Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Elkhorn, Wisconsin 53121
    Posts
    21

    recovery tank capacity

    OK, I feel stupid asking this question, but here it is...How is the tank capacity calculated? I have a tank that has a W.C. 26.2# T.W. 16.7# I thought the TAR wheight was the weight of the empty tank, but it's not since the tank weighs only 7.7#'s. I used to know this just forgot it and can't find my documentation on it.
    Thank You,
    gapfaff@engineer.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    1,473
    Quote Originally Posted by gapfaff View Post
    OK, I feel stupid asking this question, but here it is...How is the tank capacity calculated? I have a tank that has a W.C. 26.2# T.W. 16.7# I thought the TAR wheight was the weight of the empty tank, but it's not since the tank weighs only 7.7#'s. I used to know this just forgot it and can't find my documentation on it.
    Thank You,
    gapfaff@engineer.com

    W.C. X 0.80 = legal capcity of refrigerant.

    Tare weigth is the weight of the vessel itself.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hamilton Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,406
    So w.c. 26.6 X 80% = 21.28lbs of refrigerant right?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by ptemko View Post
    So w.c. 26.6 X 80% = 21.28lbs of refrigerant right?
    To make it easy, yes.
    The "WC" is based on the weight of water it takes to fill the cylinder, many refrigerants, including R-22, take up less volume per pound, so more pounds of refrigerant will safely fit in the cylinder than is indicated by your equation.

    There is an equation you can do to figure out exactly how much refrigerant can be put into the cylinder, based on the specific volume of the refrigerant vs that of water, but it is probably best to just keep it simple.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    669

    slides of fill rates

    I made this up for my students from information from the National Refrigerants Manual. Notice that the filling factors are for 100% full tank so you'll need to take 80% of the calculated value. The Chart is available in the manual which you should be able to get at any United Refrigeration place.

    You'll see if you just use the .80 value you'll be off for some refrigerants, especially 404.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    keep your ice cold and flame hot

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    58
    What about mixed refrigerants? We work with 22 and 410a... My employer doesn't provide one for each so we end up dumping a little 410 into our tanks with the 22. (no, we don't re-use... or at least I don't.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    1,473
    Quote Originally Posted by SirCurmudgeon View Post
    What about mixed refrigerants? We work with 22 and 410a... My employer doesn't provide one for each so we end up dumping a little 410 into our tanks with the 22. (no, we don't re-use... or at least I don't.)

    Mixing refrigerants is a no-no. Your employer is going to get hit with a nice backcharge for every tank of mixed ref the chemical company has to destroy. It's much cheaper to just do things right.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by SirCurmudgeon View Post
    What about mixed refrigerants? We work with 22 and 410a... My employer doesn't provide one for each so we end up dumping a little 410 into our tanks with the 22. (no, we don't re-use... or at least I don't.)
    Companies like that are why so many supply houses have stopped swapping recovery cylinders for next to nothing.

    If things keep going like they have been lately, we will have to take full cylinders directly to a reclaimer....
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by dawgtchrr View Post
    I made this up for my students from information from the National Refrigerants Manual. Notice that the filling factors are for 100% full tank so you'll need to take 80% of the calculated value. The Chart is available in the manual which you should be able to get at any United Refrigeration place.

    You'll see if you just use the .80 value you'll be off for some refrigerants, especially 404.
    Thanks for the link to the chart.
    I hadn't ever looked at the specific density of R-410a before, glad I didn't pop the pressure relief of any recovery tanks, lol.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Lancaster, PA
    Posts
    669
    Quote Originally Posted by SirCurmudgeon View Post
    What about mixed refrigerants? We work with 22 and 410a... My employer doesn't provide one for each so we end up dumping a little 410 into our tanks with the 22. (no, we don't re-use... or at least I don't.)
    Doesn't really matter that your boss told you to do it. The EPA will fine you for any violation you do. But with that said, I don't remember that being a listed violation like intentional venting. Now the law does say that the Reclamation Facility can back charge the contractor for any mixed cylinder that needs to be destroyed. Technically the contractor owns that refrigerant until it is reclaimed, but again do the wholesalers really keep the records they're supposed to?

    If the boss cuts corners like this, what else is he doing to screw you and his customers?
    keep your ice cold and flame hot

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Greenwood IN
    Posts
    439
    Quote Originally Posted by SirCurmudgeon View Post
    What about mixed refrigerants? We work with 22 and 410a... My employer doesn't provide one for each so we end up dumping a little 410 into our tanks with the 22. (no, we don't re-use... or at least I don't.)
    Your supplier will most likely charge him out the wazoo

    We got some contaminated/mixed stuff out of a system once, boss went through the roof when he got that bill.
    Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one.
    -Albert Einstein

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana
    Posts
    2,338
    Quote Originally Posted by mark beiser View Post
    Thanks for the link to the chart.
    I hadn't ever looked at the specific density of R-410a before, glad I didn't pop the pressure relief of any recovery tanks, lol.
    410a recovery tanks are different then tanks for r 22.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    North Richland Hills, Texas
    Posts
    14,915
    Quote Originally Posted by berg2666 View Post
    410a recovery tanks are different then tanks for r 22.
    Not anymore, at least from the suppliers in my area.
    All the new tanks we have been getting back from our suppliers are rated for 400psi, so can be used for R-410a. They tell me that the old 300psi rated tanks are being retired, or recertified and fitted with a 400psi relief as the test dates expire.
    They don't give them any different of a paint job.
    If more government is the answer, then it's a really stupid question.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event