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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lady Lake, Florida
    Posts
    799
    I too have seen many of those suction line accumulators rust down to the point they usually have pin hole leaks. Never seen one go BOOM!

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    66
    First of all, that is not a heat pump and the accumulator was added to the system for flood back problems (look at weld drip). Most obvious, if you could spin back the accum. to its original position, there's not enough piping to have that thing vertical. It was laying on its side, which cause liquid storage to expand rapidly under some undetermined condition. Time to look at previous service reports.

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    34
    WOW - never heard of it before. Must of been spontaneous combustion

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by heykiss View Post
    First of all, that is not a heat pump and the accumulator was added to the system for flood back problems (look at weld drip). Most obvious, if you could spin back the accum. to its original position, there's not enough piping to have that thing vertical. It was laying on its side, which cause liquid storage to expand rapidly under some undetermined condition. Time to look at previous service reports.
    It was the first time my company had been there so I dint have access to service records. If what the customer said is correct, they had never had anybody work on the system since it was installed. I believe the accumulator was at one time sitting vertical because of the hole that was put in the pan of the unit to secure the accumulator. Why did carrier put an accumulator on this cooling only condenser but not on all cooling only applications? Better yet, why in the heck did it explode?! Just curious

  5. #44
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    DC Metro Area (MD)
    Posts
    3,371
    Question: What was the homeowner's reaction and course of action?

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    55
    That was awsome! I think i might pull out my safty glasses more often. I once had a service valve blow on me while i was preasure testing the system at around 200 psi, scared the living **** out of me. Needless to say i don't squat over them anymore. One of these days 410a is gonna kill someone.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    194
    I have seen one similar to this though not as impressive. Once the paint fails, the rust just slowly eats away the outer layer until it is so thin it fails all at once. Most units develop pin holes and are removed before they get to this point. I believe the rust starts at the fusible plug on the bottom where there is no paint on the pipe threads, then it slowly creeps up the sides, although it may start at the weld and go down. The ends of a cylinder have the greatest stress because they are flat, and the sharp bend where the metal bottom was stamped out to match the cylinder walls is the thinnest and most crystalline section.
    Another factor is the constant flexing of the metal when the unit cycles on and off. It may only be a few ten-thousands of an inch, but over time it will work harden the bottom corner? even more. Both of these processes are magnified by the extemely thin metal used by the manufacturer. Bottom line...poor engineering designed to cut costs.
    The vessel failed when the unit was off because that's when the pressure was highest in the accumulator.

    That's my story, and I'm stick'in to it <:<
    Last edited by ZZZRSC; 10-31-2007 at 04:21 AM. Reason: more info

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by ZZZRSC View Post
    The vessel failed when the unit was off because that's when the pressure was highest in the accumulator.

    That's my story, and I'm stick'in to it <:<
    You may be right, it's just crazy that the accumulator blew before the copper pipping did which proves it was a defective accumulator.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    194
    I think the larger surface area makes it less able to stand pressure. I was told that 1/4" od copper can stand 1600 psi., I never tested it. I used to work at a lab that had a lot of toxic high pressure gases (2000-3000 psi) and they ran s.s. tubing to various equipment. It was 1/8" OD and 1/16" inch ID I believe. It was not unusual according to the researchers that worked there. They were very safety conscious, and the only accident I remember was when someone opened a fitting without first removing the residual pressure in that small line, and it sent him to the hospital overnight.

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