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  1. #1

    Cooking Odors and Air Cleaners

    Hi,

    We live in South Florida. Our house is 12 years old and our AC system wasn't designed correctly.

    The biggest problem is that the AC return for the downstairs is located right next to the kitchen. As you might expect, cooking odors permeate the entire house (sometimes for days) because of this design flaw. Unfortunately, because the ducts for the return are between floors, we cannot re-locate the return for the main AC system without removing a large part of the ceiling.

    So we are looking for a whole-house air purification system. I'm specifically interested in a system that uses activated carbon granules.

    Can anyone here make some suggestions for air purifiers that would help?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    906
    When I wear a mask with a high efficiency filter outside, I can't smell anything -- no flower smells or anything else. Except for gases, no carbon necessary. Carbon is well marketed to absorb odors, but actually a lot of odors are carried by particles. Catch the particles, catch the odors they carry. It's fascinating how effective it is. I also found particle counts increasing along with cooking odors.
    -If you won't turn it on then nothing else matters.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    535
    Take some pictures, the return is going to need to be relocated to solve your problem. Electronic air cleaners will help and should be installed in duct system near furnace or airhandler. Honeywell make a return air grille version,which may work for you.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by acwizard View Post
    Take some pictures, the return is going to need to be relocated to solve your problem. Electronic air cleaners will help and should be installed in duct system near furnace or airhandler. Honeywell make a return air grille version,which may work for you.
    Can you please tell me more about the Honeywell return air grille? Model number too.

    Thanks!

  5. #5
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    Sep 2002
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    Use the stove range hood when cooking - that should solve the problem if it's vented outside.
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    906
    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    Use the stove range hood when cooking - that should solve the problem if it's vented outside.
    Got to agree with that -- venting outside close to the source is effective.
    -If you won't turn it on then nothing else matters.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
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    535
    Honeywell F52 is a ceiling return electronic air cleaner. I do agree with the others that you are better off trying to eliminate the source by exhausting .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,062
    Quote Originally Posted by DigitalDawn View Post
    Hi,

    We live in South Florida. Our house is 12 years old and our AC system wasn't designed correctly.

    The biggest problem is that the AC return for the downstairs is located right next to the kitchen. As you might expect, cooking odors permeate the entire house (sometimes for days) because of this design flaw. Unfortunately, because the ducts for the return are between floors, we cannot re-locate the return for the main AC system without removing a large part of the ceiling.

    So we are looking for a whole-house air purification system. I'm specifically interested in a system that uses activated carbon granules.

    Can anyone here make some suggestions for air purifiers that would help?

    Thanks in advance.
    You are forgetting the most important part of Indoor Air Quality, fresh air change. When a home is occupied, you should have an air change in 4-5 hours according to ASHRAE,Am Med ASSn etc. Adequate filter remove particulate, merv 11.
    Keep the home <50%RH , the rest will take care of itself.
    I use a Ultra-Aire whole house ventilating dehumidifier on my home in FL with great results. You can add Active charcoal but fresh air and <50%RH keeps the home healthy, comfortable, and odor free.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  9. #9
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    Sep 2002
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    ^Damn it, every solution you propose involves installing a ventilating dehumidifier.
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,062
    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    ^Damn it, every solution you propose involves installing a ventilating dehumidifier.
    I amend my recommendation. No ventilating dehumidifier if the home is getting the recommended air changes suggest by ASHRAE, which is an air change in 5-6 hours.

    Lets do it your way.
    Let put in an expensive air filter instead with a blue light!
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    I don't know
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    2,897
    ^My solution is to ventilate at the source.
    General public's attitude towards our energy predicament: "I reject the reality of finite resource depletion and substitute it with my own; energy is infinite, we just need an alternative storage medium to run the cars on. The economy can grow indefinitely - we just need to "green" everything! Technology is energy! Peak what?"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI/Cape Coral, FL
    Posts
    6,062
    Quote Originally Posted by amd View Post
    ^My solution is to ventilate at the source.
    I can live with that in moderate green grass climates. Keeping the cool corners dry-<50%RH, makes the space comfortable and healthy.

    Better for climates where the summer dew point is lower than the inside temp to pressurize the space with some kind of filtered fan device with a drying attachment.
    Regards TB
    Bear Rules: Keep our home <50% RH summer, controls mites/mold and very comfortable.
    Provide 60-100 cfm of fresh air when occupied to purge indoor pollutants and keep window dry during cold weather. T-stat setup/setback +8 hrs. saves energy
    Use +Merv 10 air filter. -Don't forget the "Golden Rule"

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