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  1. #14
    I googled the hood and it's not cheap and is rated for 1100 CFM...

    Wonder what other 1100 CFM hood folks due to make that much air?

    In the short term I would open a nearby window & look into a throttle for that animal.
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    I'm constantly amazed at how ignorant remodeling contractors are about the affect these 1000+ cfm range hoods, that are all the rage these days, have on the home.
    IMO, your remodeling contractor should have taken this into account from the beginning.

    That is a heck of a lot of air that needs to be made up, and will need to be a forced makeup air system. I'm no ERV expert, but I haven't seen any that will handle the kind of airflow you will need.

    IMO, you really don't need that much exhaust, probably not even half that much...

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    A tight home with that much exhaust would probably be sucking sewer gas up a trap.

    Get a swamp cooler for make up air, try not to cook big meals in the monsoon season. Or open up a kitchen window, not a winter solution.

    In Canada you would have a make up air fan with an electric duct heater to temper the air.

    Not going to run the hood exhaust through an ERV in this situation, not an ERV solution
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    1,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Carnak View Post
    In Canada you would have a make up air fan with an electric duct heater to temper the air.

    Not going to run the hood exhaust through an ERV in this situation, not an ERV solution
    Bingo, in the winter, with that kind of exhaust, you need to heat the air coming in. An ERV/HRV is not what you need. You need to bring in air when the exhaust runs, not exhaust more air. I see this all the time. The appliance company tells these people they need huge exhaust fans, but fail to mention the need for make up air. I would do something with this before winter. In the mean time, open the window when you use your fan. People have had CO poisoning from this exact situation. By the way, you don't need a blower door test. You already have a blower door hanging above the stove.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    7
    Thanks for all the replies.

    One thing that I haven't done yet was to open (cut the drywall)the return vent in the kitchen. Also, I replaced my gas furnace to a high efficiency furnace with uses PVC pipes instead of Type B vent. The HVAC installer also noticed a 5" insulated duct running from the outside to the furnace room but not connected to anything. He told me that it was used to feed the furnace with air(make up air I would imagine). He told me that I could remove it because the PVC pipe runs to the outside of my home and now feeds the furnace as much air as it needs. Also he told me that my basment was cold in the winter because I had no return in the basement and suggested that I connect a 3" duct to the return and cut a hole in the drywall so it can draw the cold air out of the basment.

    With all that said and done. Would it be a wise idea to connect that 5" insulated duct that runs to the outside of my house to the return duct? Could that possibly help my cause or do I absolutely need draw air into the kitchen?

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by Dante1 View Post
    With all that said and done. Would it be a wise idea to connect that 5" insulated duct that runs to the outside of my house to the return duct? Could that possibly help my cause or do I absolutely need draw air into the kitchen?
    That 5" duct would have no hope whatsoever of making up that much air.

    With the pressures involved in the typical HVAC system, you would be looking at a 14" or larger duct to move 1000+ cfm. Not to mention that your system likely couldn't handle that much unconditioned outside air, it would totally overwhelm the heating or cooling capacity of the system.

    You need a way to avoid changing out the air in the entire house several times over when that exhaust fan is running. With the volume of air involved, you would need a fan forcing air in.

    To do it right, you may end up spending close to as much money on an appropriate makup air system as you did on that massive overkill of an exhaust hood.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by DesMech View Post
    By the way, you don't need a blower door test. You already have a blower door hanging above the stove.
    LOL, I was thinking the same thing. You could suck a good tight 2500 sq ft house down to -50pa with ease with an exhaust hood like that.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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