal ones.. What one would be better too use and more useful?

    Also, I have just picked myself up a 7 piece set of Magnetic Hallow Shaft nut drivers 6''. Will I be fine with just thos or should i pick up the most common sizes (1/4, 5/16, 3/8) in the 3''. What about stubbys??? Thanks alot for your guys help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Rapid City, SD
    Posts
    7,415
    You'll never have enough tools!

    I'd get a 1/4 and 5/16, straight and phillips stubby too. Throw in a 10-in-1 screw driver too.. those things are handy as heck!

    I've only had the straight dykes (wow, that sounds bad), and they worked. But, the dykes I have now have like a 10 deg angle or something to them, and I actually like them better.
    "If you call that hard work, a koala’s life would look heroic."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Stubbies and long magnetic 1/4" and 5/16" also IMO. The magnetic drivers are a life saver sometimes when your trying to get some of those screw in.

  4. #4
    should the stubbies also be magnetic? or is there even a point with them already being stubbies.... what what do you mean long 1/4 & 5/16... I have the 6" ones should i also get the 18" ones... i think they are 18 not sure..

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Yeah a nice long set...15" 18" what ever the size. It's useful to have something that you can get to screws a little farther out then with 6". You have to be able to put them back most of the time so it just makes it easier.

  6. #6
    Like BigJon was a saying extention magnetic nut drivers but think Klein tools.
    Got tired of taking back stuff to Sears, busted the Vaco's the rubber grips on the Klein's while putting panels on in the rain or snow then you'll know why.
    FEN

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,801
    Quote Originally Posted by FenixHeat613TKO View Post
    Should I get the angled head dykes or just go with the normal ones.. What one would be better too use and more useful?
    Yes.
    ___________________________________________


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,801
    Quote Originally Posted by FenixHeat613TKO View Post
    should the stubbies also be magnetic? or is there even a point with them already being stubbies.... what what do you mean long 1/4 & 5/16... I have the 6" ones should i also get the 18" ones... i think they are 18 not sure..
    You are thinking about this too much...... You will soon see exactly what you need. You won't be prepared, I don't care how much you buy.
    ___________________________________________


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    S.E. Pa
    Posts
    6,305

    Cool

    Build a war chest as you will be buying tools for the rest of your life. That's why we all got into technical stuff---because we like fixin' things. Fixin' things requires tools and there is always another tool that would have helped on every job. It's an obcessive/ compulsive disorder thing. Anyone who tells you he fixes things and does not have a ridiculous tool collection is lying to you or himself.

    The single best advice I can give you has been echoed on this site a thousand times for newbies: buy only good tools. Resist the temptation to run down to Harbor Freight or online cheapo tool sites. While many guys have done well buying tools and instruments online, nothing beats holding it in your own hands to see how it feels and how the action is.

    FYI, most electricians I know use the offset dikes over most other types of wire strippers. A flick of the wrist to strip wires.

    Tools are like the stock market--an investment.

    Before buying electronic gizmos, do your research. Start a file on your computer where you can download all the online propaganda, spec sheets and manuals. Talk to a few mfrs. technical depts. about what capabilities your meters and such will need. I need DC millivolts and microamperes for flame rectification but don't need Hz or microfarads. Fluke has a great DVD on meters and electrical testing. I'll never buy another meter less than CAT III. As for gauges, know what equipment you'll be working on then ask around before buying multiple electronic gizmos if you'll only need a basic set for one particular flavor refer gas. Do the same homework on torches. Do you buy oxy/acetylene only or also get a B tank and Turbo torch set? Well, what will you be doing? That will also impact what tips you get. Get a good combustion analyzer, take the training and use it on every call. Keep a record of the calibration for all your meters and instruments. This is cost of business you can write off the same as uniform laundry and training.

    HTH,
    Hearthman

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    259
    You will want to get the angled head dykes. I would recommend the klein d2000-48 or the J2000-48. They are the blue handled dykes, and are hardened so that you can cut nails, screws, other metals, where as the red handled dykes are only ment for cutting wire. I have the J2000-48 and it is the last pair that I will ever need to buy (unless I lose mine, or they get stolen, or I need a new pair) Like these other guys said, we collect tools. Every time I go to the parts house I buy something to add to the collection

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    820
    I have the 1/4 and 5/16 stubbys, those have made my life easier working on alot of small refer stuff, the only thing i wish is that they were magnetic, i bought the klein, does anyone know if i can get those magnetic.

    I have the straight dikes, i have never came across something where i wish i had the agled dikes. I also dont go for the pricy ones, most will cut whatever you need.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Dallas TX
    Posts
    192

    single stubby

    I bought one stubby screw driver with two bits in one. It has a standard 1/4 hex drive so my magnetic bits for the drill fit as well as my bits from my full size 10 in one. means less stuff to drag into an attic.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    58
    I did the same. I keep it in my pocket. It has a hollow spot with basic bits (I thew away the OEM ones and use my dewalt set). Also in my pocket are a 3.6v screwdriver, 2 extentions (3" and 4") my 1/4 and 5/16 bits. Covers most of what I need without headache.

    Tip: get what you MUST have, now. Work for a while and save your cash. As you work, make a list of tools that would make life easier. Then, when you have your list built up a bit, prioritize and buy. Keep doing it. It will never end, I promise.

    Many of us have more money in just tools than the trucks/vans we drive are worth new.

    Something else very important: take care of your tools! Well maintained tools do a better job. Don't use the wrong tool to save 1 min. You'll likely hurt yourself or damage something.

    Pocket tool list, just for you:
    1/4 Stubby
    auto driver (zoom-zoom)
    10" channel locks
    2 8" crescents
    digital meat stick
    Small IR thermometer
    Wire strippers
    small clamp meter
    Pen
    Small stat driver (for stat screws and other low volt wiring)
    Eye drops (anti dust insulation, etc)

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