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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Rochester, New York
    Posts
    392
    Polar is the key. L1 needs to go to L1 l2 to L2 and so on. This is from OD unit to ID unit.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    123

    Fu n' ELECTRICIANS

    I wanted to Strangle this Electrician.....
    after smokin the Board


    The Indoor Unit is 115 V

    The Outdoor Unit is 220 V

    DC12 V (POLAR)
    from the outdoor unit......to the Indoor Unit


    It is Possible the BirdBrain Electrician Crossed the Wires

    This would Definetely Smoke the Board

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    123
    Just called the elec.

    He used the same breaker .. 20 amp for both the AH / Cond. unit

    instead of running 2 seperate circuits

    This can be done...but only with 3 wire + Ground
    he used 2 wire

    We Discussed the installation prior..
    .using 2 sep. circuitshe was obviously trying to save on Materials

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Were the instructions missing too? I put on in for my brother. I read the instructions FIRST. If you read them later, they are the CORRECTIONS!

    The power for the indoor unit comes from the outdoor unit. (DC I Think) Do not wire the indoor unit directly to the AC power.

    Good luck.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Gold Coast of Connecticut
    Posts
    4,656
    Quote Originally Posted by dismas66 View Post
    Just called the elec.

    He used the same breaker .. 20 amp for both the AH / Cond. unit

    instead of running 2 seperate circuits

    This can be done...but only with 3 wire + Ground
    he used 2 wire

    We Discussed the installation prior..
    .using 2 sep. circuitshe was obviously trying to save on Materials
    I think you had better look for a Mitsubishi installer to look over this unit before you turn it on again, you just don't quite get it.

    What is the exact model # of both units.
    Aire Serv of SW Connecticut- Gas heat, dual fuel and central a/c systems installed and serviced

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    39

    Japanese to English translator anywhere?

    I have installed no less than 30 Mr. Slim units this year. I still get a chuckle from reading the instruction manual. I have been using 14 awg tray cable from the outdoor to the indoor with great success. Our local codes require a form of disconnect indoors. We use the Mitsubishi 3 pole wall switch. It has t1,t2,t3 on one side and m1,m2,m3 on the other. Since the tray cable is clearly marked you can't go wrong. On the MS series just use "one" as L1, "two" as 2, "three" as N and "four" as ground. If it is a MSY, MSZ etc. use "one" as S1, "two" as S2, "three" as S3 and "four" as ground. Since Mitsubishi requires you to break all three legs than why not use their switch. Not to mention the fact it looks better than a disconnect box on most indoor installs. For those who have never seen tray cable....It is a Black cable with four inner wires each clearly marked with "one", "two", "three" and "four".

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    39

    Japanese to English translator anywhere?

    I have installed no less than 30 Mr. Slim units this year. I still get a chuckle from reading the instruction manual. I have been using 14 awg tray cable from the outdoor to the indoor with great success. Our local codes require a form of disconnect indoors. We use the Mitsubishi 3 pole wall switch. It has t1,t2,t3 on one side and m1,m2,m3 on the other. Since the tray cable is clearly marked you can't go wrong. On the MS series just use "one" as L1, "two" as L2, "three" as N and "four" as ground. If it is a MSY, MSZ etc. use "one" as S1, "two" as S2, "three" as S3 and "four" as ground. Since Mitsubishi requires you to break all three legs than why not use their switch. Not to mention the fact it looks better than a disconnect box on most indoor installs. For those who have never seen tray cable....It is a Black cable with four inner wires each clearly marked with "one", "two", "three" and "four".

  8. #21
    220 vac is 2 @ 110v and a ground
    110/120 vac is 1 @ 110v, 1 @ nuetral, 1 @ ground
    and I'm just an elevator mechanic
    g'luck

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by stickball View Post
    220 vac is 2 @ 110v and a ground
    110/120 vac is 1 @ 110v, 1 @ nuetral, 1 @ ground
    and I'm just an elevator mechanic
    g'luck
    There is no ground (correct term is neutral) wire in a single phase residential 220VAC circuit; it is run from the 2 hot (live) wire from the entrance panel.

    The quoted model is 120V AC fed straight through from outdoor unit to indoor unit. 120VAC going to outdoor unit (L+N), same power circuit plus a control (signal) wire go to the indoor unit (and a ground wire to ground both units.) It's very clear in the installation manual. Check the wiring to see if it matched instruction. If 230VAC was fed to the outdoor unit by mistake then the control boards in both units may be damaged.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Myrtle Beach, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Quote Originally Posted by Geotherm View Post
    There is no ground (correct term is neutral) wire in a single phase residential 220VAC circuit; it is run from the 2 hot (live) wire from the entrance panel.
    There IS a ground in a single phase 220 volt residential circuit, but NOT a neutral. The ground is for safety and is not normally a current carrying conductor. There are also two hots.

    There is both a ground and a neutral in a residential single phase 110 volt circuit, but only 1 hot.
    Remember, Air Conditioning begins with AIR.

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