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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9

    Recording Studio & HVAC

    Got some questions concerning HVAC for Recording Studios. Would appreciate any and ALL help addressing them.

    Thanx!

    1.) Is there a preferred location to put a return in a Control room with
    equipment that's generating heat?
    2.) Is there a minimum or recommended distance the return should be
    from the supply?
    3.) Are there any "no-no's" about where supplies should be placed in relation to returns?
    4.) What type vents-registers-grills are better for Studio use and what
    company manufactures them? (Cooley & Hart was recommmended) (Are plastic registers quieter?)
    5.) For noise reduction is it better to oversize the vent-register-grill?
    6.) Where's the best location for a balancing damper: at the vent-register-
    grill of the room, or back at the Air Handler?
    7.) What do I do (or have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm
    recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that
    room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)
    8.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the
    ceiling or on the wall?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,032
    I have done a few of these type systems. Are you using sound absorbing insulation on the surface of the walls with a curtain like a theatre? yes we oversize the vents supply and return. placement is critical because your equipment could pick up the sound. As far as registers, it depends on location but I would look at an eggcrate style, the metal ones with dampers may rattle. I like to filter away from the room on these systems as well and dont let the unit sit on the other side off the wall. There is a company called "casco" that makes "sound flex". pretty expensive but it may be good for your room.all metal must be ligned as well which helps absorb sound.

    I remember some sound bats 4" thick attached to the wall concealed by a curtain. This was in a house where the guy did sound mix for broadway musicles. use good equipment with low d.b.'s variable speed for sure!!!!

    good luck, and what do you do in the room, personal music or your own label?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atlanta GA area
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    21,173
    Just one more thought: Be sure you get lots of air movement across the actual amps/boards (but not close to the microphones). You want to absorb the heat those units produce. Yes, oversize the ductwork, and put your filters and dampers at the A/H or furnace and not at the room.

    The idea of VS is a good idea also, they are quiet!!!!!
    GA-HVAC-Tech

    Quality work at a fair price with excellent customer service!

    Romans Ch's 5-6-7-8

    2 Chronicles 7:14

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    plas grills | registers have LESS free area

    put returns high, near heat source

    isolate ducts with canvas sections

    read lots herein

    damper location does not matter if the ducts & plenums are sealed!

    it is unlikely that you will push in more air than can flow out!
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9

    Thanx for the help!

    Greetings!
    Thank you all for your comments! I have comments below, but any of you please feel free to comment on any question to any individual. I only listed your names in response to your replies. Thanx!

    Here is info on my HVAC system...
    The Air Handler model # is ARUF024-00A-1A and the Heat Pump is CPLE24-1. Both units are manufactured by Goodman. (The air handler is a 2-ton system correct?)

    Ok, now the responses...

    Mstrav:Thanx for the "eggcrate" register info . I have NO idea what that is,
    but I'll Google info for it when I'm done with this post. I wanted a
    variable speed air handler but couldn't afford it at the time. As for
    my music, it's for my own personal use, but someday it WOULD be
    nice to have my own independant label. Thanx for asking!

    ga-HVAC-tech: About your tip on getting lots of air movement across the
    amps etc, according to the drawings listed here:
    http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/posting.php
    do you think it would be better to have BOTH returns
    or just 1? If you feel it should be 1 return, does it look like
    it should be the one on the right side or left? (I put 2 returns
    in to draw the heat from the equipment (rack & mixer)
    and to have air movement to the other side.
    Would 2 returns cause an "imbalance" in the room?
    If it did cause an imbalance would the dampers at
    the Air Handler for the return correct this?
    Also, do you think the 8" supply throwing air forward would
    be enough supply for a room this size (228 sq ft)? If not,
    what would you recommend? Thanx for the tip on the filters
    and dampers!

    cem-bsee: Much appreciation for the tips on the grill positions and damper
    locations.

    Gentlemen (or any Ladies that are on here), I have one more request for you.
    The link above is a site for those of us building Recording Studios. In my previous post I listed some questions. I have rephrased them below and I would really REALLY appreciate your help in answering them. There are many HVAC questions posted on our site, but only a select few who have the knowledge to answer them. Your responses would help me in posting answers or solutions to questions relating to supplies, returns, supply & return placement, air flow & grills registers. I know I'm asking a lot, but I hope you will have the patience and understanding to help me (us) out. A few of them you have answered, but here they are in their entirety:

    1.) What are the best locations to put a supply and return in a room in general? (i.e.(I made this up!)-Supply should be on the ceiling with return no less than 10ft or 60% of the total room distance away from the supply. Return should be mounted near the floor(?)/ceiling(?)

    2.) Is there a minimum or recommended distance the return should be from the supply? (may already be answered from question above)ALSO, do you get better overall room airflow by having a supply at one end of the room and the return at the other?

    3.) What type vents-registers-grills are quiter or better for Studio use and what company(s) manufactures them? (i.e.-plastic grills/registers because they're quiter)

    4.) For air-flow noise reduction, is it better to oversize the vent-register-grill and if so by how much? In other words, a standard size for residential grill/register MAY be 12"x5". To oversize a grill/register this size (or close to this size) would make it how much larger? (Does the "size" of the"oversize" grill/register have anything to do with the size of the duct?)

    5.) For noise reduction purposes (Air noise), where's the best location for a balancing damper for a supply or return: at the vent-register-grill of the room, or back at the Air Handler?

    6.) What do I do (or need to have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)

    7.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the ceiling or on the wall?

    8.) Is it true that if you have 2 seperate supplies in a room from 2 different vents/registers (with the supplies coming from the SAME trunk but at different locations on the trunk), whatever the cfm of those supplies are your return should be pulling the same for better room airflow and room pressurization?

    9.) If you already have a vent in a room, what needs to be done to MAXIMIZE the air flow in that room?

    LAST ONE!
    10.) How do you figure the amount of air you need in a room based on the room's size?

    Once again, THANK-YOU for your time. I sure-am hopin' for some great responses!

    Take care & GOD Bless
    Stanley

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Boise Idaho
    Posts
    1,032
    any dampers should be as far away from the room as posible. run a trunk line and at the branch install the damper. the room I did had a 1.5 ton and I doubled the size of each supply. 8 x 18 was the size if i remember correct with 10" duct on each.The air came in horizontal for all supplys and returns. for the return instead of say a 20 x 20, I used a 20 x 30 eggcrate style with no filter. filter will cause restriction, which will make noise and sensitive equipment will here it. locate it by the heat load if you can.

    there is a product called "sound flex" its like r-8, I would use it for your final conection from your main to register on each one. I think it only comes in like 10' lengths. its made by Casco in california.

    the variable speed would be nice, soft starts and stops, would be worth it.

    as far as size you need to look at all your equipment, amps, recorders, tower and computers, etc.. If there are outside walls or windows look at that as well. outside temp has an effect as well. if this is a garage conversion, they usually lack insulation so think about that as well.

    the other room I did was a trane gas pack with a 3 zone zoning system, unit was 2-stage cooling with variable speed. return in ceiling above equipment, 2 supplys over stage area. evrything was double oversized normal.

    enjoy, matt

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,837
    Quote Originally Posted by camistan View Post
    Greetings!
    Thank you all for your comments! I have comments below, but any of you please feel free to comment on any question to any individual. I only listed your names in response to your replies. Thanx!

    Here is info on my HVAC system...
    The Air Handler model # is ARUF024-00A-1A and the Heat Pump is CPLE24-1. Both units are manufactured by Goodman. (The air handler is a 2-ton system correct?)

    Ok, now the responses...

    Mstrav:Thanx for the "eggcrate" register info . I have NO idea what that is,
    but I'll Google info for it when I'm done with this post. I wanted a
    variable speed air handler but couldn't afford it at the time. As for
    my music, it's for my own personal use, but someday it WOULD be
    nice to have my own independant label. Thanx for asking!

    ga-HVAC-tech: About your tip on getting lots of air movement across the
    amps etc, according to the drawings listed here:
    http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/posting.php
    do you think it would be better to have BOTH returns
    or just 1? If you feel it should be 1 return, does it look like
    it should be the one on the right side or left? (I put 2 returns
    in to draw the heat from the equipment (rack & mixer)
    and to have air movement to the other side.
    Would 2 returns cause an "imbalance" in the room?
    If it did cause an imbalance would the dampers at
    the Air Handler for the return correct this?
    Also, do you think the 8" supply throwing air forward would
    be enough supply for a room this size (228 sq ft)? If not,
    what would you recommend? Thanx for the tip on the filters
    and dampers!

    cem-bsee: Much appreciation for the tips on the grill positions and damper
    locations.

    Gentlemen (or any Ladies that are on here), I have one more request for you.
    The link above is a site for those of us building Recording Studios. In my previous post I listed some questions. I have rephrased them below and I would really REALLY appreciate your help in answering them. There are many HVAC questions posted on our site, but only a select few who have the knowledge to answer them. Your responses would help me in posting answers or solutions to questions relating to supplies, returns, supply & return placement, air flow & grills registers. I know I'm asking a lot, but I hope you will have the patience and understanding to help me (us) out. A few of them you have answered, but here they are in their entirety:

    1.) What are the best locations to put a supply and return in a room in general? (i.e.(I made this up!)-Supply should be on the ceiling with return no less than 10ft or 60% of the total room distance away from the supply. Return should be mounted near the floor(?)/ceiling(?)

    I wouldn't crowd them together but there's no set rule that I'm aware of in this regard. Good horse sense is best. Heat rises and you've got microphones that are designe to pick up noise. It's normal to try and create some air circulation in the room. For example, putting the supplies around the perimeter of the room and the return in the center. Best bet is to have the supply and return air volumes equivalent so the room is not pressurized either positive or negative.

    2.) Is there a minimum or recommended distance the return should be from the supply? (may already be answered from question above)ALSO, do you get better overall room airflow by having a supply at one end of the room and the return at the other?

    Number of supply outlets and thier location depends entirely on the room geometry and loads. You've specified 2-tons (24,000 Btu's) for this job. That's not a huge unit if there's a lot of latent load from the recording equipment.

    3.) What type vents-registers-grills are quiter or better for Studio use and what company(s) manufactures them? (i.e.-plastic grills/registers because they're quiter)

    I'm not prepared to answer this question directly without the manufacturer's manual in front of me but all of them provide noise ratings in their engineering sections.

    4.) For air-flow noise reduction, is it better to oversize the vent-register-grill and if so by how much? In other words, a standard size for residential grill/register MAY be 12"x5". To oversize a grill/register this size (or close to this size) would make it how much larger? (Does the "size" of the"oversize" grill/register have anything to do with the size of the duct?)

    Of equal concern about size is velocity. If the face velocity at the diffuser is high, there's more noise. That goes directly to the size of the duct system and number of supply outlets. You're system has a fixed amount of air delivery it's capable of. In the vicinity of 800 CFM. The greater the area in square inches the ducts are, the slower the blower will move the air through the duct, thus slowing the velocity. You actual installation company should be able to size all that for you.

    5.) For noise reduction purposes (Air noise), where's the best location for a balancing damper for a supply or return: at the vent-register-grill of the room, or back at the Air Handler?

    Balancing dampers should always be put as close to the main trunk as possible for noise reduction. Immediately after the damper, whever it is, there will be turbulence = noise. Don't even think about trying to restrict airflow with the damper in the diffuser. Noise galore!

    6.) What do I do (or need to have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)

    You installing contractor should be able to measure the final job for you. Make sure balancing the system is included in the quote.

    7.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the ceiling or on the wall?

    The average system gets better airflow by good system design and installation. This forum can give you some guidelines but not specifics. You've got a commercial application there so a Manual 'N' load calculation is the first step and move on from there.

    8.) Is it true that if you have 2 seperate supplies in a room from 2 different vents/registers (with the supplies coming from the SAME trunk but at different locations on the trunk), whatever the cfm of those supplies are your return should be pulling the same for better room airflow and room pressurization?

    Yes but it goes to total CFM in the room, not number of supplies or returns.

    9.) If you already have a vent in a room, what needs to be done to MAXIMIZE the air flow in that room?

    If you increase the velocity of the air through the duct, you'll increase the airflow and also the noise. If you change the size of the outlet, you can increase the CFM's without increasing the noise. This is a science, you see?

    LAST ONE!
    10.) How do you figure the amount of air you need in a room based on the room's size?

    Manual 'N' for commercial application.

    Once again, THANK-YOU for your time. I sure-am hopin' for some great responses!

    Take care & GOD Bless
    Stanley

    You're welcome.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

    If you are waiting for the 'other guy' to change first, just remember, you're the 'other guy's' other guy. To continue to expect real change when you keep acting the same way as always, is folly. Won't happen. Real change will only happen when a majority of the people change the way they vote!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    6,295

    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by camistan View Post
    Got some questions concerning HVAC for Recording Studios. Would appreciate any and ALL help addressing them.

    7.) What do I do (or have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm
    recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that
    room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)

    8.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the
    ceiling or on the wall?
    You need to discuss Studios with HVAC-Talk memeber tpa-fl .
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    9
    Hey Guys,
    Before I go any further let me say a big THANK-YOU for the replies!

    I had some questions based on the replies...
    (Please see the links below to see pics of the HVAC set up I'm speaking of )

    1.) What are the best locations to put a supply and return in a room in general? (i.e.(I made this up!)-Supply should be on the ceiling with return no less than 10ft or 60% of the total room distance away from the supply. Return should be mounted near the floor(?)/ceiling(?)

    Based on the answers to this question, (in general) would it be correct to say that it's better to have returns in location(s) in a room that allow it to "pull" air in a direction/manner that allows the air to circulate in the room?

    2.) One reply was correct as far the latent heat I will be distributing in the room via my equipment. My control room is approximately 230 sq. ft. (19ft x 12ft rectangle) The estimated cfm stated here is 145-200 with an 8" flexduct (I'm waiting on info from Goodman on that). I have an 8" Flexduct supply from my trunk supplying this 1 room. The supply (will be) mounted on the ceiling in the rear of the room blowing air forward (longways-in the 19ft direction). The duct in the rear that has my supply at present only has the 1 vent. Would it be beneficial to have 2 vents? (If I DO have 2 vents, they will HAVE to use the same duct. Each vent would be near each 19ft wall but mounted in the ceiling) One reason I have to do it this way is because unless I soffit (which would cause problems) I only have one ceiling joist cavity to run/span my duct. The next nearest ceiling cavity to run my duct will put the vent really close to me. I have a HEAT PUMP SYSTEM...Heat pump air is too "cool" for me as it is...on top of that, I will be using an ERV so in the winter that air may even have a bit MORE chill on it! I figure if I can get a register/grill to throw the air forward enough in the room in a wide pattern, maybe I could just have the one register/grill.

    Ok, ok, tell me if I have this straight...
    Between a single supply register/grill or 2 (if it's better) it/they will only blow a certain volume of air (cfm) into the room. Whatever this volume is, I should have the same amount of return to have a balanced pressure in the room. If I were to put one register/grill in the room (in the location as stated above)and 2 returns, in the event I had more return cfm than supply (negative pressure?) could I balance this out by putting a damper at the air handler to reduce some of the return flow? (Phew!!)

    5.) For noise reduction purposes (Air noise), where's the best location for a balancing damper for a supply or return: at the vent-register-grill of the room, or back at the Air Handler?

    One response here was to put the dampers as close to the main trunk as possible. Right now I have 2 seperate returns (one 7" and one 8"...see pics!) coming from the bottom-rear of my air handler (which is where my main return is located). Could I put some type of damper where these flexduct lines come out of my air handler to "balance out" my level of return IF I NEEDED TO?

    6.) What do I do (or need to have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)

    Is there a "poor-man's" way to measure this? Or even a device to measure the supply and return that isn't REALLY expensive? (Expensive=over $125.00)

    7.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the ceiling or on the wall?

    A "Manual "N"???...Uhmmmm...I have no clue...is this a book? By the way...can you recommend a book to explain the basics (cfm, air velocity etc etc) of HVAC for a BEGINNER? Is this "Manual N" a book for beginners? (Just need something to explain the basics without getting EXTREMELY technical!!)

    Ok, that's it right now...if it would help to visualize my system, go here...
    http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/vi...ghlight=#62505
    (PLEASE NOTE! The HVAC layout has been modified for the time being...go here...(HVAC Return Air Addition)
    http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/vi...ghlight=#62620

    Hope this helps!

    Once again, many thanx for your help!
    Take care & GOD Bless
    Stanley

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Tampa, Florida
    Posts
    1,634
    Not sure how I missed this thread -- this is my bread & butter!

    Looking over your diagrams, I have a few things...

    Quote Originally Posted by camistan View Post
    1.) Is there a preferred location to put a return in a Control room with
    equipment that's generating heat?
    I usually position control room returns BEHIND the listening position. Looking at your diagram, I'd put them above the rack, another by the back wall (ceiling or wall), maybe above the "client couch"

    2.) Is there a minimum or recommended distance the return should be
    from the supply?
    3.) Are there any "no-no's" about where supplies should be placed in relation to returns?
    I like a minimum of 6 feet, but this doesn't always happen. The primary goal is to keep supply air from re-entering the returns. You might be able to handle this by using directional grilles/diffusers.

    4.) What type vents-registers-grills are better for Studio use and what company manufactures them?
    5.) For noise reduction is it better to oversize the vent-register-grill?
    Grilles/diffusers & ductwork are the most critical to HVAC noise performance in a recording studio. As long as you've isolated the mechanical equipment (from vibration, etc), the only noise you'll have in your rooms is from airflow. Airflow noise is directly related to how fast it is moving through the ductwork and the restrictions it encounters.

    I normally use Titus (www.titus-hvac.com). My grille selection is based on location first (ceiling, sidewall, soffit, etc.) Next is any architectural consideration. Recording studios are usually showrooms which sell the client into booking studio time. Then I size the grilles and ductwork based on performance data of the possible grilles I've selected. Titus is excellent at providing detailed performance data. If the room & budget allow, quite often I'll just keep oversizing until the Titus performance sheets no longer list an NC number, which usually means it's below NC 10. Keep in mind that noise is additive (BUT NOT linearly), so if you use two grilles that are rated NC15 for the airflow you're pushing, you're going to have a room with a higher NC level. Don't forget about NC ratings on the returns as well, and keep the filters in filter racks at the air handlers, NOT in the return grilles!

    What type of recording & music will you be doing? If it's classical or jazz, shoot for an NC rating of 15 or less on the grilles. If you're doing R&R, an NC 20 or less. Country, NC 20 or less. Rap, NC 30 or less (it really doesn't matter with this type of music as most instruments are electronic, vocals are loud and very close-mic'd, dynamic range is more like "bury the needle").

    Something you've TOTALLY overlooked is where to put the supplies. I see two supplies for the whole facility. Screw that. There should be at least 2 supplies in each room you've shown. The goal is to have the air gently enter the room, remember that slower air velocity = less noise. How big is the iso room? You might be able to get away with 1 supply in there, but that depends on the size of the room. If it's a smaller room, make sure you make the temperature lower than "normal". People tend to feel claustrophobic in small rooms and lowering the temperature will make them feel less confined.

    For a setup like what you've drawn up, I'd put the two supplies on the left & right side of the mixing position or possibly one near the mixing position (center) and one between the back wall & rack, if you're going to have a client couch there. Unless you're running Class A amps for your monitors, the studio equipment's not going to be fussy about cooling. The humans will complain long before the equipment does. DO use good airflow techniques in the racks (ie: ventilation grilles at the top and bottom of the racks, be neat & tidy with your wiring to promote airflow, make sure the convective airflow inside the rack makes sense.) If you design your racks properly, they shouldn't require additional cooling fans.

    I don't know how much airflow you're pushing, but I can't imagine using an 8" supply for that control room. At my own home, I'm using an 8" supply duct w/12x8" curved blade grille, 124 CFMs just for my den, ~140 sqft and that's cutting it close for the way I like them. 12x10" would have been overkill 'though.

    For the studio portion, again I'd go with two supply vents, equally positioned within the room, probably on the ceiling or sidewall. The trick here is keeping the airflow from hitting the mics, especially the condenser mics. Just did an opera recording last weekend where the recital hall's AC was dumping air right onto my mics and would have killed my low-end without mic socks. How tall are your ceilings here? I've sometimes skipped using proper diffusers and made my own by putting a 90 or T connector off the supply line and having it "dump" air onto a board suspended ~3" from the duct, with the top of the board covered in Sonex foam. This requires a bit of a higher ceiling to get away with this 'though, otherwise you'll be dumping air right onto your mics. As nasty and noisy as they are in most offices, the perforated diffusers are quite good in the studio, mixing air quite well, BUT you really need to make sure they're oversized, otherwise they'll add white noise to your recording.

    On returns for the studio, just about anywhere works... I'll often locate them near a doorway (if that happens to be the direction I need to go with the ductwork) or on the ceiling near the walls. I've tried doing the reverse of this, with the supplies on the ceiling, near the walls and returns dead center, but found that it tended to cause more air movement rumble in my floor-mounted mics for clarinets, violas, etc. The performers also weren't as comfortable with this configuration.

    Another consideration is how cold you want these rooms to be? While I'm quite comfortable mixing at ~78F,45%RH, I know my musicians would kill me if I kept the studio at that. I usually keep the studio ~70-72F, 45%RH for the easier performances, 65-70F for performances which require more physical exertion by the performers. Don't forget the heat load of lighting as well.

    6.) Where's the best location for a balancing damper: at the vent-register- grill of the room, or back at the Air Handler?
    Without a doubt, at the air handler or trunk line, as far away from the control room & studio as possible!!! Any turbulence in airflow = noise. Keep the noise away. On every job, I insist on balancing dampers for each room, to be place on the trunk. In cases where I need maximum noise isolation (like the studio), I'll have them do a home-run supply line back to the air handler's main plenum, likewise for the control room. If done right, it'd force the transmitted sound from the studio to have to do a U-turn in the plenum to go all the way back to the CR.


    7.) What do I do (or have done) to measure the amount of Supply I'm
    recieving in a room AND the amount of Return I'm pulling from that
    room? (This is so I'll know my supply and Return air flow is balanced)
    8.) Does the average room get better air-flow by having the Supply on the
    ceiling or on the wall?
    Air flow should be measured using an airflow meter/hood. Any HVAC contractor worth a damn will have one and will use it as part of their job. Unfortunately, there's tons of hacks out there which don't... Demand that it be part of the WRITTEN contract. No airflow & balancing in the contract = find another contractor.

    If you have enough well-spaced supplies, ceiling or wall is fine. Just a matter of what you're capable of installing there.

    Also don't overlook insulation in the walls AND ceilings. You're not looking for thermal performance as much as noise attenuation. We've even built false walls over the existing walls to add more noise insulation. Also did a budget improvement on a large black box theater by making batts out of 2x4's, fiberglass insulation (pink side facing into the space), ran some metal grid wire across it, lightly spraypainted it flat black until no more pink was visible and it worked surprisingly well. Actually looked professional once the flat black was added.

    I'm not a Goodman expert by any means, but from the Goodman equipment I've used, I'll say I'm not impressed, especially when it comes to noise levels. I just ripped the Goodman heat pump & AC out of my home. 60dB INSIDE when it was running. Granted, poor ductwork design, but still. It may "do the job" for cooling, but I'd highly suggest getting a quality variable speed air handler from one of the major brands (Trane/Carrier/Lennox/Rheem/Ruud.) They do put extra insulation in their units and do run quieter. Variable speed blowers also ramp up/down rather than switch on/off which will reduce noises from the pressure differences,etc. If you can spring for it, a multi-stage heat pump would also help by running on low stage most of the time, high stage only when needed. This also means even less air flow & velocity much of the time. This also means more efficiency for you when you're mastering and the studio's quiet. Zoning would be nice so that the talent can "chill" without freezing out the engineer and so that the studio doesn't have to be cooled when you're doing a 30 hr mastering marathon with no one else around. Another thing, the better brands have ways of making sure the supply temps from the heat pumps are hotter than traditional heat pump systems. I know Carrier offers this, not sure on the others.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    12,189
    You've received enough DIY information.

    This thread is closed.
    Perhaps you should have read the instructions before calling.

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