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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    9,548
    Quote Originally Posted by firecontrol View Post
    I dump the charge from my hoses after every check. Matter of fact I disconnect from the high side of the equipment first, open the high side of the guage to the crossover and then slowly open the low side of the guage to the crossover. IE: I put what liquid I took out of the system right back in. The only thing thing left in my guage set when im done is whatever gas it'll hold at the pressure of the low side. Anyone ever measured how much that is? Oh........ I run 5' hoses if someone is going to do the measurement.

    I pre-charge my gauge hose set before I hook them up.......




















    yeah,yeah, that's the ticket.

    Actually I don't.
    If everything was always done "by the book"....the book would never change.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Upstate, SC
    Posts
    2,919
    Only 1 oz or so, huh? I remember reading somewhere that a 6 ft hose held 5 ounces of liquid and the article warned against using the high side gauge unless you had reason to. Have I been mislead all these years on something else???

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    I always attach the high side gauge I don't know subcooling otherwise. I will recheck my gauges with the liquid line filled but that was what I got the other day.

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,346
    Quote Originally Posted by smokin68 View Post
    I pre-charge my gauge hose set before I hook them up.......
    I've done that for a critical charge ice machine using 404A. Learned by doing that they were DEAD serious about that machine being critical charge!

    Wouldn't cross my mind to do it for a resi R22 or 410A system, however. I do isolate the high side and then let the remaining liquid charge in the hose back into the low side. That's just good practice.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,889
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    however. I do isolate the high side and then let the remaining liquid charge in the hose back into the low side. That's just good practice.
    Along with the AIR too?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Air is always purged through the gauges upon hookup.

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    16,002
    Quote Originally Posted by GAHomeOwner View Post
    When a technician is testing the charge level or subcooling or superheat, and is using gauges with hoses that are several feet long, how much Freon is lost from filling up the hoses? Should the technician have a canister of Freon with him to replace what is lost when he completes his system check? Thanks.

    O God! how to folks get so bored? I wished I had time to worry about stuff like that,
    heck with my busy life that would be like meditation to me.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,889
    Quote Originally Posted by BigJon3475 View Post
    Air is always purged through the gauges upon hookup.

    Just checking.

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,346
    Quote Originally Posted by kbghdg View Post
    Along with the AIR too?
    Of course not. Air is purged via diminimus release when gauging up. I always purge a little every time even with low loss fittings or ball valves.

    Would you pump down your high side hose into the low side if you thought air was in your hoses?

    I didn't think so.

    Would you even hook up to a system with just plain ol' regular hoses and not purge them before adding refrigerant or even for merely checking pressures?

    I didn't think so.

    I don't let air remain in my hoses either, no matter what operation I'm performing with my manifold set.

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Fort Worth, TX
    Posts
    11,346
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Bill View Post
    O God! how to folks get so bored? I wished I had time to worry about stuff like that,
    heck with my busy life that would be like meditation to me.
    A similar thought crossed my mind...

    ...interesting what questions get asked in this section at times.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Houston,Tx.
    Posts
    16,002
    Quote Originally Posted by shophound View Post
    A similar thought crossed my mind...

    ...interesting what questions get asked in this section at times.

    Hey good to see a Texan on the Educational Committee and folks think were are just good
    old "dumb" country boys in Texas, I guess the "intelligent" owners here think differentially.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    “Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards". - Vernon Law

    "Never let success go to your head, and never let failure go to your heart". - Unknown

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    6,285
    Everything is bigger in Texas

  13. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,914
    I use 4' hoses with a ball valve on the end, then another 10" hose screwed onto the ball valve. Each of my 3 hoses is a 3 piece assembly(long hose-ball valve-short hose). The short hoses with a ball valve permanently attached are not a good idea because you can't purge the air out of just the small hose if you keep pressure in your manifold like I do.
    I can't stand low loss fittings!

    When I disconnect from a system, I open both valves on my manifold briefly to clear any oil, and close the ball valve on the liquid side.
    I let the system pull all the liquid out of my hoses and manifold, then close the ball valve on the vapor side and disconnect my hoses. I only loose the little bit of refrigerant in the 10" hoses.
    This leaves my manifold and hoses under some pressure from the remaining vapor.

    The next time I hook up to a system, I connect my hoses, purge the air out of the 10" hoses and open the ball valves.

    I'm loosing less than an ounce of refrigerant from connecting and disconnecting to a system.


    Before I got a 2nd set of digital gauges, I used the same set for R-22 and R-410A.
    Before hooking up to a system with a different refrigerant than the last one I worked on, I would bleed my gauges and manifold down to 0psi, and hook up to the system, then purge my hoses and manifold with the new refrigerant. Still probably loosing less than an ounce of refrigerant.

    Now that I have 2 digital manifolds, I just use one for each refrigerant.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

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