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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    23

    Transport Refrigeration Units

    Anyone here work on these units? Just wondering similarities/differences with stationary refrigeration units?( I got up close with a intermodal unit today and it looked fairly interesting to work on?). Do you like working on these units? Weirdest thing you've ever found in a reefer trailer?. thanks.
    Is it fixed yet?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    720
    Well when you consider that in most cases a transport unit will haul loads from -20 degrees F to plus 80 degrees F in ambients from -30 or colder to 100 plus within days while bouncing down a highway at 70mph and keep the temperature of the freight within 1 degree of setpoint there are interesting to work on.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Denali Park, Alaska, McMurdo Station, Antarctica
    Posts
    114

    transport units

    Mainly my experience is with Carrier transicolds and a couple of Thermoking container units.
    Carriers- damn near bullet proof, course all of them here are the electras so there is no diesel power plant driving it. But they will operate in just about any conditions you can imagine. The over the road units have alot of rubber hoses so they are your main leakage areas or at least have been in the past. Beyond that they seem to hold up pretty well. Kinda like big heat pumps only with more capacity.
    Good luch
    Remember the lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

    To err is human, to really screw things up requires an electrical engineer.

    If brute force and ignorance isn't working for you, you probably aren't using enough.

    What would you expect from a defense contractor- your money's worth?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    so cal
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by yanertrivr View Post
    Mainly my experience is with Carrier transicolds and a couple of Thermoking container units.
    Carriers- damn near bullet proof, course all of them here are the electras so there is no diesel power plant driving it. But they will operate in just about any conditions you can imagine. The over the road units have alot of rubber hoses so they are your main leakage areas or at least have been in the past. Beyond that they seem to hold up pretty well. Kinda like big heat pumps only with more capacity.
    Good luch
    yanetrivr, do u have pdf files on the carrier tansicolds. i work for carrier kinda and thought of how these could be for the techs and if they are taken care of.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Denali Park, Alaska, McMurdo Station, Antarctica
    Posts
    114

    Carrier stuff

    I don't have much for these in PDF but I will look, I can send a couple photos next week, and I'll send whatever I have in pdf at the save time. Just back to work and am still finding stuff after 7 months away. Most of our applications are Electras stuck in the wall of a warehouse, as soon as I get them de winterized i'll send some pics and maybe some of the process also.
    Cheers,
    Yanertrivr
    Remember the lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

    To err is human, to really screw things up requires an electrical engineer.

    If brute force and ignorance isn't working for you, you probably aren't using enough.

    What would you expect from a defense contractor- your money's worth?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    23

    Thanks

    I guess my real Question is : Why is Transport Refrigeration considered a separate trade in Canada?. What is so different about these units that makes it a whole separate trade?. How easy would it be for a Refrigeration guy to work on one of these units?

    Thanks
    Is it fixed yet?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    720
    Quote Originally Posted by vancouvertech View Post
    I guess my real Question is : Why is Transport Refrigeration considered a separate trade in Canada?. What is so different about these units that makes it a whole separate trade?. How easy would it be for a Refrigeration guy to work on one of these units?

    Thanks
    The refrigeration side is close but the electrical and diesel engines are different.I don't know about you but I havn't seen too many diesel powered reach in coolers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    so cal
    Posts
    176
    Quote Originally Posted by Reeferman View Post
    The refrigeration side is close but the electrical and diesel engines are different.I don't know about you but I havn't seen too many diesel powered reach in coolers.
    i used to run these around the country but didnt work on them, but i bet thephase shift is been taken care of via an inverter. i bet the module is dc tho. i wouldn't mind the knoledge. ill look it up yanrtrvr ill look it up this suday we got inventory sat morn o/t

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Denali Park, Alaska, McMurdo Station, Antarctica
    Posts
    114

    Arrow

    These will get you some for containers, but they should have some for the truck units here at this site also, I might have the Thermoking one also. Try these

    www.thermoking.com/tk/index.asp

    http://www.container.carrier.com/det...ETI742,00.html
    Remember the lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

    To err is human, to really screw things up requires an electrical engineer.

    If brute force and ignorance isn't working for you, you probably aren't using enough.

    What would you expect from a defense contractor- your money's worth?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Syracuse New York
    Posts
    38

    Transport Refrigeration

    Greeting fellow HVAC people, i was brosing search engines and came across this forum page, I am a consultant in transport refrigeration equipment and have started a forum page myself. If you want you can drop www.reefertek.com.

    I am looking fo other memebers with TRU expierence and post feedback that may benefit to this sight. as well i will chech in on this sight for postings as well.

    Regards, Reefer-tek

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Austin,Texas
    Posts
    105
    I spent a year in Afghanistan babysitting a couple hundred of these transport reefers in Kandahar.Thermokings,Carrier,and some Mitsubishi.Tough SOB's.I watched these things make -25C all summer with 115F+temps 6 hours a day.
    Yea we blew a couple dozen condensors but I didn't lose but 6 compressors and some units were 10 years old.Had to wash out the condensors every two weeks.(Dusty)Excellent pretrip program on the newer ones.I am impressed.Most using 134A.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Syracuse New York
    Posts
    38

    R134a

    Quote Originally Posted by cascader View Post
    I spent a year in Afghanistan babysitting a couple hundred of these transport reefers in Kandahar.Thermokings,Carrier,and some Mitsubishi.Tough SOB's.I watched these things make -25C all summer with 115F+temps 6 hours a day.
    Yea we blew a couple dozen condensors but I didn't lose but 6 compressors and some units were 10 years old.Had to wash out the condensors every two weeks.(Dusty)Excellent pretrip program on the newer ones.I am impressed.Most using 134A.
    No most reefer units are not 134a, actually R404a is real popular refrigerant here for its deep frozen capacity, we use 134a for medium temperature applications and air condition. I would believe considering the high ambient temp conditions over there, in afgan that 404a would only put the equipment to rest permanently. Its normal operating pressures typically operates 200psi abover and over 134a. operating pressures.

    Here is list of refrigerants that were used in TRU equipment and may still be found in tru equipment. r-12, r500, R502, r-22, r401b, r402a, r407c, r404a,and 134a.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Denali Park, Alaska, McMurdo Station, Antarctica
    Posts
    114

    Carrier thin line

    The carrier thin lines i am dealing with here are all R134A, with arctic kits so suprise they actually have cch on them, but they have them de-energized during compressor run time< make sense I suppose in warmer climates but???
    Remember the lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

    To err is human, to really screw things up requires an electrical engineer.

    If brute force and ignorance isn't working for you, you probably aren't using enough.

    What would you expect from a defense contractor- your money's worth?

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